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POET'S CORNER.

EXILED.

HER VENGEANCE

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FUN AND FANCY.

FOR THE YOUNG FOLKS. ^

SKIN-TORTURED FAMILY.

FOR MATRON AND MAID.I

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FOR MATRON AND MAID. I READY TO RESPOND. 1 There is always a welcome place for a good listener. If you are in this class, there are a few things to keep in mind. First you must force yourself to pay strict attention to the talk- ers. Pin your faith to the conversation, do no' let your wits go wandering into the why aI" wherefore of the talkers' dross or business. Be ready to answer any query that might be made. for, of course, a. good talker will try to engage his listeners in an exchange of ideas. Then bo ready to rescue the topic from an in- glorious death due to the interrupting person. "You were saying that you preferred," etc., is often a very little thing to bring out a story that might otherwise never be heard. Every- one can do that much. A casual relevant re- mark is within anyone's power, and the good listener with this ability is just as necessary to a social gatherings as a good talker. WHIRLWIND GIRLS. There are some girls who seem. to breathe ex- clamation points. Everything they door cay or think is explosive. Suavity is" as much beyond t.1iem as to keep a. freshly shampooed head neat in a windstorm. Abruptness is a fault of youth. It seems to come natural to bang doors, make curt answers, enter a room with a dash and leave it unceremo- niously. Much of this abruptness will be toned down with years. As girls grow older they learn to move gracefully and quietly, to cut out much of their "slap-banging," to make at least a pre- tence of interest in what others say. Those lessons would be acquired more quickly if girls realised how much their abruptness worked against their receiving invitations. ALL NEED ENCOURAGEMENT. Love of commendation is one of woman's chief charms. There is not a woman alive who is indifferent to words of praise from those she loves. The women who stifle their hearts' cries be- cause it is vain to listen for an answer where they have a right to expect to look for it, and go on performing their duties just the same, are the women who most long for the kindly, appreciative word. In too many homes it is the lack of appre- ciation that builds up sickening barriers between hearts that should be near. Is the love of ap- preciation by friends a crime, a weakness? If so, then men as well as women are under its sway, for men cannot get along at all-the ma- jority of them—without this sort of bolstering up. AN UNLOVELY TRAIT. There are eome traits so utterly unlovely in- every respect that it is difficult to think of them in connoction with womanhood. One of theoo-thc most hideous, perhaps, of any—is greed, and tho dreadful thing about it is that it is apt to be an entirely unconscious afflic- tion. Greed seems sometimes to be instinctive with the woman who has not early in life been cured of one of this repulsive characteristic, more animal than human; never satisfied, repaying kindness and generosity with an absolute lack of appreciation, and but one distinct idea that there is an opportunity for gain, small or large, and that it must be made the most of at all hazards. THE OTHER SIDE. There is nothing more torturing than for a man with a strong sense of order to be tied for life to a woman who can keep neither herself nor her house looking neat. It is a pathetic sight to see a husband trying to pick. up debris from an untidy room. or attempting to wield a much-needed duster." Usually friction, not pathos, is the result of such an ill-assorted couple. The neat one storms and the sloven weeps or answers back, yet refuses to be reformed on orderly lines. JOYS WITHIN REACH. All over the world there are so many joys that unpleasant things can be overlooked, and all the pleasures appreciated. A woman .who can be a friend and yet not expect a man to cater to her vanities is a joy. A man who knows how to be a perfect com- rade and yet. not make love to every woman he meetsisajoy. A thoroughly good. story is a joy. A great big bunch of flowers, pretty of hue and sweet of perfume, is a joy. A dainty dinner with someone you like very much is a joy. A becoming hat that sets comfortably on your head is a joy. To see a dear baby, an affectionate dog, or a chirpy bird is a joy. i FASHION FANCIES. Sleeveless coats of braided net dip down well over the hips. Bands of velvet border