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.I LOCAL INTELLIGENCE

SHARPS AND FLATS.I

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DOWLASS,

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Wimborne Club, Dowlais.l

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Wimborne Club, Dowlais. l ENJOYABLE CONCERT. A PLEA FOR HIGHER IDEALS. On Tuesday evening, at the Wimborne Club, a well-attended smoking concert was held, the Rector of Dowlais, who is chairman of the management committee, presiding. The smoker was not confined to members, and to show their kindness to the general public, all were invited. It was a capital concert. The Rector opened with an address in a very fine vein, and called upon Mr. W. J. Morgan (bass) to sing" The Yeoman's Wedding," which was encored vociferously, and he sang The Miller of Win chelsea." Mr. Tom Phillips (tenor) sang Margarita," this again being encored, and ho gave that touching old Welsh air to the words by Ceiriog, Dafydd y gareg wen." Miss' Annie Iiees, the Dowlais favourite, then sang "Jl Ba"io" to English words, doing the trills splendidly of course she was encored, and she sang "Love is meant to make us glad," after which there was a break in the singing. Mr. Richard G. Price, headmaster Central Schools, was called upon to give < address. He expressed his pleasure at being present, and con- gratulated the members on the flourishing condition of the Club, as shown in the annual report. He was a firm believer in institutions of that kind still, he would modestly remind them that the real lasting good which should accrue could not be estimated in a balance sheet, nor tabulated in any return. The real, tangible value of the institution was determined by the number and character of the aspirations and ideals of the members.. As a means-of relaxa- tion and mental diversion it had its rightful place, but if it were used simply and solely for that purpose; if it kept them crawling and prevented them from taking wings and flying to higher realms, it had to bo guarded against. The young man who was satisfied with his lot, and who had a cursed feeling of contentment, was readf for his burial robes (cheers). "There was a crying need for higher ideals to stimulate them on the paths of progress. They required at the present day a wise combination of the ideals of the past, and a symmetrical develop- ment of character. John Ruskin, after studying the greatest paintings of the world, and admiring the noblest examples of the world's architec- ture, found after all that man was the greatest study of all, and the service of man was the most holy service of all (cheers). Mr. Price then earnestly appealed to the members of the club to be animated with the loftiest of ideals and determined to keep them constantly in view in shaping the policy of the institution. They should aim at making the club a great centre of light, a mighty factor for doing good, keeping always before them as the noble aspira- tion, and a lofty ideal the ennobling purifying, and beautifying of the live of those around them If this were done the club would be fulfilling its highest and most exalted function (cheers). Mr. W. J. Morgan then gave a song, Tliora," in a very pleasing manner. its highest and most exalted function (cheers). Mr. W. J. Morgan then ga\c a song, Thora," in a. very pleasing manner. DREAMING AND DOING. I Councillor Isaac Edwards was next called upon for an address. lie referred to the plea- sure it gave him to be present, and to the prominent part some of h:6 former colleagues in the mills department of the Dowlais Office were taking in the evening's programme. He referred to the absence of the Mayor and Aid. Enoch Morrell, and regretted, on behalf, of the gathering, that they were absent Mr. Prioa l had referred to his intention of coming to live in Dowlais, and his desire to serve the town by so doing. As a Dowlais boy born and bred, he (Coun. Edwards) desired to give the hearti- est welcome possible to everyone who, not uav- ing had the inestimable advantage of being born in town, had done the next best thing, viz., chosen it for their abiding place. And it was as a native of Dowlais that he wished to speak in terms of heartiest appreciation of the work done by the committee of the Wimborne Institute and its members in this practical way of considering the physical and social needs of the young people who lived in the town. "While others had been dreaming, they had been doing. There were in many places people who were only too ready to decry the place of their birth, or possibly of their adoption, and Dow- lais had baen very unfortunate in that respect. There were a number of people who never took an opportunity of saying a good Word for the town, but who took every opportunity of decry- ing it, and that, as a rule, in outside places where there was no possibility of contradiction. He, for one, was proud of Dowlais, which occu- pied the position it did to-day through the de- voted efforts of those heroes of a past day who had served their generation nobly by preparing the way for the many solid advantages which this generation enojyed. Nowaday. everybody enjoyed the privilege of attending the Free Library in the town; but his friend, Mr. Cart- wright (whom he was tto glad to eee present), could tell many an interesting tale of the old guard who, fifty years ago, was connected with the Library movement before even the Dow- la.is Memorial was established. Then, educa- tionally, Dowlais had been in the van; but, un- fortunately, to-day it suffered for that very fact. When the Dowlais Schools were built, they were acknowledged to be the finest in the country, and thus for forty or fifty years school authori- ties all over the country had benefited by the experiments of Dowla-is, and, of course, had gone one further, with the result that it was only just at the present tilDO that Dowlais itself was moving, and having its d in the matter of proper school accommodation. Coun- cillor Edwards paid a well-deserved compliment to those who were responsible for the social work carried on in connection with the Insti- tute. He knew there had been a time when the Institute was looked down upon, but now everybody recognised that the young people should be given an opportunity of coming to- gether during their hours of relaxation in a manner that would benefit themselves without doing an injury to anybody else. He wished particularly to acknowledge the good work done by the Restaurant, and gave an illustra- tion of how in practical life the Wimborne In- stitute enabled many charitably-disposed per- sons to put their good wisfies into practical form by giving deserving assistance in kind to those wihe were in need. One word of criticism he would venture to give, and that was, that he would like to see the organization extended to embrace persons of both sexes; and in a humorous way he stated that although it might, as too result of such a course, tend to tempor- arily diminish the membership by inducing some of either sex to join hands and form home institutes of their own. Eventually, he ventur- ed to say, that fact itself would tend to a great increase in the membership in due time. In conclusion, Councillor Edwards earnestly ap- pealed to them to continue in their work of considering the physical and social needs of the town in which they lived, and yet not be content merely with what they had done. After a song by Mr. Tom Phillips, "0 na byddai'n haf o hyd," an encore was demanded, and Mr. Phillips gave "In Old Madrid," and Miss Annie Rees gave the last song of the evening, "Gwlad y Delyn," which fairly brought down the house. The claims of Miss Annie Rees on the town of Dowlais was press- ed on those present by the Rector, and he ask- ed that everything that each individual could do would be done to secure her the scholar- ship she so well deserves. A collection was then made toward purchasing "Western Mail" coupons, and it realised a good sum. Then came the votes of thanks to the artistes and Mr. J. Rhys Morgan, who- rendered efficient service, which was propoeed by Mr. John Edwards, G.W.R. Inspector, and seconded by Mr. E. Cartwright; a vote of thanks to the visitors (Mr. R. G. Price, and Mr. J. Edwards), proposed by Mr. F. Reed, of the Dowlais office, seconded by Mr. E. Ro- berts and to the Rector, by the two visi- tors already named. "Hen Wlad fy Nhadau" was then 6ung by Miss Rees, and the audience joined in the chorus. I

The Street Lighting of Dowlais.

Excursion to Dublin.

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