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AIACHYNLLETH.

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AIACHYNLLETH. TESTIMONIAL.—Mr L. Fielden, the newly ap- pointed assistant master of the Board School, on his departure from Portmadoc was presented with a purse of gold by his friends and admirers as a token of their esteem. ASSESSMENT COMMITTEE. — A meeting ot the Union Assessment Committee was held on Wednes- day, under the presidency of Mr Edward Hughes, when appeals from Darowen, Cemmes, Llanwrin, Penegoes, Pennal, and Caereinion were considered. Several appeals were allowed, but the majority were adjourned. POSTAL SUCCESS.—Mr Hugh Jones, son of Mr David Jones, Penrallt, who was under the tuition of Mr Clements, postmaster at Machynlleth, for a period of eighteen years and who is now stationed at Colwyn Bay, has been successful in passing the civil service examination and is now eligible for appointment as clerk in the service. During the past twelve months four young men who have been under the tuition of Mr Clements have passed this examination. DEATH ABROAD.—News has been received of the death in Australia of Mi Richard Jones, son of Mrs Jones, Maengwyn House, and nephew to Mr E. Morgan, solicitor and late Local Government Board auditor. Mr Jones was well known in Machynlleth about fifteen or twenty years ago, and took a leading part in public life. He was a justice of the peace for the county and was a merchant by trade. In politics he was a keen Radical. He was a member of the Independent Chapel. He left Machynlleth for Australia in 1887. RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL.—A meeting of the I Council was held on Wednesday, when there were present Mr Edward Hughes, chairman; Messrs Ellis Hughes, David Evans, Richard Morgan, Lewis Lewis, John Jones, Rufus Owen, David Evans, clerk David Morgan, assistant clerk, and R. Williams, surveyor and inspector. A clerk, and R. Williams, surveyor and inspector. A letter was received from the Uwchygarreg Parish Council as to the right of the Council to take stones from Pantglas Quarry. It was agreed to communi- cate with Mr R. Gillart, agent to the Marchioness (D) of Londonderry, on the matter.—The sum of £6 was voted towards the repair of Cwmcarnedd road, it being understood that the Council did not take over the road.—The reports of the Surveyor and Inspector were read and considered. They contained nothing of public interest SHOW COMMITTEE.—A meeting of the Committee was held on Wednesday, when there were present Mr Ed. Hughes, chairman, presiding; Messrs Rd. Gillart, Sackville Phelps, J. Jones, Scuborycoed Ed. PrItchard, Rd. Ryder, M.Ryder, T. Carruthers, and Mr John Lewis, secretary. Mr G. Evans, Peniarth, and Mr H. Owen, Gwalchmai, also wrote consenting to act as judges at the show.—Mr Robert Williams Wynne, St. Asaph, Mr Alfred Grindell, Bristol, and Mr Pryse Pryse, Lodge Park, wrote regretting their inability to a jt.—It was agreed to write to Mr Arthur Evans, Bronwylfa, Wrexham I Mr Thompson, Mold Mr Green, Welshpool; Mr C. R. Williams, Dolmelynllyn Mr William Jones, Llanbrynmair, asking whether they would fill the vacancies.—Mr D. E. R. Griffith, hon. sec., who I was unavoidably absent, said he had been asked by some friends to insert a class or more for Welsh terriers. The persons who made the request were prepared to offer a guarantee.—Mr Richard Gillart thought the Committee should know whether the persons were subscribers or not, as they might desist giving subscriptions but simply give prizes. This would be a loss.—It was agreed that the acceptance of the offer should be left in the hands of the officials with Mr Gillart. It was resolved to appoint collectors of subscriptions at the next meet- ing. DROWNING FATALITY A sad fatality occurred about seven o'clock on Thursday evening, a young man named Hugh Wil- liam Evans, a chemist's assistant, meeting with his death whilst bathing in the Dovey. It is pre- sumed that the young man, who was accompanied by another youth named John Thomas, son of Mr Thomas, chemist, was seized with cramp. His companion made a heroic attempt to rescue him and nearly lost his own life as a result. Deceased, who was only seventeen years of age, had made many friends in the town and the news of his death caused them great grief. He was the son of Mr John Evans. Tanyfaen, Corris, and a nephew of Mr Hugh Davies, chemist, Machynlleth, to whom he was apprenticed. The inquest was held on Friday evening at the Town Hall by John Row- lands, Esq., coroner. The following were sworn on the jury :-Messrs Richard Rees (foreman), John Evans, John iTregoning-, Richard Roberts, David Williams, W. Pattison, Evan Jones, William Sadleir, Evan Reese, Richard Jones, John Thomas, John Morris, John Lumley, and John Davies! Evidence of identification was given by Mr Hugh Davies, chemist. He also stated that he last