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DENBIGHITES IN THE WAR.

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DENBIGHITES IN THE WAR. The following are extracts of letters received by Mr. R. Parry, Maltster of this town, from Private J. E. Pritchard, of the C Company 1st Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers, now on ser- vice in South Africa, who at one time was a compositor in this office, and since he was on the reserve was employed by Mr. Parry. After alluding to family matters, Mr. Pritchard, in a letter dated the 30th of October last, written from the steamship 'Oriental,' and posted at Cape St. Vincent, says: We have had a very pleasant voyage so far. We left Pembroke Dock last Sunday night (the 22nd) about 10,30 for Southampton. We had a great reception at Pembroke before we left there, and all the way to Southampton, people were up all night at all the stations we went through. The sta- tions were beautifully decorated and lighted up. We arrived at Southampton about 10 o'clock on Monday morning, and got all our war material on board in a very short time. By about dinner time the docks were crowded by civilians, and there was great cheering and singing when we were about to start off at 3 o'clock in the afternoon. There would be about 2,000 troops on board, made up of different corps, and there were two other transports going out with us, numbering about the same each. We passed a place called Tenneriffe on the north-west coast of'Africa on Saturday (the 28th), which was the first bit of land we saw since we started from England. We stopped at the Cape of St. Vincent for coaling and pick- ing up the mail on Monday (the 30th), so we have some few days yet to sail before we arrive at our destination. They say we will arrive there on or before the 6th of November.' Writing again, in a letter dated the 1st of December, Mr. Pritchard says I have been through a little serious businesi5 since I wrote to you last. I daresay that you have seen it in the papers before now, about the shelling and firing we had on us by the Boers at a place called Mooi River on the 23rd of November. We were out that day for six or seven hours under fire. I was out in the first lot of sentries, and they began firing at the Mounted Infantry, a distance of about 900 yards from us. We had only a few wounded that day, as it came very misty and rained heavily towards evening, and so the fire stopped for that day. Next day, the Boers started shelling our camp heavily. The shells were dropping about the camp in all di- rections, so they shifted us, and we had to take up a position with our artillery firing at the Boers at a distance of 4,700 yards. Our artillery fired very heavily on the Boers for some time, so that they made the Boers shift away from there towards this place (Estcourt). That was all they did that day. Since the 20th we marched away by night from Mooi River to this place- a distance of 21 miles-to relieve the other troops who are here, so that they can proceed to Colenso. I daresay you have seen the result of the big day they had at Colenso on the 20th. The British made a good day of it there, taking everything in front of them. I daresay by the time you receive this letter we will be up to- wards Ladysmith. As we go up we stop in a place for a few days, and send on troops to the front as we go on. We had a lecture on the field the other day by our General-General Barton-and he said he had received a telegram from General Buller praising us for the work we had done from Mooi River to this place- moving through the enemy's country without being seen or fired at; and he was telling us that. we won't be long again in this expedition be- fore the enemy gets what he deserves.'

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