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DENBIGHITES IN THE WAR.

VOLUNTEERS FOR THE WAR FROM…

I RUTHIN.

POLICE COURT. ]

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POLICE COURT. Monday, before Chancellor Buckeley Jones (in the chair), and Sir W. Grenville Williams. A YOUNG OFFENDER SENT TO A REFORMATORY.. John Edwards, the eleven years old son of Mary Edwards, Mwrog Streeti Ruthin, was charged with having, on the 25th of December (Christmas Day), stolen a pair of spectacles valued at 2s. 6d., from the house of Elizabeth Ann Piatt, who resides in the same street. The prisoner's mother (who is a widow), appeared with him in the dock. The prosecutrix is deaf, and the questions had to be put to her on a piece of paper. She stated, that the spectacles produced in court were lost from her house on Christmas day. She could put no value upon them, and only prized them because they belonged to her mother. About four o'clock on the 25th ult, she saw the spectacles in a glass dish which was placed on the top of a box on a table. She missed them the same day. She had seen the prisoner about her house that day, and on many other occasions, and had often to correct him. Robert Jones, 12 years of age, son of Thomas Jones, Mwrog Street, said that on Christmas day, the prisoner came to his house. At the time, witness was making tea for his little sister, and prisoner, asked for a piece of cur. rant bread. He gave him the bread, and the prisoner offered him the spectacles. He told prisoner that he did not want them, but the prisoner left them there. Thomas Jones, father of the last witness said that when the police constable came to his house, he knew nothing about the matter. Subsequently, however, he went to his bro- ther's house and got the spectacles, the latser having been carried from Jue house to another by the children. P.C. Howells proved having received the spectacles at Jones' house, and apprehending the prisoner. Sergt. Woollam said he received the prisoner into custody on Saturday, the 6th inst. He charged him with stealing the spectacles. Prisoner replied I gave them to Thos. Jones' boy for a piece of currant bread. I ran after a dog to Miss Platt's garden, and found them there. There was no one with me, and nobody saw me in the garden.' On being formally charged, prisoner, through his mother, elected to be tried summarily, and made a statement which amounted to a plea of 'not guilty.' For the defence, prisoner said he went to the prosecutor's garden after a dog, which was molesting the fowls. While there he found the spectacles on the ground. The m igistrates, after a brief consultation found the prisoner guilty, and the Chairman asked was he not one of the boys who were recently convicted of breaking into the Goods warehouse of the Railway station, and stealing therefrom a quantity of articles. Sergt. Woollam said that was so. This was the boy's third appearance before the court. He was charged, in June 1898, with stealing a bag of tools from a bicycle in the town. The case came on, but the prosecutor did not put in an appearance, and the prisoner was discharged. In January 1899, he was charged, with others of having broken into the railway goods ware- house, but was then let off although he was ordered to witness the whipping of three of his fellow prisoners. The Bench ordered him to be sent to the Bradwell Reformatory School for five years.

. DEATH OF MR. EVAN DAVIES,…

LETTER VII.

[No title]

TRAGEDY AT LLANGOLLEN.

THE REVENUE OF THE UNITED…

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(Eoirfsponbcncc.

VOLUNTEERISM VERSUS COMPULSION.

RUTHIN GAS.

THE FLINT MILK CASE.

COUNTY SCHOOL.