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fOETS CORNER.

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--------FUN AND FANCY.

FOR THE YOUNG FOLKS.

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FOR MATRON AND MAID.

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FOR MATRON AND MAID. START THE WEEK WELL. Keep ahead of your work, whether you are a home woman or a business woman. The one who makes a success of things works regularly, not spa<!llodiully. *and she never deludes her. soit by the beFef that she is justified in taking things easy to-day because after a good night's rest or a change in the weather she can work with double energy on the morrow. One busi ness woman who makes it a rule to keep ahead of her work, on being asksd to lunch on a Monday, shook her head "Make it any other day in the week and come with pleamre, but on Monday I stick hard ac it except for a short brisk waik and a quick lunch by mvself. If we go to lunch together, we are very likely I to dawdle, and I'm a bit superstitious about Monday If I do not accomplish a lot that day and start the week right, everything goes wronir the other five davF. If I have a Monday big in results, somehow the whole week is big." This is one worker's experience. Keep ahead of your work is evidently her motto. NOVELTIES OF FASHION. Pretty little waist-belts with bows and tassels at the back come with lacy gowns for mid- summer. Spotted net, glinting occasionally with jewels, is seen on dinner frocks. Huge hats are draped and hung with lace veils. Flounces of lace a.re found on some thin summer skirts. Three rows of roses encircling the crown of a. leghorn hat is the full trimming. Gold net like a wide-meshed wire netting crinkles around some hat forms lacked with wide ribbon. White chiffon hats of the beefeater style carry two rows of big jet beads. Coarse straw hats of creamy tint are trimmed with ribbons of blue and dead pink roees. Sleeves that are lace at the top, laco below the elbow, and showing rather a. full puff of soft material between are seen in Paris. Long plain linen or tussore silk coats some- times have bands of embroidery down cither side, back and front. Similar trimming also extends the length of the arm, and the single button for fastening is a fancy one. The coat slashed at the sides and laced to- gether with betasselled ribbon is still seen. Among effective and up-to-date combinations of colouring are a strong blue and a dead ame- thyst shade of purple. In new linens appear copper shades, cachou, tilloul. and French and powder grays. Dark tobacco and a delicate champagne serce are trying to rival the ever-attractive and fash- ionable dark blue. SHINE BEST AT HOME. Away from home people are generallv "on parade," the real character is always more or less concealed, and the influence of that char- acter more or (ess diverted by the effort to make one's better self prominent. In the home we are our true unaffected selves, and our real influence upon others has fullest play. And it is in the home that we are with tr10se who are. dearest to us, and upon whom we would like our influence alwavs to be for the best. Yet how often do we let our unworthiest selves crop out there, because at home we are loved and "understood," and know that faults will be overlooked and forgiven ? This is true enough, but that fact does not undo the harm that the influence of these fail- ures is sure to work. The home really deserves the best. THE CHILDREN'S CHUMS. The wise mother will allow her girls and boys to bring their young companions in at any time, no matter how it may "get on her nerves. She will always be prepared for the great truest at the family table, always have the bedroom ready for the "chum" to be made ,weloome if occasion suggests it. She will not consider the matter as trouble- some in the least. The girls and boys who arc less fortunate than her own will look up to her with love and reverence, will come to her with their small troubles, and she will receive her reward in the sweet, tender companionship of the youthful friends of her loved brood. TEACH YOUNG ONES TO HELP Children often are unjustly punished by their unconscious parents. Injustice in punishment is always a result of impatience due to physical fatigue or mental anxiety. Many trifling of- fences on the part of the children, which could be overlooked when the home conditions were favourable, become fuel for the ill-humour of grown-ups of the household. If the boy slams the door when mother or father is suffering from an aching head, the act may seem an affront, but he didn't mean it; it was just the noisy natural act of a regular boy, and