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DISPUTE ABOUT A HOLYWELL HOTEL.…

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CURRENT POLITICS.

THE LATE BROTHER PRINCE.

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A FIREMAN BURNED TO DEATH.

THE FRENCH AMBASSADOR ON PEACE.

FEMALE ARTISTS.

BARKING DISASTER.

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BARKING DISASTER. Dr. Ambrose, the coroner for the metropolitan area of South Essex, resumed his inquiry on Tuesday, at the Public Office, Barking, on the bodies of eight victims of the Barking explosion. Their names were George Pratten, Walter Taylor, Alfred Leslie Hume, Archibald Burness, Edward Lloyd, Alfred Grant, William Thomas Marshall, and Henry Page. Mr. Donald Gordon, the manager of the works, was called and repeated the evidence given at the inquest last week at Poplar. The boiler, he said, was removed from a vessel in 1890 to repair it, and to replace it by a larger boiler. At the beginning of 1897 the boiler was repaired and was tested by steam pressure at 901b. per square inch. The boiler must have been above 25 years old. The Coroner: Have you heard of the boiler being. defective anywhere ? Witness: None whatever. The Coroner: Have you any theory to offer of your own about the explosion r- Witness: No, sir. Continuing, witness said the safety valves had not been overhauled since 1897. There was no engineer on the works so far as one was considered an engineer by examination. Witness was under the impression that he was a practical engineer, however. The boiler was a fair steaming one. Henry Holt, of 3, George-street, boiler maker, said he had frequently tested the boiler since it had been on the works in 1892. Mr. Strohmeyer, mechanical engineer and chief inspector of the Manchester Steam Insurance Association, was called by the coroner to give ex- pert evidence. On January 9 he visited the scene of the disaster, and made an examination of the shattered portions of the boiler which had been collected under the orders of the Board of Trade. He found that the boiler was lOft., 6in. in diameter, and three-quarters of an inch thick. Although the welded joints were not so strong as riveted joints the welding in con- nection with this boiler had not given way. The fracture passed through the solid plate, and the ] thickness of the line of the point at the fracture was three-quarters of an inch. The shell plate of the boiler might have burst at a pressure of 5001b. or 5501b. per square inch. The primary fracture did not occur in the furnace or in the combustion chamber. The shell might pro- bably have given way at a pressure of 4001b. at the square inch. There was a remote possibility that the works of the safety valve had become jammed. Had the valves been blowing off before the accident it was more than probable that they must have become inoperative just before the explosion occurred. No fault could be found in the construction of the boiler. His opinion was that the pressure which caused the explosion was probably about 4001b. to the square inch, or it might have been more. How it was possible to accumulate this he was unable to state at the present time. The safety valves had not, been used, from their appearance, since it was last over- hauled. Witness had also examined the damage done by the explosion, and bad gathered that the velocity must have been from 300ft. to 400ft. per second, and the pressure wave must have been 4001b. to 5001b. per square inch. The calcula- tions he had made as to the explosion from the de- struction in the neighbourhood led him to the con- clusion that the pressure at which the boiler had burst was that which he had mentioned. George Pratten said that on the day of the explo- sion the gauge registered 101b. of steam. Frank Ferrier, who assisted the deceased Burness, said that while he screwed down the valve his col- league said lie thought there was something under- neath it, adding that Mr. Gordon had told him that if there was any dirt under the valves they would have had to take the valves out and see to it. The valve was not working freely at that time although there were only 51b. pressure indicated. After further evidence of an unimportant cha- Tacter had been given, the inquiry was arjourned for it fortnight.

SENTENCE ON "HARRY THE VALET."

THE GORDON MEMORIAL COLLEGE.

IN A STORM ON HELVELLYN.

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AFRICAN FIGHTING,

MAJOR MACDONALDS REPORT.

I OLD-AGE PENSIONS.

EXCESSIVE IMPORTS.

MR. LEOPOLD DE ROTHSCHILD…

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