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[No title]

SOUTH WALES MINERS.I

THE WORK OF THE TEACHER.

THE PHILIPPINES.

LATE MRS. CHARLES MATHEWS.¡

FOR LIVERPOOL CWSUMPTIYES.

THE SUGAR BOUNTIES.

TENNYSON MEMORIAL

[No title]

ACCIDENT TO A JUDGE.

HEROIC RESCUE,

CONGO TROOPS DEFEATED.

NEW ADMIRALS

.A STRANGE SIGHT.

EXECUTION AT KILKENNY.

lOOLONEL MATHIAS ON THE FIGHT…

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lOOLONEL MATHIAS ON THE FIGHT AT DARGAI. As already reported the officers of the 1st Batta- lion Gordon Highlanders, who have lately returned from active service on the Indian frontier, were on Tuesday evening the guests of the Caledonian Club in London. H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, theColonel- in-Chief of the regiment, honoured the club by his presence. The chair was occupied by the Earl of March, who, in proposing the toast of the evening, The Gordon Highlanders," referred to the universal admiration which had been excited by the gallant conduct of the gay Gordons in the recent frontier campaign. The toast was received with the greatest enthusiasm, and Ronald Mackenzie, piper to the Duke of Richmoud, of Gordon, played the Cock o' the North," and the "Haughs of Cromdale." In responding on behalf of his regiment and him- self, Colonel Mathias thanked the company for the cordial manner in which they had received the toast. He remembered shortly after Dargai, some of the English papers recommended him never to make another speech. That seemed to him most excellent advice, but unfortunately he had not been able "to take it." The episode of Dargai caught hold of the imagination of the British public, and remained in its memory, but he could assure them that that rush of four or five minutes into what looked like certain death, was not half so bad as what they went through afterwards. At Dargai they were going straight for the foe in the good old British way; afterwards they seldom. saw many of the enemy, but the enemy always saw them. He did not mind stating that he strongly objected to being shot at from behind, and when bullets dropped in on one casually from the other three sides as well, it was very annoying indeed. He did not think that anyone who marched down the Bara Valley with the 2nd Divi- sion was likely to forget it. It tried all, both British and native, to the utmost. While passing he desired to pay a tribute of praise to the grand native army of Northern India, with which he had been so closely connected for the last six years, and which Lord Roberts, and more recently Sir G. White, did so much to organise and bring to perfection. No words of his could express what he felt about them. No one could realise, except by serving with them in the field, what grand fighters, and what good fellows they were, true to their salt, and loyal till death. The Caledonian Club in honouring them that night not only honoured the Gordon Highlanders, but the whole army, those Soldiers of the Queen of all colours, and of all creeds-through out the empire, who, when- ever there was-any fighting on in any corner of the World, came up smiling to the call of time." The Prince of Wales in rising to propose the health of the chairman, cordially endorsed all that had been said by the gallant colonel, and whilst re- gretting that he had never had the privilege of serving with the Indian troops on active service, he said he had often seen' them in large bodies, and was confi- dent that the Queen had no finer soldiers.

[No title]

Vi < TH hi: STUNS illURDERER…

SIR JOHN GORST AT BRADFORD.:

RUSKIN HALL AT OXFORD.j

REFUSED A KISS.

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THE RITUALIST CONTROVERSY.

._--------------_--IGRUESOME…

__-,-THE CONGO REVERSE.

! CONSERVATIVES AND SOCIAL…

en KM 1ST BURNED TO DEATH.

[No title]