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DISPUTE ABOUT A HOLYWELL HOTEL.…

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CURRENT POLITICS.

THE LATE BROTHER PRINCE.

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A FIREMAN BURNED TO DEATH.

THE FRENCH AMBASSADOR ON PEACE.

FEMALE ARTISTS.

BARKING DISASTER.

SENTENCE ON "HARRY THE VALET."

THE GORDON MEMORIAL COLLEGE.

IN A STORM ON HELVELLYN.

[No title]

AFRICAN FIGHTING,

MAJOR MACDONALDS REPORT.

I OLD-AGE PENSIONS.

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OLD-AGE PENSIONS. MR. LOGAN, M.P., SUGGESTS A SCHEME. Mr. J. W. Logan, M.P., for the Harborough Divi- sion of Leicestershire, speaking at Marked Har- borough on Tuesday night, said the ill-paid workers in particular had believed the platform speeches concerning old-age pensions, and had hoped to witness legislation on the subject which would render them that aid in avoiding the workhouse after a life of toil and privation which they were unable to provide for themselves. They had now to face the position that, as the cry had served its purpose, all sorts of insurmountable obstacles pre- sented themselves. However, the bogies had not decreased the desire, the expectation, nor, he hoped. the determination that a pension scheme should become an accomplished fact. The Chancellor of the Exchequer and Mr. Chamberlain, both of whom advocated old-age pensions in 1895, one of them having a scheme which everybody could under- stand, now saw nothing but of the difficulties, and it therefore became a matter for humbler mortals to deal with. Mr. Chamberlain once said: The .people must find the solution, and for my part I have so much confidence that I believe that what the wise and learned have failed to accom- plish the poor and lowly will achieve for them- selves." It was in accordance with that belief that he (Mr. Logan) had endeavoured to find a method of overcoming the great diffic Lilt y-tliat of ways and means. He was not abandoning the principle that the means should be furnished by the land, for a far-reaching reform of our land system would not only provide the means, but would be the remedy for pauperism. He was, however, temporarily waiving that contention in the interests of the men and women who had reached the age of sixty-five, and those fast approaching that, age, as he recognised that the land question was in its infancy. He knew of no royal road to revenue, and had no plan for obtaining money from any but the usual sotirce-the pockets of the people. To give 5s. per week to each person who had now attained the age of 65 would require X26,000,000 sterling. That was the annual addition to revenue needed. He suggested a tax averaging 4d. per gallon, or one halfpenny per pint, on beer, which would produce nearly £ 21,000,000 sterling 3s. per gallon on spirits, producing over £ 6,000,000 4s. per gallon on wine, producing over E3,600,000- a total exceeding £ 30,000,000. He had taken those articles because they were not in any sense necessaries, but often harmful, and the people who could afford to indulge in them would not be injured by having to pay a little extra. There remained other luxuries of the same class, such as racehorses, hunters, and precious stones, which might be made to contribute. If the people were willing to provide the means in the manner suggested, nobody had the right to object, the details should be easy of arrange- ment, and old-age pensions might be immediately available. His scheme might not be the best, but it was the first to face the one real difficulty.

EXCESSIVE IMPORTS.

MR. LEOPOLD DE ROTHSCHILD…

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