saw de- ceased alive at five o'clock on the previous evening. John Thomas, son of Mr John Thomas, chemist, said he was fishing near Felingerrig on Thursday and met Evans, who was a friend of his. He asked him where he was going and he replied, Nowhere in particular." Witness then asked him if he would come and bathe and he replied "Yes." They both walked down the river and went to Sir John's Pool in the Dovey. He (witness) undressed first, plunged into deep water, and swam across. Evans was standing on the bank and witness called out that if he intended coming in he had better look sharp, as he was not going to stay long in the water. Evans entered the river in shallow water, j dipped his head twice under water, and then swam across to witness. After resting a short time, Evans entered the water and swam in the direction of a tree which was growing out f the water. He thought Evans was "treading water" and he told him to be careful in landing, as there were some stones there. The next I thing he heard was Evans calling "Johnnie." He swam across te Evans and tried to catch hold of him by the hair, but failed, as the hair was too short. He then tried to catch hold of him from behind. Evans seemed to be conscious and c&ught hold of his (witness's) leg. He felt exhausted and his hands becoming numbed, he had to let go and he went up to the bank and shouted for help. He did all he could to get Evans to land, but failed. Evans was accustomed to bathing in the Dyssyini and in the sea, and was a fairly-good swimmer. The water was not cold. When he called for help, Mr B. Pearce, followed by Mr Pattinson* came up. j Mr Pearce took off his waders and a portion of his clothing and dived in, but his clothing prevented him from getting hold of deceased. He then came to the side, took off his shirt, and went in again and managed to get hold of the body by means of a fish- ing rod with a large reel on it.—Mr Benjamin Pearce, watchmaker, said he was fishing on the previous evening when he heard someone shouting. He remarked to a friend who was fishing close by, that he was afraid there was some- thing wrong. He went up the bank of the river and saw a boy running to meet him and shouting. He ran to the spot indicated by the boy, and took I eff his basket, coat, and waistcoat, &c. When he t reached Sir John's Pool he saw the previous wit- ness, who told him what was the matter. He had his waders and brogues on at the time, and, after taking off portions of his clothing he dived in, but failed to get hold of the body, as his clothes im- peded him. He came out of the water and took his shirt off and went in again, and, with the aid of a fishing rod and reel, he managed to get tne body cut. They then did all they possibly could to restore animation. The body felt warm when first taken out of the water. When he first saw J. Thomas, he was sitting on the bank and looked exhausted and excited. He knew the river well and considered these pools dangerous for bathing. -Dr Otho Roberts Travers of St. Leonard's said he was staying at the Lion Hotel for fishing. He was fishing in Ffridd Pool with a friend when his attention was drawn to a number of people on the < river bank. He did not think much of it at first, but ultimately he went to see what was the matter and he saw deceased with a number of people about him and some trying artificial respiration. He did all he could to restore respiration, although he thought it was hopeless. He noticed a slight abrasion on the hip. He surmised that deceased must have had cramp. In answer to the Coroner who asked what a person should do when in the water and seized with cramp, witness replied that on feeling cramp coming on the bather should turn over on his back and abstain from struggling.—The Coroner summed up and the jury brought in a verdict of Accidentally drowned while bathing." —A vote of condolence with the deceased's father was passed, on the motion of the Foreman who, in the course of his remarks, mentioned that a sister of Evans's was buried a fortnight ago. BOARD OF GUARDIANS, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14TH.—Present Mr David Evans, Pennal, chairman, presiding Mrs Lloyd, Machynlleth, vice-chairman Messrs John Rowlands and John Davies, Machynlleth Lewis Lewis, Pen- egoes John Jones, Darowen Richard Owen, Isygarreg Edward Hughes, Llanwrin John Owen and Meredith JoneB, Towyn William Jones, Aberdovey Rowland Jones, Careinion- fechan Rufus Owen, Llanbrynmair Messrs David Evans, clerk David Morgan, assistant clerk J. Jones, master and relieving officer and Daniel He well and William Jones, reliev- ing officers. Statistics. -Out-relief administered during the past fortnight Machynlleth district, per Mr J. Jones, jE16 16s Sd to 61 paupers. Darowen dis- trict, per Mr Daniel Howell, f39 19s to 14S paupers. Pennal district, per Mr Wm. Jpnes, JC27 5s lOd to 102 paupers Number of inmates in the House, 31; last year corresponding period, 35. Number of vagrants relieved during the past fortnight, 47 compared with 41 corresponding period last year. Report by Mr BlrcJiam.