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CAMBRIAN GOSSIP.

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CAMBRIAN GOSSIP. Professor Anwyl is of opinion that for purity and beauty the Welsh pennillion de- serve to be placed side by side with, if not even higher than, the Greek anthology. They form, indeed, one of the most curious anthologies in any literature. » 9 • In the Beecher Memorial Chapel at Brooklyn, there is a Welsh window to the memory of Henry Ward Beecher, who claimed Welsh descent on his mother's side. The window illustrates the well-known hymn by Williams of Pant-y celyn, Argl w)Tdd ar- wain drwy'r anialwch.' • • It is estimated that two-thirds of the clerks employed as foreign correspondents in Liverpool mercantile offices are Welsh men. The Welsh lad who starts life as a bilinguist has an immense advantage over the monoglot English boy in the acquisition of foreign languages. « » Excuses of a very humorous kind are frequently offered to the magisterial Bench by habitual topers, At a South Wales town the other day an aged defendant pleaded hard for a lenient treatment, 'I am very sorry, your Worships,' he said, but I just took a drop of extra quality « # The Rev. W. Bingley, in his Customs of the Welsh,'states that formerly it wa.3 usual in some parts of North Wales, whenever the name of the devil occurred, for the congre- gation to spit on the floor, and when the name of Judas was mentioned to express their abhorrence of him by striking their breasts. »* Wales is frequently represented in one or other of the competing crews in the Univer sity boat race, and this year the Principality will be specially interested in the doings of the Cambridge eight from the fact that they are being coached for the great event by Mr. H. Trevor Jones, a young vvelshman from the neighbourhood of Wrexham. » » » In a little churchyard near Llanymynach is a tombstone with these lines upon it: In crossing o'er the fatal bridge, John Morgan he was slain, But it was not by mortal hand, But by a railway train. John Morgan was the huntsman to the Ta- natside Harriers, and paid the capital pen- alty for taking a short cut along the Cam- brian line. « The significance of the change which has recently come over Welsh Church affairs, particularly in the recognition of native Welshmen like Canon Owen, may be judged from the inscription upon the memorial win- dow in St. Asaph Cathedral to Jos. Hughes, for 18 years Bishop of that diocese. The in- scription says:—' He was the first Welsh- man for upwards of a century and a half raised to the Episcopate in Wales. it.. Among the living authors who are repre sented in the new hymn book of the Welsh Calvinistic Methodists are the Venerable Archdeacon Howell (Llaiodden), Miss S. J. Rees (Cranogwen), the Rev. Evan Rees (By fed), Mr. John Davies (Gwyneddon), the Revs. Dr. Cynhafal Jones, 0. G. Owen (Ala- fon), R. R. Morris (Rhisiarb ap Gwilym), Thomas Levi (Aberystwyth), and William Williams (Gwilym ap Gwilym Lleyn). It is believed that only one pair ol that extremely rare British bird the kite now breed annually on the Welsh coast, and every year a grasping professional egg col- lee- r, robs their nest. Accordingly, the Messis- Keart-n, whose book on 'British Birds' Nest and Eggs' is so well-known, are trying to obtain subscriptions in order to hire a coupT1^ of watchers to protect the kites this vea £ ,;t; We hope they will suc- ceed. » The custom of Irish labourers to come over to England for harvest time is well- known, but it is not generally known that Welsh labourers formerly went into England for the harvest season just in the same way. That they did so, however, is proved by the fact that in 1350 a statute was passed for regulating labour, and for granting permis- sion to Welshmen, in the month of August only, to proceed into England to work. m » • Mr. Lewis Jones's volume of Caniadau Cymru,' a notice of which rocently appeared in this column, will reach the subscribers the first week in March. It is a beautifully printed book bound in limp vellum, and is beyond doubt the handsomest collection of Welsh poems yet issued, the volume con- taining over 320 pages, with a long intro- duction and biographical notes by Mr. Jones A cheaper edition, it is said, will shortly be issued to the public. ♦ # • The 'Davies Lecture' on 'Hebrew Theo- logy,' delivered last year at Liverpool by the Rev. Dr. J. Cynddylan Jones, witI short- ly be published in two volumes. The vol- umes will contain considerably -more than was delivered by Dr. Jones. The lec- ture in its published form will be divided into three parts—(1) Pre-Mosaic Theology (2), Mosaic Theology, and (3) Prophetic Theo- logy. Some advanced theologists say that the lecture is antiquated and conservative, f* « <» Some astonishment has been expressed in certain quarters at the non-appearance in the new hymnal of the Welsh Calvinistic Methodists of the celebrated hymns of lliraethog, and lest captious critics may at- tribute this to sectarian narrowness it is well that it should be known that every effort was made to include some of Hiraeth- og's best hymns in the collection, but per- mission to do so was steadfastly refused by the firm that owns the copyright Mr. Owen Owen, M.A., of Oswestry, the new chief inspector of the Welsh Intermedi- ate schools, is a keen musician. He was one of the early pioneers of the tonic sol-fa movement in Wales, and obtained the ad- vanced certificate of the Tonic Sol-fa Col- lege in 1869, being the second in Wales to I' pass that examination. In 1870, he obtained a certificate in elementary musieal composi- tion, being second in the merits list of stu- I dents for that year. Mr. Owen was prece- ded in these higher examination only by Mr. David Jenkins, of Aberystwyth, who passed for the advanced certificate in 1867, and has since risen to the distinction of Mus. Bac., Cantab. One of Mr. Owen's hymn tunes, Llaniestyn (so called after his native parish), is one of the most fre- quently sung tunes in Wales at the present day. • • • Mr. Lloyd-George's instruction to the Committee of the House of Commons on the Education Bill on Thursday afternoon (says a correspondent), proposing that some mea- sure of local control should Ibe introduced into the measure, was the only one which was held by thf* Speaker to be in good order. Mr. George has already shown that his hand has lost none of its cunning in drafting such resolutions. His speech in moving the in- struction was studiously moderate in tone and conciliatory in manner, and was listened to with deference by a crowded House. This restraint gained for the instruction a good deal of support from the Tory benches, and the Liberal leaders who sat on the front Opposition bench backed it up by their unanimous support. Mr. Brynmor Jones broke silence for the first time this session by making an effective speech after dinner.

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