Hide Articles List

18 articles on this Page

darkening. ........."--":"""--"""'--""--".............--,--,,........-------",------,-"",--..-

THE RHYDONEN CASE.

[No title]

----I AN IRISH UNIVERSITY.

News
Cite
Share

AN IRISH UNIVERSITY. A conference to consider the present aspect of the Roman Catholic University question was held on Wednesday in Dublin. The Lord Mayor presided, and there was a large attendance, including many of the Roman Catholic clergy. Lord Emly, in moving a resolution demanding such a change in the system of collegiate and Univer- sity education as will place on a footing of equality with their fellow-countrymen those who entertain conscientious religious objections to the present system, said no one in that meeting could mention an instance of spontaneous justice done by England to Ireland. Did they expect their English masters to reverse their policy now ? They would never do anything of the kind, and unless the Catholic people put something stiffer than argument into this question they might as well stay at home. The resolution was carried. Lord Powerscourt, in moving a resolu- tion expressing disappointment that the Govern- ment had not yet taken steps to settle the ques- tion, referred to the proposals embodied in Mr. Balfour's letter as a great step in advance, thought they ought to be accepted by the Roman Catholics, and doubted whether the House of Commons would ever consent to more radical legislative action than was suggested by Mr. Balfour. Mr. John Dillon, M.P., seconded the resolution. He denied that the question was mainly an ecclesiastical one, or that the demand of the Roman Catholics was unreasonable or bigoted. Mr. Balfour had stated that the Govern- ment would not take up the matter as a party question. That was a grave and important declara- tion, but it would be ungenerous in the Irish people not to recognize the immense service that had been rendered to the cause of Catholic education in Ireland by Mr. Balfour's utterances, and he urged that at the meeting of Catholic Bishops about to be held to consider the subject Mr. Balfour's scheme should receive generous consideration. The resolution was carried. Dr. Healy, Roman Catholic Bishop of Clonfert, in moving a resolution for the appointment of a sub-committee of Irish members to press the question on the attention of Parliament during the coming Session, spoke of the unanimity of feeling on the subject. If all Irishmen joined in demanding full justice and equal rights for all, that demand must be conceded. He would not dis- cuss the proposals of Mr. Balfour's letter, but they must all admit that he had shown an earnest and sincere anxiety to settle the question. The bishops had shown a similar desire, and had, in fact, reduced their demands to the minimum that could be accepted without sacrifice of principle. The resolution was adopted. Colonel Saunderson, M.P., addressing his constituents at Portsdown, on Tuesday night, ex- pressed strong opposition to the idea of establishing a Roman Catholic University in Ireland. He and those who agreed with him were opposed to such a proposal because they were Protestants, and because they believed it would be bad for Ireland.

INVESTITURE AT OSBORNE.

[No title]

ITHE LEADERSHIP OF THEI LIBERAL…

FUNERAL OF MRS. PARKER.

-."1! ANOTHER PEERAGE DISPUTED.

CHAMBERS OF AGRICULTURE.

[No title]

LAWLESSNESS IN THE CHURCB.

DEATH OF DR. BERRY.

FOUR SOLDIERS DROWNED.

FATAL RAILWAY COLLISION.

LADY ABERDEEN AND WOMEN WORKERS.

[No title]

Advertising