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Y GOLOFN QYMREI6. ¡....._,-............_....

EVENTS OF THE WEEK.

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EVENTS OF THE WEEK. The Fr&ich General Election will take place on Sunday, April 24th. Mr. J. M. Simmonds, of Round Hill-cres- cent, Brighton, has attained the age of 102, Wales has 3,240 men in the Army; Eng- land, 183,703; Scotland, 18,530; and Ireland, 22,956. It is understood that the Elder-Dempeter Line is to be floated with a capital of 22,000,000. The Graigols fuel workers, Swansea, who had come out on strike, decided on Saturday to return to work. Forty-five persons have been killed and thirty-one injured in a railway disaster near Greenmountain (Iowa). A Blue Book issued on Monday shows that the British Government has decided on the evacuation of the interior of Somali- land. In collision with the I* and N„Wv Railway passenger steamer <?oane £ iara, the Ma,rq^i« of of yrab eaftfc Her, cww- wei-e rescued.. I At Swansea on Monday John Foley, "a labourer, was fined B10 and costa for selling intoxicants without a licence on Sunday, March 13th. Mr. Haldana suggests a Second Chamber very small in numbers and representative of very great constituencies, so as to obtain the pick of the nation. Three thousand persons met in Trafalgar- square on Saturday to protest against the re- moval of the "Brown Dog" statute from its position it Battersea. A Japanese mantelpiece in the Eltham Golf Club, which the King greatly admired during a recent visit, has been presented1 to His Majesty by the club. Welsh tinplaters, members of the Dockers' Union, are arranging to forward £ 100 to American tinplaters—many of whom axe IVelahmen-iiow on strike. Two of the Earl of Rosebery's "reform" resolutions were passed in the House of Lords on Monday, and while the third was being discussed, the debate collapsed at an early hour, and was adjourned. Trade at Swansea Docks list week was very brisk,1 all the tips and cranes being actively employed, and one of the most pleasing features in the fact that the new King's Dock is being utilised more fully than before. By. learning and reciting the whole of the New Testament during the past year little Jane Davies, not quite 12 j^ears old, of Blaen- cwm, Gartheli, Cardiganshire, has just won a prize from the local Church Sunday School. South London musicians have, with the per- mission of tha L.C.C., erected a sundial in Bus- kin Park. as a memorial to Mendelssohn. The diaJ stands on the site of the house in which the great composer lived while he was engaged in writing his "Spring Song." In the House of Commons on Nlonday ATr. Asquith explained the Government's intentions in regard to the Budget. A discussion arose on the financial confusion, and Mr. Lloyd George in fixing the responsibility, delivered sn animated reply to the Opposition speakers, The indications in the political world point to another General Election in the near future. There was considerable activity in prepara- tion for the campaign in the offices of the Chief Government Whip on Saturday, and it was announced that all Conservative seats will be contested. centenary of the Swansea auxiliary of the British and Foreign Bible Society will shortly be celebrated. Swansea holds the unique position of being the first auxiliary formed in the Principality, and the twelfth in the world. The local auxiliary was formed at the Swansea Guildhall on April 27th, 1810. The Labour party on Monday issued cir- culam to about 200 Members of Parliament asking their co-operation in bringing for- ward a resolution after Easter on the deci- sion of the House of Lords on the Osborne case, which prevented trade union funds being used for paying salaries to M.P.'s. Croydon's electricity undertaking already having a reaerve of over £ 34,000, the borough council were able on Monday night to appro- priate a surplus of £ 4.000, and thu3 avoid an inorease in the general district rate. The ] poor rate, however, has increased; by 2d., chiefly owing to the demands for educational purposes. Mr. Churchill, the Home Secretary, spoke on the Veto question on Saturday at Man- chester, and said that after the Resolutions had passed the Commons, either these or A Bill baaed upon them would be introduced in the House of Lords without delay. He ex- pressed the opinion that it is on the Veto, not on the Budget* that the fate of this Parliament depends. A L.C.C. sdhoot teaeheT, named Herbert Winslow, of Tufnoll-park-road, has been found dead