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fethening. [If any reader who isin a difficulty with reference to his garden, will write directly to the ad- dress given beneath, his queries will be an- swered, free of charge, and by return of post. — h>!TORj. THE VEGETABLE GARDEN. This is a very busy month indeed for the gardener, as almost all kinds of vegetable seeds can be sown out of doors, provided the weather and soil be dry. It is better, however, to wait until April if the ground is at all pasty. Sow wide breadths of hardy winter greens soon, and make sowings of several different kinds of cabbages also. Surplus plants will come in for patching, and for less fortunate neighbours. It is almost impossible tie use too much manure in the preparation of seed beds for plants of the cabbage tribe. An early sow- ing of gem or scarlet horn carrot should be made soon on a warm border, and the seedlings may require the shelter of old lights and mats for a time. It is not safe to sow the main crop until the weather has settled down warmly in April. Plant out autumn-sown cauliflowers from the frames whenever weather permits, placing them in the very richest plots in the garden. Chives may be divided now, and the roots must be planted in ground which has not been used for any variety of the onion family for a long time. Herbs also may be divided, and of many kinds the seeds may be sown in rather poor, dry borders. The principal point in their culture is to thin out the seedlings early and boldly. The main crop of onions must be got in soon on rich mellow ground, the bed being dug carefully over before sowing. Break all lumps with a spade, and tread over light soil to firm or consolidate it, afterwards lighly scratching over the surface with a rake. Sow the seed in drills from six to twelve inches apart, according to the size of the variety selec- ted, and the shallower the drills are made for keeping onions the better they will do. Cover very lightly with fine earth, again touch over with a rake, and gently pat over the bed with the back of a spade if the soil lie nice and dry. On heavy ground this last operation should be omitted entirely. Few vegetables are so pala- table and wholesome as parsnips, and few are so easily grown. The only preparation re- quired is deep digging. Get the seed in as soon as possible now in shallow drills eighteen inches apart, placing two or three seeds in a group every six inches along the drills. Sow main- crop and tall peas, choosing the finest marrow- fat kinds, and place the rows so wide apart3 that they will not shade one another when grown to their full height. It is an excellent plan to grow cabbages, broccoli, potatoes, &c.. between the rows. Towards bbe middle and end of the month, the main crop of potatoes may be got in, but we prefer early April for the work. Plant out lettuces from the frames, and make extensive sowings in deep, good soil, which has been well manured. Sea kale plan- tations can be made at once, the roots being planted two feet apart, so that the crowns are 2 inches under the surface. Finish up by tread- ing the ground firmly down. Seeds are best sown in April, though they may be put in now in drills 13 inches asunder and some two inches deep. The seedlings must be thinned out early to 10 inches asunder in the lines, and weeds should be scrupulously kept down. Sow abun- dance of spinach in deep, giood soil, not; forget- ting the perpetual variety. For tomato plants to fruit in the open, make a sowing in pots filled with a lightish compost of leaf-mould, loam and sand. Cover the seeds lightly with fine earth, and start in a temperature of about 60 or 65 degrees. When the seedlings are large enough to handle, move them singly to small p(,t.g, and shade them for a few days if neces- sary. Keep them stocky. by placing them on shelves near the glass, and take care they suffer no check. The main crop of leeks should be sown in rich, good soil, and garlic may still be planted. Sow celery seeds on a mild" hot-bed, pricking out the plants in to a mellow half-spent bed when they are large enough to be moved without injury. Give free ventilation whenever the weather permits, and supply plenty of water. Plant out broad beans from under glass, and sow for main and late supplies in double rows three feet apart, with nine inches between the double rows; cover three or four inches deep. Brussels sprouts and broccoli may be sown at once on warno borders, and Jerusalem artichoke sets can be planted in deep soil in a sunny position. Prepare the hot-bed for cu- cumbers, using plenty of manme and if possi- ble some decaying leaves in the centre of the heap, which ought to be sufficiently large to project a foot round the edges of the frame. Put the frame on, and when the bed has set- tled down to a steady temperature, add nine inches of good, mellow loam over the top of it. SPECIAL NOTICE. In response to many hundreds of requests, Messrs. Toogood and Sons have just prepared a book, entitled The Culture of Vegetables for Prizes, Pleasure, and Profit,' to be sold at actual cost price, 6d. only, to readers of our gardening notes. It embodies the results of a century's practical work on a very large scale at our experimental farm, and is divided into three parts, the first of which treats of the soil, its composition, amelioration, methods of work- ing, treatment, &c.; the composition of various fertilizers, with hints on their application, &c. garden pests, the methods of prevention and remedy, &c., &c. The second portion contains full cultural directions for every kind of vege- table, each being discussed under the following headings :-Soil, manuring, varieties, sowing, culture, storing, cooking, forcing, exhibiting, special culture for exhibition, pests, &c., &c., very full instructions being given on all these points. The last portion of the work, in addi tion to a monthly calendar of gardening opera- tions, contains in tabulated form, to admit of instant reference, a complete list of all the sow ings and plantings which can be made in the kitchen garden during each month, together with the average date at which each crop will be fit for consumption. Instructions as to how and where each sowing or planting should be made, are added. This is, of course, a very special feature, and its preparation has involved an amount;of labour which can only be described as enormous. Our object in printing the book was to provide at the lowest possible price a work which should contain everything that gar- deners could require to know about the culture of various vegetables, and we would add that no personal trouble has been spared to attain this end. We have the less hesitation in re commending it to the notice of our readers in thae we do not benefit in any way by its pub- lication or sale. The first edition was practi cally sold on the day of publication, but our printing department hope to be able to supply copies again in a few days. The work coil tains about 130 pages. E. KEMP TOOGOOI), F.R.H.S., pro Toogood and Sons, The Royal Seed Establishment, Southampton.

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