Hide Articles List

30 articles on this Page

[No title]

News
Cite
Share

The Defeat of Municipal Socialism. Socialism, whether fighting openly or working under the name of Progressivism, "received a heavy blow last March at the hands of the electors of London. That example has been followed in the Municipal elections throughout the country, and November ist, 1907, will be remembered as a black-letter day by the Socialist leaders. It is a pity that the Radicals, as a party, have so coquetted with Socialist tendencies for their rout at the elections was probably largely owing to that cause. The final re- o. sults arc given in "The Daily Telegraph," of November 4th, J907, as showing :— Conservative gains 152 Liberal gains 23 Labour gains. 20 Socialist gains. 5 < The Railway Trouble. It is difficult to take stock of a situation which may at any time undergo decisive developments. Rumour, moreover, is al ways busy at such times, and has a way of confusing the issues. In the case of the railway dispute the immediate issue is per- iectly clear, and should be kept constantly iiii view. No question of wages or hours is directly involved. One point, and one point only, forms the bone of contention. The Amalgamated Society of Railway Ser- vants desires that the directors of the vari- out railway companies should recognise the Society as the official organisation of their employees, and the channel through which representation may and shall pass. In the event of the railway directors refusing to concede the point at issue, the Society threatens a general strike, and its officials are empowered to call cut its members by the ballot, of which the figures were de- clared at the Albert Hall on Sunday. The figures deserve careful study. The officials sent out 97,631 ballot papers, of which 88,134 were returned. There were 2,436 spoilt papers, 76)925 voted in favour of per- mitting strike notices to be issued, and 8.773 against that course. Seeing that there arc more than 600,000 railway ser- vants in the country, it appears that Mr Bell's support is not of such a magnitude as to justify him in leaving any stone un- turned which would bring about peace in- stead of a disastrous strike; and with the directors fully alive to the terrible conse quences of such an eventuality to the whole country, there should be sound grounds for hope that the difficulties will be solved. • « Was Garibaldi of Welsh extraction? It ':s pretty commonly believed in some parts of North Wales that Garibaldi's great- grandmother was a Welshwoman, and a native of Cerrig-y-Druidion. Mr J. H. Edwards (father of Mr Kelt Edwards) says that Professor Ellis Edwards, M.A., of Bala, assured him that Welsh blood flowed through the great general's veins, and that he (the professor) had been in communica- tion with Mr Edwin Jones, of Towyn, who was intimately acquainted with Garibaldi's son, respecting the latter's Welsh ances- tors. The son spent some time in Wales 6omc years ago endeavouring to trace his ancestors, but he was not entirely sucessful in his quest. However, old residents of Cerrig-y-Druidion assert that the Italian hero's great-grandmother was a Catherine Jones, and that she went to'Italy as a lady's maid with an English family, sub- sequently settling down in that country. Evidently the story wants a lot of clearing up—who will attempt it? m • • • Both political parties at Colwyn Bay have of late shown considerable signs of activity. A few weeks ago the Liberals assembled in large numbers on the occa- sion of the formal opening of their new club premises. They had the assistance of Mr J. Herbert Roberts, M.P., in carry- ing out the function, and the hon. member addressed his supporters in fluent terms upon Welsh political matters. Last week the Unionists met in full force to formally Open their new club premises, the ceremony being performed by the Earl of Dartmouth, who was supported bv Lord Kenyon, the Hon. Laurence A. Brodrick, Colonel Corn- wallis West, and others. Following closely as this event did upon the Welsh Liberal Convention, the occasion afforded the speakers at the Unionist gathering an op- portunity of criticising the political utte- rances of their opponents, more especially regarding the House of Lords. Lord Ken- yon also took the opportunity of defending Sir Watkin Williams Wynn against the attacks levelled against him in certain quarters on the subject of his agreement with his tenants. The Colwyn Bay Unionists are justly proud of their new club which, no doubt, will be the means of in- fusing- renewed vigour into the rank and file of the party.

PERSONAL.

DUKE OF WESTMINSTER Al' SANDRINGIIAM.

FLINTSHIRE WATER DISPUTE.j

[No title]

"ALONG THE COAST." ------

--_-----_.--__----DENBIGHSHIRE…

COLWYN BAY LIBERAL ASSOCIATION,…

----_.------CATTLE STEALING…

THE MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS

CARNARVON.

CONWAY. --

Advertising

[No title]

PWLLHELI.

RUTHIN.

LLANFAIRFECHAN URBAN DIiSTlUCr…

THE LEASE OF A LLANDUDNO HOTEL.…

[No title]

----------------._------IS…

THE REMEDY OFFERED.

[No title]

LLYSFAEN PARISH CHURCH.

Family Notices

Advertising

CATTLE.

TALYCAFN SALE.

THE CHURCHES.

MOTORISTS AND THT UPKEEP OF…

CONWAY. --