Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

18 articles on this Page

Advertising

Rhymney Valley Echoes.

A DAILY NUISANCE.

Proposed Rhymney Valley Water…

NERVOUS BREAKDOWN.I

Advertising

Prize Distribution at Hengoed.…

Advertising

Advertising

Hengoed Co unty School.II

Advertising

."1......r—— HENGOED POLICE…

Advertising

.....-.r.......-,AI.-----v....;..'----...-----:-;--.-;.'…

,'Anti-Christian Socalists.…

[No title]

Advertising

Prize Distribution at Hengoed.…

News
Cite
Share

TRAINING FOR HOME DUTIES. Mr, A. D. Badger, of the Monmouthshire County Council, in the course of a very prac- tical address, congratulated those present on the beautiful building they had, and which, he said, it was the purpose of the Monmouthshire Education Authority. to try and equal or exoel. The pupils who had not obtained prizes were not so much before the public eye as the winners, and perhaps some of them would be engaged in more obscure duties in life than their companions, but the bulk of the girls in such a school ought to be told that their home duties were, eyen moro important than the work of teachers or doctors. Whether from the point of view of service to the community or of giving of their best, those who had the home life as their sphere ought to be encour- aged and praised to the utmost. When they considered the work of the mothers at home, and the work of teachers, there was no com- pa.rison between them in regard to its respon- sible-nesSc /.The teacher's responsibility was limited; but for the mother in the home there was no end to her duties, and he felt they ought to prepare more for the home life which was not considered enough in secondary schools. There was a. great opportunity for the development of the educational system in that direction—the preparing of girls for the immensely responsible and tremendously inter- esting work of the home. He would remind those, too, who had four years in such a school as tbat,. that education never ends; but as they had been provided there with splendid intellec- tual tools, it was their duty to keep their tools sharp. They should not give up their reading, but attend evening classes if possible. In the county of Monmouth there were technical classes with studentships for girls as well as for young men, but- there was only one example of a girl taking such a studentship. He was glad to hear that there was a branch of the Empire League in the school, and he hoped that the members would find it possible to do some- thing similar to a branch in Monmouthshire which had made a collection among its mem- bers towards Capt. Scott's Polar Expedition (applause). Mr C. E. Forestier-Walker, in proposing a vote of thanks to Lady Aberdare for so kindly distributing the prizes, and to Lord Aberdare for his interesting address, said that Wales owed a great debt of gratitude to the Aberdare family in connection with education. In con- nection with that school, Miss James and her charming colleagues deserved the highest praise, and were to be congratulated heartily in producing girls who had obtained the highest marks in Glamorganshire He sympathised with those who had not obtained prizes, for lie never" did so when at schoiol—(laughter)—but on looking back, he did not find himself in a worse position than those who had; and he thought they would be just as capable of .fight- ing- the battle of life as their companions. Their motto should be "to do all the good they can,- to all the people they can, on every day they can, and as long as they can" (applause). Mr. D. Prozger, J.P., having seconded this, the vote was carried with acclamation, and Lord Aberdare suitably acknowledged the compli- ment.. WHEN THE SHIP WAS SINKING. Aid. Wm. Williams then referred apprecia- tivelyto the interest taken in the schools by the worthy Chairman, and proposed a vote cf thanks to him. Mr. W. Coslett Beddoe, in seconding this, said everyone knew what a great friend of edu- cation Mr. J D. Thomas was, and that he had worked strenuously for the school. Both Mr. Thomas and himself had worked hard and he believed were the two, ,oldest governors. They had seen a large number of changes in the chairmanship during their little time. In 1907 they had a very able and distinguished chair- man in the person of the Rev. T. J. Jones, the Rector of Gellygaer. Why was he not there that day? They would have liked him in the chair, and if he had stood to his guns he pos- sibly would have been; but for some reason or other he withdrew. They saw the state of the schools that day, but if they had asked about their position two or three years ago they would have found them in a very different position. The ship was sinking. The chairman of the Governors could see the ship was sinking. They had a big overdraft at the bank. Many questions were asked how is this, and how is that (laughter). The reason was that pupils were increasing in numbers and the staffing had to be increased in both schools, and so the finances were getting low, and the boat was sinking. The banks were closing their doors against them, and they had either to sink or find a: remiedy, and so he moved that as one bank had closed its doors, that a bank at Cardiff be approached; and, with the Clerk, he arranged with that bank to take over the overdraft. They came to the rescue, and "it was A jolly good thing they did," for through it they managed to keep the boat floating, and by their suggestions a.nd the raising of the school fees to J64, their difficulties were got over. The Governors then went on very smoothly for a. considerable time, and spent large sums of money on the new buildings-a. substantial hostel and gymnasium The Chair- man corrected him the other day at Pengam, and said the County Council built them; but the fact was that the County Council advanced the money up to £ 7,000, and the Governors had to pay that amount back by instalment's with interest, so that they (the Governors) are really paying for the building out of their funds, which to-day, he was glad to say, were in a good state. So they would see why the old chairman. resigned. He thought that the Governors had to pay the whole amount ad- vanced to them by the county, but no doubt if he had understood the position clearly, he would, not have resigned his position as chairman at that time. The vote of thanks having been carried, the company adjourned to the dining hall for tea. In the evening a really excellent performance was given by some of the girls of the school of "The Rivals." The performance was of excep- tional merit, and a repetition of it was given on Wednesday evening.