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CYCLE AND MOTOR NOTES

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CYCLE AND MOTOR NOTES TWENTY-POUR HOURS' MOTOR RECORD. On Saturday on the new Brookiands motor track near Weybridge Mr. S. F. Edge not only carried out bis intention of driving for twenty- four hours at the rate of sixty miles an hour. bat added another six miles an hour to it. The task he had set himself was completed, so far as mile- age cnt. two and a quarter hours before time. A start was made at six o'clock on Friday even- ing, and at six o'clock on Saturday evening 1.581 miles 1,310 yards had been covered, the track having been traversed 572 times in achieving this record. The car. a six-cyiinder Napier, weighing 3,2771b., ran splendidly, and the run- ning was pretty even on the whole, though at times it reached seventy-two miles an hour. a fino piece of driving and a test of endurance which will require a good deal of ating. The previous record for the twenty-four hours was 1,096 3-16 miles by Messrs. Merz and Clemens, driving alternately at Indianapolis in 1S05, with An average speed of 47 miles an hour. THE MOTOR OMNIBUS NUISANCE. The Faddington Borough Council, having re- cently had many discussions regarding the nuisance caused by motor traffic in the borough, decided to take 'proceedings. A case was laid before Mr. Danckvrerts. K.C.. and in face of the opinion given by him legal proceedings were abandoned. Mr. Dan< kwerts, asked whether the Council, as the local authority, could legally take the matter up on the part of the ratepayers or on its own behalf a'- interested in the keeping op of the rateable value of the property in the borough, replied that the case which gave the widest latitude to the right to litigate at the expense of the rates was" R. v. White," 14, Queen's Bench Division, 358, but he was of opinion that it did not authorise the Council to engage in litigation at the expense of the rates on the ground suggested. The second question asked was whether the proceedings should be against one of the motor omnibus companies, and whether by indictment, injunction, or other- wise, and the answer was that the real difficulty was that the nuisance was not caused so much by the traffic of any particular company or per- ion, as by the conjoint traffic of more than one company or person acting independently of each other. As to what amount of nuisance as re- gards noise, smell, and structural damage would require to be proved and how far it would be necessary to fix any particular vehicle or class of vehicles with responsibility for it. particularly in the case of structural damage, Mr. Danckwerta said that in such cases there was great, if not insuperable, difficulty in undertaking any pro- ceedings, as for a public nuisance. Private in- juries, such as structural damage to houses, did not concern the Borough Council at all. Coun- sel was further of opinion that the only practi- cal course was to urge the Commissioner of Police to exercise more supervision and to bo more free in refusing or revoking licences. The Council now expresses the opinion that as the nuisance appears to be general throughout Lon- don a deputation representative of the whole of the Metropolitan Borough Councils should wait On the Commissioner of Police on the matter. CHANGE-SPEED GEAR FAILURE. The first accident which we have seen attribu- ted to the failure of a change-speed gear is re- corded as having taken place at Clapham, near ekipton, says a writes1 in the Field. It is stated that a local bicyclist was changing speed on a three-speed gear, when the mechanism jammed, .with the result that he was thrown on to his left elbow, which he seriously injured. Such an oc- currence is, of course, just possible. If at the moment when the sun wheel was locked to the axle one of the planet wheels became detached from its spindle, then the hub would be immov- ably connected to the axle, and motion would be arrested unless the change-speed device weffe one of those in which an ordinary free-wheel clutch is employed. An accident from this cause is, we have stated, almost, if not quite, unknown, but it must be remembered that the present year has teen the introduction to the public of a numbes of new gears, and it is very possible that some of these have been somewhat hastily put on to the market before receiving an adequate test of their behaviour on the road. It is also true that these devices often come in for a good deal of rough wear, for riders find themselves changing speed under conditions very different from those firesepbed by the makers, and if a repetition of this treatment should result in the breakage of & tooth in the gear the advantage of having the free-wheel device quite separate might make the difference between safety and an awkward tmash, TRAILERS AND THEIR DANGER.. The danger of using trailers in connection with motor-bicyclee was illustrated at an inquest that lately took place at Sherborne. A motor- bicyclist was