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PUBLISHED BY SPECIAL ABBAXGBMENT. The Road to Love BY MADAME ALBANESI, Author of "Capricious Caroline," "The Strongest of All Things," "Susannah and One Other," "Lov* and Louisa," "The Way to Win,' etc., etc. COPYRIGHT. CHAPTER XVII. When Miriam went upstairs to her room El- len went with her- She was, however, dismissed. "You had better go back; Evelyn may want you," she was told. So she went downstairs again, and for about an hour she and Varley and Lady Evelyn r-t talking most naturally and pleasantly. news from Lord Norchester's room was mdet gratifying He was sleeping peacefully, and liio mother was Jess anxious. Richard Varley frcJIy said "good-night" to the two girls, and th-,y went upstairs together. Lady Evelyn slipped her arm round Ellen's waist, and gave a l-ttle sigh as they progressed towards her room. I feel tired," she confessed. "It has been Such an exciting day. How I should have got through without you, Ellen, I don't know, dear! I hope you won't think I'm gushing too much," Lady Evelyn added the next mo- ment. "but really and truly I do care for you, Ellen; I've always wanted a sister, especially of late. It would have made such a difference in my life. You are just the kind of sister I should like to have had." She kissed Ellen as she spoke, and Ellen re- turned her kiss. "If you think I doubt your words," she said, "you are very much mistaken. I am sure that you are in earnest; sure, too, that we shall be friends. If it means so much to you how much more does it mean to me? For I lost everything when daddy died." They stood a while at the bend of the stair- ease, and they made plans for the next morn- ing. "Mother never leaves her room till quite late, and I suppose she will be with Harry all day. Could you get up quite early, and come for a walk. I want to show you all the places I like best in the grounds. Miriam will not want you quite early, will she ?' "I never know when Lady Norchester will want me," Ellen answered, ",ihe changes her arrangements every day; but if I can come I will." Lady Evelyn induced Ellen to stay a while Wth her in her sitting-room. "I hear that you have been occupying these rooms," she said. "I feel so mean turning you out and yet I am so glad to be back in them. I can almost pretend that I have never been away from Wynche. Don't hurry unless you are very tired. Look what a beautiful night it is! Let us sit here by the window and I watch the moon—shining through the trees. Aren't they beautiful trees? I don't believe there are such trees anywhere else in the world to beautiful as these dear old trees at Wynche." They ensoonced themselves in two chairs, and were as happy as possible, when suddenly the door was burst open, and Miriam appeared. She had taken off her white gown, her hair was rough, and she wore one of her old soiled robos. "I have come to see if you have everything you want," she said. Her voice was rough, her manner rough, too. Lady Evelyn got up very quickly. She was startled; something about Miriam made her nervous. "Oh, thank you," she said, "I have every- thing. It is very lovely here. How good of you to have kept my rooms untouched all this time. I was just telling Ellen when I am here it &ecms as if I had never been away. Miriam laughed. "And I suppose you have been thanking dear Ellen! Miss Milner, why are you not in your room? When you left me just now you told tne you would be going to bed directly." Ellen winced. "I am going to bed," she said, "I only came here because-" "LJmow perfectly well why you came here," said Miriam, "because you want to sit and talk about me and—and make fun of me! If any- body stays with Evelyn and talks to her I am the person to do that!" Ellen dared not look at Lady Evelyn. It was e moment of real suffering with her; but with ready tact she made as little as possible of the dlfiiculty; with a smile she held out her hand to Lady Evelyn. "I am afraid I have been keeping you up, t-nd you must be very tired. Please forgive rre. Good night. Good night, once more, Lady Norchester." She did not stretch out her hand to Miriam. but moved easily across to the door and passed out. As she went Miriam stood looking very fixedly •t Lady Evelyn. "I don't want no strangers coming between you and me," she said. "Now that you are

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--------FUN AND FANCY.

FOR THE YOUNG FOLKS.

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FOR MATRON AND MAID.

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PUBLISHED BY SPECIAL ABBAXGBMENT.