—The Clerk read the re- port of Mr Bircham, Local Government Board inspector, who visited the Workhouse last week. Mr Bircham said the inmates made no complaints and appeared to be contented and well-cared for. He recommended the Guardians to consider the question of supplying fittings and appliances for the sick wards. The women's yard appeared to be the only one for all classes of females, and it was also used as a drying ground. The yard was badly paved and altogether a most cheerless place. He suggested that a portion of the garden should be converted into a yard for the able-bodied women. Some improvement should be made to secure a better airing court for the old women and sick, and he thought the laundry should be improved at the same time. One woman of unsound mind should have a certificate from the Medical Officer, if the Medical Officer thought that the accommodation was sufficient for such a case. There was no pro- per accommodation for cases of unsound mind at the House. The female vagrant ward was really not fit for the purrose intended. Besides, it was badly placed, the vagrants thus mixing with the inmates. He thought the Guardians had better supply the few women and children that come for a night's lodging with lodging-house tickets.—The Master said there was a small yard in addition to Lhe one mentioned by Mr Bircham. The Inspector had evidently only seen the big yard.—It was agreed to consider the report at the next meeting. Next Meeting.—It was resolved to hold the next meeting of the Guardians that day month. The Boy David Lewis.—six applications were re- ceived to take the boy David Lewis, an inmate of the House, who is stated to be a sharp lad and an excellent scholar, to take him to service.—Mr Lewis Roberts, farmer, Aberdovey, offered to pay the lad f5 10s Mr John Williams, carrier, JE2 18s a year Mr G. E. Jones, farmer, Aberhoran, jE4 a year: Mr David Gillart, Towyn, f5 10s a year and Mr Griffiths, Aberllefeuny, £6 a year, Mr John Davies. painter, Machynlleth, offered to ap- prentice the lad for four years to the painting trade, paying him f4 a year in the second year, f8 in the third year, and E12 in the fourth year. All the applicants offered to provide the boy with food, lodging, and clothes.—Mr Gillart said he pro- posed employing the lad as a page.—A long discus- sion ensued as to whom the lad should be sent. —The Guardians were divided as to whether to accept the offer of Mr Davies. plumber, or that of Mr Giliart.—Mr Wm. Jones suggested that as the boy was a good scholar that he should be sent to the Intermediate School.—Mr John Jones We cannot send people to colleges on the money of the ratepayers.—Mr Rufus Owen Certainly not. —Mr William Jones: Why should workhouse children not have the same education as other children?—Mr John Jones Not on the money of the ratepayers. —The Clerk You could start a subscription list.— Mr William Jones: I am quite ready to subscribe. -Ultimately on the proposition of Mr Rufus Owen, seconded by Mr John Jones and Mr Richard Owen, it was agreed by eight to five to apprentice the boy to Mr Davies, painter, it being stated that the lad was desirous ot becoming a painter. Finanec-The Finance Committee recommended payment of f243 8s 6d county rate to Montgomery County Council, fl87 9s 6d to Merioneth County Council, and JE1 6s lOd in bills and the recommenda- tion was adopted. Maintenance of a Father.-A well-dressed young man from Llanwrin, who was ordered at the last Petty Sessions to pay 2a a week towards the main- tenance of his father, appeared before the Guardians and applied for a reduction in the amount.—It being suggested that it should be reduced to Is 6d a week, it was stated that defendant's brother, although married and with one child, paid his quota without a murmur. Defendant's father was in receipt of 4s 6d weekly relief.—It was agreed to refuse the application. A Towyn Case.—Mr Haydn Jones, J.P., Towyn, wrote with regard to the case of an old woman at Towyn whose relief had been reduced. She was old and infirm and after paying the rent— £ 4 a year —she had little left for food. He thought the Guardians should grant the same amount as before. —Mr John Owen, a guardian for Towyn, said he would look into the case. A Machynlleth Case, -Mr John Rowlands refer- red to the case of a woman pauper in Garshon-lane and said the Medical Officer ought to visit the House. He did not think she lived in healthy sur- roundings. He had a reason in bringing the matter forward.—It was agreed that the Medical Officer should visit the House and submit a report.—This was all the business. CAMBRIAN RAU,WAYS. -Approximate return of

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