taking his wife for a ride in cne of these vehicles when he heard a scraping noise behind, and, looking back. saw that the trailer was overturned and his wife lying in the road. The significant fact is that he was unable to ac- count for its upsetting, unless, he said, he had nerved or the trailer had caught on a stone. This statement points exactly to the nature of the danger. A pedalling bicyclist who draws a. trailer could not possibly, even in descending a bill, need the warning of noise to realise that anything had happened to his passenger. Yet had it not been for this scraping sound the motor-bicyclist would have gone on without even noticing what had happened. And it is especially to be noticed that he had been riding with a trailer for two years. We should be sorry to say that under the management of an unskilled rider a pedal-drawn trailer is alto- gether a safe vehicle, but, except downhill, an experienced rider is not likely to forget his freight to the extent of taking a turn too sharply having regard to the pace at which he is travelling. The labour of riding is enough to make him very sensitive to any variation in his load. The motor-bicyclist has not this safe- guard, and is very apt to misjudge the speed, and this accounts for the numerous trailer acci- dents that have taken place. The higher pace, moreover, renders the consequences of a spill far more serious than with a pedal-driven machine. The fatal attraction of the trailer lies in its cheapness. The contrivances can be picked up very cheaply; they are quickly attached to the bicycle, and take little room to store. Men who own motor bycls, therefore, are strongly tempted to buy trailers, but the investment proves too often a dear one. We have no hesita- tion in agreeing with the severe strictures which the coroner passed on the use of trailers with motor-bicycles. THE AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION. The annual meeting of the Automobile Asso- ciation was- held at the Trocadero Restaurant, London. Colonel W. J. Bosworth presided. The committee reported that the increase in member- ship had been most satisfactory, no fewer than 2,555 motorists having joined the association since the last annual meeting. Many new schemes put forward had been taken up with enthusiasm, in particular that concerning the Special Automobile Association policy of insur- ance arranged with Lloyds on terms advantage. ous to the members, and without any profit ac- cruing to the association. Most important and practical work had been done in the display of danger signs and names of villages, which had been, and were being, erected with the co-opera- tion of local councils and Automobile Associa- tion agents. It was hoped that this work would be largely increased during the coming year. The Road Department had grown from a mere handful of cyclist patrols to approximately 100, (between thirty and forty of whom were on the permanent staff. The system by been orga- nised on military lines, sergeants in charge of each main road being responsible for the work under the supervision of the road manager, whose work during the year had entailed travel- ling over 12,000 miles on a motor-car. In addi. tion to this two senior men had for the past few months assisted in linking up every main road throughout the country with local correspon- dents and agents, until the agency system ex- tended from Land's End to John o' Groat's. A DANGEROUS PRACTICE. Attention has recently been drawn to a very Common and dangerous practice which prevails amongst cyclists, writes Mr. Sturmey in Cycling. When travelling in parties, and upon being over- taken by motor-cars and other vehicles, instead of drawing in to their proper side of the road, they open out, so as to allow the oncoming hicHJ to pass through the middle of the group. I have noticed this peculiarity myself, especially when there arc many ladies in the party, and I can only conclude that a very large amount of ignorance exists amongst cyclists as to the recog- nised rules of conduct on the road, Years ago, cycling was first introduced and copapany tiding by clubs was universal, jt was found to be by far the best practice, either when meeting another vehicle or when overtaken, for the near side rider of a pair-i.e.. the one on the left-hand .ide-to quicken his paoe, whilst the off or right- band side rider dropped in behind him. If there Were more than two riding abreast, the third, fourth, and fifth dropped in behind the second in the same way. If this method of riding is under- stood and practised it quickly becomes second bature, and all the riders of a party drop into it automatically, but to scatter all over the road. a! is so frequently done, is dangerous to everyone, for the motorist, trotting horseman, or speed cyclist is never certain of what one or other of the scattering riders may or may not do, and a sadden change of mind on the part of one of them may bring disaster to all concerned.

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