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HER VENGEANCE

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CURED AT 78 of Chronic Cough…

FOR THE YOUNG FOLKS, !

-___----------.-_._---__---FOR…

FAMOUS HUMORIST'S DICTUM.

[No title]

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MAWRTH (MARS).

SALM YMWARED.

CWYN AWEN UWCH BEDD "HATHREN."

PENNILLION |

O', Deafness Cured. ! ----,i

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POET'S CORNER.

HER VENGEANCE

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"It is my only chance, too," she murmured under her breath "they saw me, and if they find me here and you gone, they will know I warned you. And they will have no mercy on a white woman who has helped negroes to es- cape." "Ah, this is worse still," he muttered, trem- bling violently, and yet understanding as in a flaili the position in which she had placed her- self in order to help them. "There is not a minute to lose, he said, giving him her hand again. "But your grandfather," he still argued; "he will save you at least?" "He would not have the power," she answer- ed "these are lynchers, and lynchers ere not men, but wild beasts. They cannot be reas- oned with—they destroy; that is all." "Can we get horses?" he asked "No," she answered, "they are all. in the pature, and that is in full sight of the lynchers. Oh, everything has been thought of, down even to preventing their being horses for your es- cape." "It has been well arranged," he said; "1 think there is no hope." "Nor I," she answered. After that, they said nothing, but went, with such speed as they could, towards the south- west, the opposite direction to that whence the lynchers were coming. They soon overtook Mr. Hetherington, who had hurried on, and Eira directed them, so that they took a path screen- ed by a bluff which was bigger than most, and contained a row of tall poplars that for a long time would hide them from the farm. Then, when they were within eyeshot of the farm again, she showed them a ravine, whose course they followed. It was not very deep, but it was enough to save them from being seen. Far behind them they heard a sound of shout- ing and the screaming of women and children. "They are searching the negroes' shanties," said Eira; "I don't suppose they will hurt anyone, but the people are frightened," They hurried on 2.t the best of their speed, Mr. Hetherington always a. little ahead of Eira and Hugh, who followed hand in hand. Behind them a colmun of thin smoke rose to the cloudless blue of the sky. "They are firing the hay," said Eira, "and perhaps grandfather'? house as well." The ravine they were following turned abruptly at right angles; end they, going straigkt on. had to trust themselves to the open prairie. j "The pursuit will have begun in earnest now," said Eira, and, pointing ahead, she add- ed "You see that hill where the bush begins? If we can reach there we may be able to hide among the tuees, if they have no dogs with them. Perhaps we hall be able to reach the railroad track beyond. If we do reach the rail- road, we may perhaps stop a train by showing a danger signal Then we shall be safe, for j we ca.n ask ;0 he given in charge of the police at Bismark Pant" "They wiii u- fhrst." said Hugh. "Yes, I tliirsir so she agreed. "What will tasr do to us if they asked Mr. ■Hether.in.<r>>:>. • [ "Oh, they rot hurt us," said Eira, but she looked over her. shoulder at whero the smoke hung hsavT over Siddle's farm. j "When we io the bush." said Hugh, think you mnsfc .?« us. You will be safer alone; and I »:ctay a little behind, and if they catch mo up < mav give them a littls to think about fo; t., tiraí! "Can you Scht a thousand?" she asked. "It j would be folly to try." but she liked bim the j better for his hcacl thrown back and his o-ear flashing eye. "Oar only hope is speed." the said. On the open prairie there was no deienon j from the beams of the sun. They toiled and i panted on, every step an effort, with labouring j breath and strainirur muscles, but yet urged by such a fear M would not allow them a se- cond's pause.. Behind them that thin column of smoke they had seen first had now grown } into a cloud thick and dark and heavy, like a black canopy of threat between the land and the blue depth of the sky. Of the lynchers shemsolves the^e was as yet no sign, but in front the hill and the trees to- j wards which they toiled seerhod as far distant as ever—seemed even to reoede. j The cruellest thin of rill was the barreness of the prairie that afforded these poor fugitives j no shelter or conoealmcnt anywhere. They J felt themselves conspicuous upon it, and knew | that miles away they could be seen with' per- i fect clearness: When at last, an hour later, { they came to another ravine, they blessed it as j they entered it. But this ravine, too, came to an end. and there lay yet another stretch of bare prairie be- tween them and the bush, that was compara- tively near now. "We must rush it," said Eira. "Can we run again ?" "I can't," panted Mr. Hetherington, and then pointing at Eira, as if her presence h"d just struck him: "Why is she with us?" he asked. "She brought us warning," said Hugh, rather angrily, "if we escape we shall owe her our lives. She would have been quite safe if she j had not tried to help us." "More fool she." grumbled Mr. Hethering- j ton. "I'm going to run." j He set off at a run accordingly—a clumsy, awkward run, with lurches sidewavs at times, as though he could hardly keep lib balance, j He never once looked, back at Hugh and Eira, j who followed after him at their beet speed. I It was like a nightmare, this wild rush over the prairie towards the bush that promised I them at some chance of safety and con- ) cealment." The sun was now iaoving towards its setting, but its slanting rlys still struck fiercely; the distance seemed; interminable nothing moved or stirred save themselves; their haste seemed an insult to the silence and soli- tude of the untroubled prairie, and even to stir up against them on its part a malignity it showed by making them plain from afar to their enemie=. Mr. Hetherington reached the bush a quarter of a mile before t.hem. and vanished within it. At last Hugh and Eira reached it also, and paused panting beneath the shade of a clump of poplars, the furthest flung outpost of the wood. I "At last," Hugh said. Eira turned and looked behind them. There. I just emerging from the head of the ravine they had themselves followed, was a light buggy driven by one man. I "Has he seen us?" Eira asked. "God know- said Hugh. Eira looked again, and then slid softly to the ground. J "I can do no more," she said, "they must find me here." Hugh looked down at her. It was plain she was far too eshausted to be able to carry out the plan he had formed, of her making her es- cape alone, while he stayed to draw the pur- suers on his own scent. He looked again over I the prairie. A man on horseback had now followed the buggy from the ravine, and both were coming towards the bush There issued from the ravine another man on horseback, and then another, and all took the same way. Huorh stooped and picked the half unconsci- ous Eira up. and then he kissed her, and hold- ing her in his arms he plunged into the depths of the bush. (To be continued.)