those of the flimsiest materials. The flowers wreathed on hats entirely hide the crowns, be they tall or not. Big scarves of velvet, tied in big flat bows are for trimming broad-brimmed ahapes. The beehive hat in slightly varied forms has taken on a new lease of life. Long mousquetaire gloves are neoessary with the three-quarter sleeves. Belts of dull gold' or silver are most effective on simple gowns. t Coloured lining to fine white summery fabrics are to be a feature of the coming season. The sailor tie, if not the sailor collar, is no- ticeable on 6mart costumes. Generally the collar is only a few inches wide and even all the way round. Old blue in straw is seen facing bilf black velvet hats. Dead autumn colours mingle with the delicate bright shades of spring. Replacing bands of fur at the foot of skirts are wide bands of heavy lace. Overdraperies are caught up at either side with a rosette of the trimming material. Light gowns showing rather high waists take waistbands of narrow velvet ribbon with long streamers depending from beneath a buckle at the left. Some tailor-made costumes have the back panel of the skirts drawn in at the ankles be- neath bands of the material. Collarless coats for the spring are cut open at least halfway to the waist. Some of these new specimens can boast of no fastenings, yet a considerable number 01 ornamental buttons and loops. AIR AND FOOD. Plain looks are not terrifying. It is the fear that they cannot be overcome that allows Fa- ther Time to scratch tell-tale marks over the countenance. The plain face, if it be good-natured looking. has a certain element that defies wrinkles and often passes for good looks. Every woman's face is a mirror that reflects her life. Good living, not high living, but ra- tional living, invariably brings good looks. Many women with tired and puffy places un- der their eyes, with drawn and weary looks at the corners of their mouth which cannot be hidden with all the elegance of dress, could ap- pear young and blooming if they knew how to breathe properly. The foundation of all vitality depends upon proper breathing and food. HINTS FOR THE HOME. To dean a Brass Tray which has Become Rusty.—You will find that vinegar and brick- dust mixed will restore the appearance of the tray. When Using a Gas Stove, never leave any- thing on it that might boil over. Any fluid boiling over may extinguish the flame and leavo the gas escaping. When someone strikes a match to light the stove an explosion is likely to occur Marble Cleaner.—Take equal quantities of soap, soda and whiting, and boil in water till the soap melts; spread over marble and let it stand' a few hours. Then wash off with clean warm water, and you will find the surface re- newed and all stains will have disappeared. Economy in Cooking.—Put all scraps of beef and mutton tat and dripping into a basin, with a cupful of water. Place in a mild oven for an hour or two. Then set in a cool place. Use this instead of the given quantities of butter in recipes. Pork and bacon fat and dripping should be done together. Being much richer than the other, only half the quantity is nec- essary. This is excellent for the pastry of savories, such as sausage rolls, meat patties, etc. Two Wallpaper Hints.—When papering a damp wall take A lb. of alum and lb. of glue size, dissolve both together in a pail of boil- ing water. Take off the old paper and waah the wall once or twice with the solution; when dry it can be papered. For those who may have varnished paper, here is a splendid way of washing it. First take a bucket half-full of warm water, add to this two tablespoonfuls of ammonia. Wash over the paper with this, us- ing a nearly dry flannel. Go over again with a clean, soft, dry duster, and a beautiful polish will result. CAKES AND PUDDINGS.-No. 18. This pudding is very nice for a special occa- sion, and will b enjoyed if served with Sweet Sauce, a good recipe for which was given in the issue of a fortnight ago. CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 1 packet of Cakeoma. 6 ozs. fine chopped Suet A pinch of Salt 1 to 2 ozs. Cocoa. 2 Eggs. A third to half a glass of Milk. METHOD. Put the dry ingredients and tha suet into a bowl and.'mix; then add the egirs (well beaten) and the niiik, and thorouglUy but lightly mix altogether. Steam or boil for three hours and servo hot with Sweet Sauce. Next week a Rics CL rccipe. Cakeoma is sold only in 3d. packets by i ftrocgr| øi- Sifttej eTeryjrhsrft,

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HER VENGEANCE