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DISPUTE ABOUT A HOLYWELL HOTEL.…

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CURRENT POLITICS.

THE LATE BROTHER PRINCE.

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A FIREMAN BURNED TO DEATH.

THE FRENCH AMBASSADOR ON PEACE.

FEMALE ARTISTS.

BARKING DISASTER.

SENTENCE ON "HARRY THE VALET."

THE GORDON MEMORIAL COLLEGE.

IN A STORM ON HELVELLYN.

[No title]

AFRICAN FIGHTING,

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AFRICAN FIGHTING, A LIEUTENANT SENT HOME TO DIE. The Liverpool coroner held an inquiry on Wednes- day into the death of Eustace Montague Town end, aged 28, a lieutenant in the troops commissioned by the Royal Niger Company in West Africa. Miss Ada Eustace Townend, of Lorna-road, Hove, Brighton, a sister of deceased, said he went out to Africa in November, 1897. Last month she received a letter from the Niger Company, London, saying that her brother had been injured in an engagement with some natives and was being sent home in the steamship Olinda. This vessel arrived at Liverpool on December 31, and deceased was taken to the Royal Infirmary, where she subsequently saw him. He was, however, too indisposed to give a proper account of his injuries in fact, he was never really conscious, and died last Saturday in her presence. Miss Louisa Annie Sidkey, Hockarden, St. Mary Cray, Kent, a friend of deceased, said that (in November be wrote to tell her that he had been fighting against rebellious natives, but had not been wounded. He also wrote to say that he would be fighting again the next day. About a week before Christmas she received information that he was wounded, and that he was being sent home in the Olinda. Witness came to Liverpool with deceased's sister. John Harry Watson, house surgeon, Roy|§3nfir- marv, said deceased was admitted to the institution on December 31. Dr. Nesbitt, surgeon of the Olinda, accompanied him. Deceased was weak, and two gunshot wounds were discovered in his left side. He was too ill to give any details of his injuries. Dr. Nesbitt said deceased had led a body of troops against a body of natives who were entrenched in a kind of ditch. The nature of that charge compelled the troops to advance upon the enemy in single file; deceased was at the head. When about two yards from the trenches one of the natives shot him in his left side, and he fell immediately. The rebel who had fired the shot was killed by a brother officer, Lieut. Wake. It was seen that deceased's recovery was almost hopeless, though he improved somewhat as the result of operations. A relapse followed, he gradually sank, and died on the day stated. The cause of death was exhaustion, brought about by gun- ahot wounds. The Coroner said it was necessary to hold an inquest to get rid of legal difficulties which might arise. The jury found that deceased had died from ex- haustion, following on gunshot wounds, but how the wounds were caused there was no evidence to show.

MAJOR MACDONALDS REPORT.

I OLD-AGE PENSIONS.

EXCESSIVE IMPORTS.

MR. LEOPOLD DE ROTHSCHILD…

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