in his bedroom, with ft rubber tube fastened to his neck by a piece of rope. One end of the tube waa attached to a gas bracket and the other end was in his mouth. Winsliw's brother expressed the opinion at the inquest that the man's mind had suddenly the inquest that the man's mind had suddenly given way as the result of over-etudy. i When an express from Derby to Man- ohftter, Vag approaching Chinley on Sunday ¡ evening, one of the passengers, Steve Prophit, agedi 23, the eon ofaa. widow living a Romford- street, Chdrlton-on-Medlock, was found dying, in the corridor. "I've taken poison. I ehali soon be dead," he said to the conductor, and then expired. To his mother he had written a letter in which he said he could not stand I the trouble any longer. I. I About two and a-half years ago, when a I Mr. Owen was a relief stationmaster at Aber- I gwynfi Station, on the G.W.R., someone broke j into the station and stole articles to the value of 50s. The articles were of no use to anyone I in the employ of the company. Mr. Owen, who I paid for the value of the articles, has now re- ceived an anonymous letter containing JE2 17s. 6d., being interest on the money, and ex- plaining that the theft was fof the purpose of annoying another man. Sixty pounds was realised at Sotheby's on I Monday for the Book of Common Prayer, 1634, bound in old English blue, with the crowned arms of William IL, Prince of Orange, and Mary, daughter of Gharlesl., and Princess Royal of England. The Prayer. Orange, and Mary, daughter of Charles I., whose signature, "Carolus R. it bears on I the title page to the Psalms, and may have been given by him to his son-in-law and daughter for use in the private chapel during their stay in England. Mr. Frank A. Gill, a Ciirector of the Lanca- shire Inebriates' Board, pleads in the annual rfeport of that body for the segregation of in- carable drunkards. He also states that while the wholesome check on the too rapid increase of the law-breaking classes formerly imposed by deportation had been withdrawn, we found everywhere, instead, humanitarianism run riot, and allowed degenerates to live in our midst, contaminating the race. We compelled them to live more or less healthy lives, and so en- abled them to propagate their species, which we then reared at the cost of the community. A twelve yeafa* search for a man's missing mother has just had a strange1 ending at Nottingham. Fourteen years ago the son of Emma Depman. a widow, wm adopted by foster parents, but after two years he began searching for his mother. On Monday he saw in the newspapers an account of an inquest on & Mrs. Desman, of Nottingham, who, at. ter being missed for ten days, was found dead in a bath full of water by a friend, who broke into the house. Death bad taken place, ac- cording to the medical evidence, from shock. Struck with the similarity of the names, the eon asked the permission of the police to see the bpdy, and then identified his long-lost mother. The fourth annual report of the National Women's Social and Political Union states that the total sum raised during the year was £ 31,686. The salaried staff now number 98. Twonty,thoumad meetings have been held dur. ing the year. The organisation throughout the country is grouped round 23 centres, to whioh organisers have been appointed by the execu- tive. The campaigq in London is worked from headquarters end from 20 local Women's Social and Political Unions. Two hundred and ninety- four women have suffered imprisonment, bring- ing the total served since the beginning of the agitation to 28 years. On 110 occasions the hunger-strike has been carried out, and 36 times forcible feeding has been inflicted. The first sod of a new coal mine in connec- tion with the South Rhondda Colliery at Bryniau, Llanharran, was cut last Thursday by Mrs. James Hood, of Edinburgh* in the pre- sence of an influential gathering, including Mr. W. W. Hood, the promoter of the concern, and other gentlemen connected with colliery enter- prise. The new pit marks the «crmiBencetnen6t of a new industrial era for the district, and ia conjunction with the great developments in the Ely Valley, the whole district » regarded as likely at no distant date to become a rival to the Rhondda in its output of first-class coal. The new pit, when sunk, will find employment for 1,000 men. Mw. Hood was presented wiw a silver spade, with which she cat the fcrst sod. The nave pit will be known as the Yirfet Pit.

GOLF.

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