the best way to rebuke him is to call him to your side and tell him of your pain and suffering, and ask him to keep the house quiet. He will go away proud and important with his responsibility and your confidence, instead of with a bruised and smarting sense of injustice I that will be the result of sharp words. THE LAUGHING CURE. Laugh and bo well is the new science. It teaches its followers what they have to do if they are afflicted with that baneful disease- nerves: that if they wish to regain health they must "Iau".h regularly every day, laugh until the tears run down the cheeks." When one is suffering from a severe attack of nerves, it is not the easiest thing in the world to laugh, yet the doctor who is pushing forward the laughing cure says that one can so school their risibilities to the point that they a.re able at command to break forth into peals of laughter. What the nerves require when they a.re run down, no matter from what cause, is good, wholesome laughter, and what the tired body and sluggish organisms need is the exercise you get when you laugh from the bottom of your heart. For a good, deep laugh you have to use vour lungs, and the sooner you acquire the habit of laughter, the sooner the battle over tho nerves is won. POEMS OF THE PROSAIC. Some time, perhaps, when poets are putting aside thouirhta of the Woman Decorative, they will sing some song of the Woman Prosaic. It is she who keeps the whole machinery of every- day life in running order. This field of sub- jects is new and as yet unworked, though tho matter is varied and eminentJy proper. Get away from the tradition that physical beauty is the onlv theme. and it is not difficult to behold in tha unromantic work of head and hands a beauty that is far beyond all bodily charms. HINTS FOR THE HOME. To Clean Straw Hats.—Mix two tablespoon- fuls of flowers of sulphur with the juice of a lemon and apply to the hat with a stiff nail brush. Rinse in cold water and hang in the shade to dry. Mackerel.—Wash clean, stuff with veal stuf- fing, and bake three-quarters of an hour in hot oven with 1 oz. of butter.—Take a. large mackerel, stuff in the same way, then enfold in a suet crust. Tie tightly in a cloth and boil well for an hour. Very good and cheap. Souffle Pudding.—Beat 2 oz. of fresh butter to a. crea.m, add to it 3 oz. of castor augar, 3 oz. of fine pastry flour, two well-beaten egge, and one pint of milk, beating all the time. Fla- vour with vanilla essence, pour into a greased fancy piedish, place in a good quick oven and cook for half an hour. Green Butter.—Nice for sandwiches. Two ounces parsley boiled till tender, one small tin of sardines skinned and boned, i lb. fresh but- ter. Well strain the parsley and pound and mix all well together. Pass through a fine sieve,. press into the shape of cream cheese and keep in a. cool place till wanted. Bath Buns.—Rub £ lb. of butter into 1 lb. of flour, add four beaten-up egg3 and a glassful of yeast. Set this before the fire to rise, then add 4 oz. of sifted sugar and a, few caraway seeds. Mould the paste into the shape of buns, strew a, few sugared caraways over the top, and bake them on tins in a fairly hot oven. Feather Cake.—Five oz. of flour, 5 oz. oi castor sugar, 3 oz. of butter, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, two eggs. Melt the butter, mix the flour, sugar, and baking powder, then add tho butter, beat the eggs well, and add them with two tablespoonfuls of milk. Bake in a, shallow tin. When baked cover with icing sugar and sprinkle cocoanut over it and cut into squares. Brown Bread.—This can be made from pure wheaten flour coarsely ground, or from a mix- ture of wheat barley and rye flour, in the pro- portion of two pounds of good wheaten flour to one of each of the others. Oatmeal may bo substituted for the barley flour, or added to the barley rye in the proportion of one-third. When making brown bread use a larger quan- tity of yeast and less water than for white, and knead for an hour. Brandy Pudding (original).—Line a pudding mould with stoned raisins a.nd sponge cakes (cut into slices), next to which put ratafias and macaroons, then a layer of raisins and a layer of sponge cakes, ratafias and macaroons in sue- cession, until the mould is full, sprinkle it at times with two glasses of brandy and 1 oz. su- gar: beat four whole eggs, add to them a pinch of almond milk, the grated peel of half a lemon and half a grated nutmeg; pour into the mould. Let the liquid sink into the solid part; then put tho lid of the mould tightly on, and boil it for half an hour, the right side up. This pudding is much liked.

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