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RHUDDLAN.

SUDDEN DEATH OF LORD JUSTICE…

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SUDDEN DEATH OF LORD JUSTICE CHITTY. AN INTERESTING CAREER. The English Bench has lost one of its most dis- tinguished members in the person of Lord Justice Chitty, who died at his London residence in Queen's- gate-gardens, S.W., on the afternoon of the 15th inst. after an illness lasting only three days. On Friday of last week his lordship was performing his usual duties in court, apparently in the best of health, but on the following day, feeling that he had a slight chill, he remained at his residence, and was engaged for the greater part of the day in writing four judgments. In the evening Sir Joseph retired to rest somewhat early, and no more alarm- ing symptoms had developed then than a slight attack of influenza. On Sunday morning, however, it became evident that his lordship's condition was more serious than had been anticipated, and Dr. Aikin, the family doctor, was in frequent attendance. Throughout Monday there was no great change in the patient's health, and on Tuesday there was a distinct sign of improvement. But this, unfor- tunately, was not maintained, and it was thought advisable to have a consultation of doctors. Sir Douglas Powell was accordingly summoned, and he, together with Dr. Aikin, spent some considerable time with the patient. During Tuesday and Wed- nesday two of the sons and the only daughter of de- ceased remained with their father alternately, but, although his position was now regarded as dan- gerous, it was not thought that the final issue was so close at hand. When, therefore, the death took place, as it did about half-past three on Wednesday afternoon, the tidings came as a thunder clap. Failure of the heart's action, following upon the prostra- tion naturally caused by an attack of influenza, was declared to be the cause of death. The patient's age-he being in his 71st year—was natur- ally greatly against him. Lady Chitty and her family can scarcely realise that Sir Joseph, who five days since was on the Bench, and, as all supposed, in good health, has passed away. One of his sons informed a representative that Sir Joseph had invariably, for many years, enjoyed excellent health. His illness was surprising to them all, and the death had seemed almost incredible to those who had been around him during the last few days of his life. The late judge came of a legal stock, his father having been a barrister of the Inner Temple. He was born in London 71 years ago, and received his education at Eton and at Balliol College, Oxford. He took his B.A. degree in 1851, became a Fellow of Exeter College in the following year, and in 1854 proceeded to his M.A. For three years he stroked the Dark Blue craft in the University Boat Race, and his continued interest in rowing was evidenced by the fact that for some years he acted as umpire in the annual contest on the Thames > between the two Universities. He entered himself at Lincoln's-inn, and in 1856 was called to the Bar, taking silk 18 years later, and being made a Bencher of his Inn in 1875, and treasurer only four years ago. As a barrister he enjoyed a very extensive and lucrative practice in the Rolls Court, of which for some years he was the leader, and in his leisure time actively supported the volun- teer movement by accepting a commission in the Inns of Court Rifles. At the general election of 1880 Mr. Chitty, as he then was, stood for Oxford City in the Liberal interest in company with Sir William Harcourt, and secured the second seat-the city at that time returned two members—by the narrow majority of 10 over the single Conservative candidate, Mr. A. W. Hall. The late judge did not remain very long in the House of Commons, as in 1881 he was appointed a judge of the Chancery Division of the High Court of Justice, in place of Sir George Jessell, the Master of the Rolls., In 1897 Justice Chitty was made a Lord Justice, and sworn of the Privy Council. The late judge married, in 1858, Clara Jessie, sixth daughter of the late Sir Frederick Pollock, the first baronet,, who was Lord Chief Baron of the old Court of Exchequer, and he leaves four sons and a daughter.

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