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ST. ASAPH BOARD OF GUARDIANS.•

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ST. ASAPH BOARD OF GUARDIANS. • (iO CHRISTMAS BEER FOR WORKHOUSE INMATES. A LLANDDULAS PAUPER'S FURNITURE. This Boavd met on Friday, when there we present.:—Messrs EdSvjn Morgan, J.P. (chair- man), J. Frimston (vice-chairman), Jno. Jones, J. E Ellis, Jno. Roberts, Tho mats Evans, Aber- gcle; Robt- Davice, Bettws; R. E. Griffiths, Bodolwyddan; W. S. Roberts, J.P., Bodfary; Bennet Jones, J.P., Bylchau J. F. Jones, Cvvm; Robt. Jones, J. E- Jones, Mra Gee, Denbigh; Meters Ed. Williams, Dyserth; Wm. Williams, Henllan; Mark v rOSS, Llanddulas; \Vm. Jon.'P, Thomas Sciluc-bury, Lla ninefydd; Hugh Hughes, T. P. Jones, Limit air; Wm. Morris, Llew- B. Evans, Rhuddia-n; S. Perka, J.P., G. F. Gunner, Hugh EdwardW, I. Batho. Mrs De Ranee. Rhyl; Miss Jonea St Asaph; Mr JIK> Morris, Trefnant; Mr Jno. Jones, Waein; and Mr Chas. Grinu-loy (clerk). WHO IS RESPONSIBLE? On the Master's report being read, Mir S. Perks said he noticed that the va-grarus had increased- What was the reason ? The Master replied that he could not say- llng Relieving Officers were responsible for giving the orders for admission, and lie had' to accept the tramps on those orders. NO CHRISTMAS BEER. The Master applied for |x-rin;Nsion to ar- range for the usual Christmas treat, ajid Mra De Ranoe proposed that it be granted. IMz. T. Evans; Are they to hive beer this year ? (laughter). The Chairman I aseume not. It was agreed to give the usual treat but no ,'beer' TRADES WANTED. M.r Perks asked that in future all men ad- mitted to the Workhouse should be x-equired to etate their trade. This was agreed tQ. DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN PARISH RELIEF AND OTHER MONi.Y. A man liamed Williams from Dyserth again appeared before the Board, and aske# to be given 48 per week out-relief. In the past he nad received 3e, but no one would keep him {<?ir tihat, and he hoq1 found a triend at Dyserth who would take him for 4s, he doing clerical work besides. Several members expressed the opinion that the man should earn his own living- Mr Ed. Williams said he would speak plain- ly to the man. He had seen hjjn the woree or dirink. ajid would' mot support hi» getting relief otrteicle unless'it was in kind. Applicant: I have nevar spent lid of the pajiish "moiiey in drink. I do not touch the 3s. Mr J. E. Jones: What is the difference be- tween spending the parish 36 on drink and other money? Applicant: I never spend the money you give me lI drink. iMr Ed. Williams: You know the condition I have seen you in- Applicant: But it was not out of parish money. Thl) Chairma.n: Are you a teetotaller now? Applicant: Yes, now. Mr J. E. Jonee: And for a very good rea- son- You" are in the Workhouse now (laugh ter). The Board declined to increase the relief to 4,9, and decided" tlüt they would only give 36 in kind' as out-relief. Applicant: But no one will keep me for 3s- The Chairman Then cannot help yiou, and if you are seen under the influence of drink again the 3s will be stopped. b WANTED A CHRISTMAS TREAT. At this stage the Maste,r brought an able- bodied man before the Board with the idea of getting him discharged. The Master stated he was bound to db something as there were 58 men in the workhoujse and infirmary. Mr JOhill Roberts: They want a Christmas treat- THE CHAIRMAN'S DIFFICULTY. In going through the medical relief books, the Chairman said he was unable to decipher certain medical terms. He could not i-ead them, and he did not tunderisiand them (laugh- ieir)- .Mr Perks: Perhaps they dont want you to understand them (laughter). The Chairman then passed the book to the Clerk, and said no doubt Mr Griuiftley would be able to explain the terms by the next Board meeting, but the Clerk shook hie head and expressed doubt on the matter. CLAIMING A PAUPER'S FURNITURE AT LLANDDULAS. The Board then proceeded to deal with a matter respecting the furniture left by Mrs Griffiths, late of Llanddulas. The Olerk said that the Board claimed C13 Js, being the amount of relief granted to Mrs Griffiths during the twelve months preceding hoe death. A relative named Hughes had taken the furniture she left, although served witilr notioe that the Guartfiahs claimed it un- der the Act of Parliament. Mra Williams, the relieving officer, said she had seen Mr Hughes, who was a nephew of the deceased but he declined to hand oven anything, and said he did not care either for her nor the