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CATTLE MARKETS, AND FAIRS.

WELSH FAIRS AND CATTLE MARKETS.

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VOLUNTEERS FOR THE WAR.

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VOLUNTEERS FOR THE WAR. THE patriotic enthusiasm of the Yeomanry and V olunteersextends throughout the whole of the country, and furnishes striking proof that the old fighting qualities of the British race still maintain, as strongly as ever. Whether in London, or in the provinces, the chief difficulty has been to sort out the men who have offered themselves, and there has been no difficulty in finding as many marksmen with the additional qualification of being unmarried, as can by any possibili- ty be accepted. The present war, in fact, will always be remembered for the re- markable number of Volunteers who have offered themselves for service, whether in the fighting line or for hospital work, or carrying on some work of mercv attended by all the hardships inseparable from a campaign six thousand miles from home. Many small contingents of the St. John Ambulance Brigade have left London, and a number of provincial towns, en route for South Africa, and the fact that they are non-combatants in no way detracts from the inestimable value of their services. The heroism of the bearers and others who succour the sick and wounded, is already a feature of the war, as it has been of all serious wars in which we have been engaged of late years, whether the enemy has been mainly an epidemic of disease, or man arrayed in arms, or a combination of both. As war becomes more deadly, the position of the non-combatants becomes more and more fraught with peril, but there are no laggards, and the response of many towns has proved that more men than can be ac- cepted are willing to volunteer their aid. For the past week or two there has been remarkable evidence of this fact in the Guildhall in London, where the Lord Mayor and sheriffs attended, with others, and wit- ness the enrolment of men for the city of London Volunteers. The Lord Mayor ad- dressing the recruits on one of these oc, casions, remarked with truth, that that date, the 1st of January, 190°: inaugura ted a new era -in our national history, the men before him having taken upon them- selves, deliberately and voluntarily, the hardihips and dangers incidental to a serious campaign. That perhaps was not the occasion for saying it, but there must have been, also in the minds of many pre- sent, the magnificent response which has been made by the city, and by many out- side its boundaries, to the appeal for funds to equip 4 the Lord Mayor's Own,' and for similar purposes. Some have offered their personal services, others their money, while not a few in various parts of the British Empire have hastened to proffer both. Except among a people of British stock on the other side of the Atlantic, there has been no such spectacle of spontaneous courage and devotion in the history of the world, and if any nation has been foolish enough to think that the British Empire is decrepit, it must surely have been con- vinced by the present demonstration that John Bull has taken a new lease of life. Our appreciation of the readiness of our auxiliary forces to stand shoulder to shoul- ders on the field of battle, with the regular membera of the army, is not to be taken as a proof that we believe in the justice of the war itself. The two things must be kept quite separate.

SLINGS AND ARROWS.

DENBIGH.

STABBING AFFRAY IN HENLLAN…

BOROUGH POLICE COURT.

DENBIGHSHIRE AND THE WAR.

♦ COUNTY POLICE COURT.

COUNTY SCHOOL.

Family Notices

WELSH MARKETS.