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----I " ALONG THE COAST."…

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ALONG THE COAST." (By a Travelling: Correspondent). Abergele and Colwy.n Bay people had the op- portunity of seeing la-st week a very presentable performance of Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night," although I think it was marred by a lack of elocutionary training in a considerable proportion cf the amateurs who took part in the representa- tion. The "mounting," and also the "acting," throughout were really excellent, except in so far as the latter included the dialogue. I did not rely upon my own impression of inarticu- lateness, but was confirmed by others present, to whom I addressed a few strictly allowable ques- tions. The young people who participated in the performance, with such a laudable object, should not be discouraged by this criticism, for their case is no worse than that of too many who think of actually earning a living on the stage, and it is due, unhappily, to that tendency to cl p the English words by educated English peo- ple which has recently been commented upon severely in the newspapers ♦ # The first requirement in acting is clear articu- lation, just as the first essential in music is cor- rect tone. The story of Demosthenes and the pebbles may be commended to the "Twelfth Night" company. Every syllable should be clearly heard to the most. distant part of the building. Mr Francis Nunn, who appeared the conceited seneschal, "Malvolio," was really good, and his elocution may be commended as a pattern to those who appeared with him. Mr C arles Ke.nyon as Sir Toby Belch, and Mr Archie Law as Sir Andrew Aguecheek, the two low comedy characters of the piece, were truly humorous, and next to Mr Nunn in elocutionary power. Miss B. Dorothy Law as Maria and Miss Hilda Pierson as Viola were also passable as elocutionists. While semational events are occurring to the eastward, Llandudno Junction, that new born bu, lusty infant among the Coast towns, is de- termined not to allow its interests to be over- looked. It, has the ill luck to possess antagon- istic parents, and it was born in a hurry when the .new Junction station was get out where it is. Half of it is claimed by the Conway Cor- poration, and the otaer half,, which is the greater half (!) owes allegiance to that singular local authority known as the Conway Rural District Council. As a consequence of this mixed parentage, a strange state of things ex- ists, for while tho lower portion of the district is well cared, for, well lighted, and well provided with roads, the upper portion is ill cared for, and its roads are mud puddles, and kept in a state of darkness. How can a district which is ill nour- ished in its upper half and coddled in its lower part be expected to flourish? I am strongly in- clined to think fc at the proper thing to do is to take the sword which King Solomon asked for, and "divide the living child in two," allowing Conway to take the half she claims a.nd giving the other half to a new urban district of Pen- sarn. However, the infant is determined to make its complaints heard, and it found its voice when the Ratepayers' Association was formed, a year or two ago. » Everyone knows how insistent are the cries of infancy whan they are tacked up by a good strong constitution, and really the Junction's voice has been so effectual that a large amount of good has already been done to the district, the crowning feat being the obtaining of tele- graph facilities at the local post office. The Association has succeeded by its agitation i.n obtaining extra street lamps, three deliveries of let.ers a day, as well as a later despatch; it has secured a sort of "nurse girl" for the infant town in the form of a police constable, to take better care of it of nights. Moreover, there is now a polling booth at the Junction at election times, and, wonderfulest feat of all, such a num- ber of members for the Junction have been sent to the Parish Council that the Junction has now a majority on that body, and can outvote the farmers, whose policy, of course, was always truly rural. The Association is at work upon further schemes for the development of the place, and I am told that there is every reason to hope that next winter the Junction will be lighted either with electricity or gas. I see, too, that a determined step is being taken to have the roads in the upper portion of the district, where, of course, the brains are to be found, in every well-constituted organism of bipedal classification at any rate! » I can give a little more information about the Ratepayers' Association. Its committee is elected annually by ballot at the annual public meeting, and it comprises tho largest tradesmen and heaviest ratepayers in the Junction disi/Jct. AI! jower to eibow But I have had my oye upon Councillor Hugh Owen, who is a. Junction man, the chairman of the Conway Rural Council, and also a member of the Con- way Town Council. My experience of Mr Hi.gh Owen is that he is somewhat slow in xr.cving in regard to betterment schemes. The other day, when the questicn came up of the Rural Council taking gas from the Ccnway Cor • poration for the upper part of the Junction, he started the id;a of communicating with the Alu- minium Corporation to ask if they could supply the Junction with electricity. That would be merely shelving the gas supply scheme. Mr Hugh Owen resides within that lower half of the Junction, which has already got the advantage of gas light, and I fail to see his objeciion to gas being taken up to the higher regions. If his suggestion were adopted the Conway Cor- poration would be prevented from deriving the benefit which they would be entitled to for sup- plying the gas, and his constituents up the Pen- rhos Hill would also be prevented from enjoying the blessing of the light which gaa would give. Do the Rural Council think that the Alumin- ium Corporation would go to the expense of laying ten miles of overhead cable, and several miles of underground cable which would be re- quired to bring current from Dolgarrog to the Junction for the small consumption which they would get in the upper part of the Junction dis- trict? That idea is absurd, and the Rural Council should hold a special meeting next week, and decide to agree to Conway Council's terms. They might then lay down the necessary gas mains, and in a few months the gas supply would be available for every house and snop which was willing to make use of it. I must now skip to the other end of my do- main, and congratulate the Rhyl community upon the result of the great ratepayers' meeting on Tuesday night. Of the meeting on Monday night I will say nothing, now that, happily, the die has been cast, and the Council have got au- thority to go ahead with their great project. I trust that Mr Rhydwen Jones, having had the utmost fair-play in his opposition, and having had the courage of his conviction that his scheme was the best, will realise that we must neces- sarily be governed by the majority, and will fall in loyally with his colleagues in carrying out the authorised programme. The meeting called- by the chairman of the Council was really an in- spiring one, and the cheer which was raised when Mr Cheetham showed us the slide contain- ing a perspective view of the new pavilion was grateful to the ear. The lion's share in convinc- ing the largo assembly that the Council's scheme was the best fell to Mr Tilby, and his adroit han lling of the audience and of the subject dis- played the truest eloquence and the finest traits of the public speaker. There is many a worse Bpeaker sent to Parliament, mind you! Mr Tilby was able to offer words of comfort to the most despondent ratepayer, for he showed that at the end of three years loans will be paid off to such an extent that there will be an annual saving of over £1100 in interest charges, whilst the burden of the new scheme, at its worst would not entail a heavier annual outlay than £90(} in interest and sinking fund. That, as we see leaves £200 to make good the loss, should there be one, on the concern. To this must be added at least JB300 a year saved by the reduction in the puerile business of carting sand off the pro- menade to the beach. At present the return of the drift sand to its proper place costs the town about ,£700 a year, and as the new gardens will be formed just where they will screen, from the prevailing winds, that part of beach which will be eastwards of the new gardens it is quite fair to expect that the saving on thia head will be at least half of the present total. There will thus be JB500 a year to be spent on concerts, without raising the rates a penny. The concerts will be, however, if well managed, actually a source of profit, and, therefore, we may anticipate, in three years, an actual reduction in the rates

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