Board1- The Clerk: He says the furniture belongs to him. Mrts Williams explained that the old lady had formerly been a. cook, and it was surprising that she did not buy furniture on her marriage. Was it likely that her husband, who was senior partner in a butcher's business, was not able to furnish two rooms in a cottage alt Llanddulas 30 years ago? In conversation with the old lady the latter complained that "she was bonnered' by her late husband's relatives to re- turn a chest of drawers they had lent," and she did return it, getting another. That seemed to be the olJilvpiece of furniture she did not consider belonged to her- As regards a claim of £6 for meat supplied put in by the nephew the old la.(iy used to say that she had V?r Sunday's meat an return for the pastry she made her nephew. Mr John Hughce, the nephew, appeared be- fore the Board, and said he claimed the fur- niture-as belonging to his family. The de- ceased and her husbaaid simply went into the house 30 years ago because there was no room to put the furniture in another house. lIe was able to produce the accounts for things, and if the Guardians claimed her pergonal effects he wanted them to pay the bills. The Clerk explained that while the Guard- iM16 claimed L13 5s, Mr Hughes nut in bills for J613 Os 3d. It seemed as if the account was made up as near as possible to the Guardians' claim. Of the £ 13 Ü5 3d. £ 6 was for the meat supplied to the old lady. Mr Hughes: She neveir paid a opnnv for it. Mr Ellis: Did you ever send her a bill? Mr Hughes: No. The Clerk: It is said that she made pastry for you, and that the meat was given in rc- turn. Mr Hughes I paid her sixpence every Sat- urday for the pastry and gave her the meat- Mr John Roberts: You gave her the meat and now you claim far it. Mr Hughes then declared that he would kiss the Bible or anything else the Board wish- ed to prove that what he said was right. The Clerk said that in the bills submitted there was one for a coffin at JB4. The Board oinJy paid 15s for coffins. Mr Mark Cross said he was able to say that the claim to the furniture by Mr Hughes was genuine, as in 18/6 his family were accommo- dated m this very cottage when their own place was flooded out. With the exception of the chest of drawem Mrs Williams had spoken about the furniture to-day was the same as in 1876 The furniture belonged1 to Mr Hughes' family. Mr John Roberts proposed that the Board adhere- to their claim. There were always to be found plenty of relatives who would claim furniture after paupers died, yet during their lifetime thev allowed the ratepayers to support their relatives. People were ready to make tolaams and excuses, but they took no interest in their relatives while alive. On Mr Hughes' own showing he had given the meat each week ye* he claimed' £ 6 for it. He would make Hughes pay the Board's claim or hand over the furniture. Mr Perks seconded, and said that peonle coujd not take charge of other persons' effects without a wiLl. If the Board did mot pmess their claim they would be acting illegally. Mr Evans eaid he would support Mr Cross that the man keep the things- He believed that the meat had' been given, but that did rot matter- As to the statement that pauper coffins only cost 15s, he certainly would not like to thank that he or anyone oonnected with him wwild be put under the gorund in a deal board coffin costing 15s- They should give even nau pons something better. Mr Ell Is: Fe-iv. people ôan give their relatives ^Mrjtoberts And leave the ratepayers to bear On a vote being taken, it was decided bv 1Q aH ? torohf Boajd'6 cki-m, and to g e cofiin and'funerai FORESTERS AND WORKHOUSE RELIEF. Reference was made to the case of a man be- longing to the Order of Foresters. It stated that onoe a member of that Order en- tered a TO,chouse or asylum he could not claim 6'0k ?ay' rd that- Pub^ authorUv Order ™ r maint«nance against the BOARDING OUT CHILDREN. Air I. Batho, reporting from the Visiting Oominnttee, said it was felt that some statistics ehouild be obtained from other Unions -s to results of t^ boarding out of childiren- He M'e\«l, that Bangor, Carnarvon, and Holv- well Unions adopted that sy»tem, and the In- spector of the Local Government Boa^d had re- oommended it. Mr Gunner: Of course. He is a new man. The Clerk explained that when the Board suggested to the Local Government Board that they should' enlarge the workhouso that autho- rity suggested that the Board should "t re-

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