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HER VENGEANCE

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CURED AT 78 of Chronic Cough…

FOR THE YOUNG FOLKS, !

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FOR MATRON AND MAID. OF DIFFERENT GENERATIONS. "Mother and I are perfectly congenial," says a girl, "in almost everything except our ideas of how a house should be run. Of course, I am away all day at work, and it is right that she should have the management. But she is old-fashion-ed in her way?, and tries to run things as she did when my father was alive and we kept a house CD a large scale. We live now in a small flat, but she will havo baking da.ys and company dinners, as she al- ways did, and nearly works herself to death and nearly empties the family purse. "Then she wants me to save on dress. Of courss, it is the differenoe in our point of view. "When I attempt to bring more modern ideas into our way of living, she thinks I am partaking of the restlessness of the age. She r does not care for going out, so I stay at home. Mother's preferences are likely to rule me, and instead of developing jilong my own lines, I am in danger of stagnating afong hers. DAINTY CUSHION COVERS. No excuse can ever be made for the soiled cushions that often grace couches — disgrace might be more appropriate. Never have ex- quisito cretonnes a.nd chintzes been so inexpen- sive as now. Such materials clean and wash with the best results, and cushion covers of them always look attractive. Cases can be quickly run up on a machine; one point to remember is to make the cover a trifle smaller than the cushion, so as to get a good fit. BRASS ORNAMENTED WOOD. So fascinating are the manual arts other tnan needlework, which may be pursued by the amateur, that efforts are being continually made to find some new field in which attractive articles for the house or personal use can be turned out. Among the latest innovations of this sort is the new way of using metal on wood. Hammered brass has been popular a long time as handicraft for women, but this new idea uses the metal to decorate articles of wood instead of having the articles made entirely of metal. NIP "WHINING" IN THE BUD. j If your child is a whiner, break him of the habit. There is nothing so detestable as the young- ster who whines from dawn to daijs. His in- cessant "Why can't I do tn_i",?" "Must I do that?" "I don't want to 1" or "I don't see why," is maddening to a degree. Even the doting parent who is responsible for that whining has periods when she is in- clin-ed to wonder why she was so proud whn her boy or her girl was born, when she con- rkiers her childless friend not to off after all. Cure him of th* habit._ and if the whiner himself does not thank you in after years, be sure that those who must live with him will do so. There is no chance of happiness under the roof of a whiner; nothing you do will please, and everything you do or leave undone is war- ranted to displease. Such being the caM, break up whining before it has become a habit. SPOKES IN THE WHEEL OF FASHION. Some new hats have embroidered velvet crowns. Other crowns are a mass of tulie Jabots worn with coat costumes grow longer and longer. Cactus red is one of the most striking new colours. Many of the new leghorn hats are faced with vel vet. Linens for the coming season are soft, heavy, and pliable. Besides ribbons of gold and silver, very at- tractive ones in copper bind up hair. Many of the new short coats are made to fit loosely and hang in straight lines. Elaborate handwork embroidery is to be seen on coats and gowns of washable material. Square and oblong buckles of gathered silk a an established trimming for smart gowns. Various springtime greens are wall to the front again. White swiss muslin for blouses and dresses show fine coloured dots. The newest form of the long chiffon scarf shows one fine chiffon posed over another of different colouring. Ashes of roses, coral, and what is known as bois de rose are three of the favourite pink shades this season. A wide ribbon bow or a fancy buckle is the usual finish to dancing slippers of satin. The puff on a sleeve may be in almost any position to be smart, but a favourite placing is when the sleeve presents the puff at the back, it comin-g out full over tho elbow, and drooping slightly over a deep cuff. FICHUS AND SLEEVES. When it comes to artitic owning, the clever home dressmaker can often hit upon effects that are charming and wonderfull becoming to her. With many women, the fichu and fichu draperies are always delightful, and invariably can someone adapt their favourite sty,h to the fashion of the moment. Just now the small sleeves aid the- would-be fichu wearer for the slight arm coverings and shoulder drapery can b all in one. A charming gown that lias been made up over paile green satin that had figured as an important gown and seen very hard wear, shows a fVhu of a peculiar dul! heliotrope tone in net. This net veils the who!? dress. and is held in position to the waist with phs. trons of embroidery showing green and heE" trope silk and beads among other colourings. From either side of the flat embroidered piece at the back emanates the fulness of the. fich i. which is drawn up over the shoulder and round the arm, fastening down on to the front with rosettes and two dangling ends. A PRETTY MODEL. A leading dressmaker who makes a speciality of children's things had a great number o* modol costumes and dresses in amethyst and mauve shades of frieze and cloth. One which particularlv took my fancy was in Parma mauve cloth, and suited to a girl of ten O a little more. The skirt was of the simple pleated type, but pressed and stitched perfectly, and the little coat, loose-fitting and double-breasted, had a square collar falling over the shoulders of mauve and white washing silk in the tiniest of checks, and cuffs to match. • A little blouse of the same, simply tucked from neck to waist with box-pleat, and killted frills at each side, was provided to wear underneath, completed with a dainty little turnover collar of em- broidered white muslin.—Leaoh s Children's Dressmaker" for April. HINTS FOR THE HOME. Toast can be made over a gas stove without soorching or blackening by putting a thin piece of sheet iron or tin over the burner When it is hot hoJd the bread over it on s bread toaster. Potatoes when boiled, if not a good colour, can be made beautifully white by adding a little milk and a small piece of butter, not forgetting to wash wall in the opef air. Tried and always suooessful. To be rid of mice.—The simplest and most effective way is to get some mint (fresh or dried), and put in the mice holes or about the place. The mioe obj-act to the smell, and, find other haunts. The mint wants renewing once a week, as the smell has all gone after a week. This has been tried and proved effective. Fruit Jelly.—Get a pint jelly (pineapple, apri- cot, or any other preferred), have ready tin of apricot or pineapple. Make jelly, using instead of the usual pint of water the juice from tinned fruit, and make up to the pint. When dissolv- ed, pour over the pint already laid at bottom of dish. A very nice jelly is made by using different kinds of fruit in same way, such as oranges, bananas, pineapple, cherry, straw- berries, or anything in season. CAKES AND PUDDINGS.—No. 19. The recipe below gives a very nioo plain Cake which will not harm the most delicate coneti- tiufeion, yet which will be very appetising. RICE CAKE. 1 paoket of Cakeoma. 5 ozs. Butter. 2 Eggs. Half a glass of Milk. Half a teacupful of Ground Rioe. METHOD. Empty the Cakeoma and ground rice into a mixing bowl and rub in the butter until quite fine. Beat the eggs, and together with the Milk add them to the other ingredients, and mix thoroughly but lightly, and bake in a moderately hot oven. A Bunlo&f recipe next week. Cakeoma is sold only in 3d. packets by Grocers and Stores everywhere.

FAMOUS HUMORIST'S DICTUM.

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MAWRTH (MARS).

SALM YMWARED.

CWYN AWEN UWCH BEDD "HATHREN."

PENNILLION |

O', Deafness Cured. ! ----,i

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POET'S CORNER.

HER VENGEANCE