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-t The Road to Love Ii

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PUBLISHED BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT. 1 t The Road to Love I i BY MADAlVJE ALBANIA! 1 l 'Author of "Capricious Caroline," "The Strongest of All Things." "Susannah and One Other," "LoTe and Louisa," "The Way to Win," etc.. etc. COPYRIGHT. CHAPTER XV. In the v,e<> that followed Varlev went down veral time? to Wvnclie. He oniy saw Ellen en he cai-e, for Miriam was ill. The news I Wher husband's accident had given her a terrible shock. A doctor pronounced that she •was suffering from nervous prostration, and prescribed bed. He also sent in a nurse, and EJ-ewe was this time doSnitely banished from Iter old post. The news p.bout Lord Norchester was very otr,eat,isfactoi-, inasmuch as they had to depend ( Entirely on *r-iegrams. His mother and sister would have gone out to him, but this he had Peremptorily refused to allow, neither did be ■ Je, Richard Varley join him. "Shall be at homo as soon as possible," was What he always repeated in his telegrams. His mother and sister were still at the hotel in Tornbury, and this was what Ellen felt was (Brushing the heart of Miriam. She had more than once met Lady Evelyn, and together the two giris had tried to §nd some way of moving Lady Norchester, the elder, so that she oould be induced to take up her residence at Wynche. and be there to receive him when ho came; but to every argument of her daughter's the do-ager Lac! Norchester was adamant. I "I shall only go Wynche," eho said, "if my boy needs me." It was a spell of great anxiety which Ellen khared to tho full, though indeed her trouble was far morn for Miriam Norchester than for the injured Lord Norchester. Once she spoke Very hly to Varley: > "I ho-Ve often heayd of » broken liMn. iiA thought it a mere expression, but now I feel differently, Mr. Varley, she is breaking her heart, and it seem so cowardly of us to stand by and do nothing." "You seem to be doinz a great de.1-I," said arley. "I knew that Evelyn would fall in Jove with you, but I hardly expected you to bring her so closely in sympathy with Miriam. After all, however, Evelyn is a child," he add- ed, "there i, nothing strong or hard, or bitter in her nature." "I think she is the sweetest prcson I have fiver met," s&id Ellen, warmly. And to this Richard Varley made answer Almost involuntarily: "I know one I hold to be even sweeter." But his tone was impersonal, and Ellen had tact the least idea that the word referred to herself. Indeed, 5h8 was a little disturbed and restless, and seemed as if she had something on 11 bar mind, a fact wh:ch Varley very quickly Realised. "I hope," he said to her with real anxiety, '"that you ar-1. not goinj to be ill too. All this fo a great strain on vour nerves, I am afraid, land I hear that you sit up with Miriam at flight. I don't think you ought to do that." "I cannot sleep," was Ellen's answer, "and am glad to do something." They talked on other thing's, but always the same troubled expression was on the girl's face. She seemed as though she were expecting some- thing disagreeable to happen, which was, as a gastter of fact, the case. Walter Barneith had reappeared on the scene. Be had written that morning to say that he intended coming again, as he had a matter of ithe most extreme importance to discuss with } Ellen. Indeed, whilst, he was still talking to Parley, her cousin's name was brought to her. ne information was given that. Mr. Barneith pns waiting in one of the smaller rooms, and The hoped that Miss Milner would see him at poce, as he was in rather a hurry To the butler Ellen slid, "Very well," and vrben he had gone she sat with contracted brows, biting li £ v lip. It was impossible for Richard Varley not to realise that die was now definitely worried, and he spoke on the spur of the moment. 1 "Is something troubling you; can I be of any Assistance ?'' "It is my cousin," Ellen answered him, "the ion of my aunt from whom I told you I had run away. He has found out that I am living bere. and although I have told him distinctJy that I have not the least desire to see him, he Insists upon coming." "Well, that is very easily settled," said Var- jtey, quietly. "'If you do not wish to see this gentleman, you shall not see him. I will sae him for you." Ellen got up quickly. Her first impulse was 10 make a protest, then -he smiled faintly. "I am afraid." she said, "lAdy Norchester Is just a little to blame. The first time that (Walter came here she saw him, and she treated him with kindness. She sent him back to the station in the motor. He has a mistaken idea of my position here." Varley listened with a frown. "I shall have very great pleasure in seeing your cousin and in explaining matters. Will you wait here, as I have something else to say to you." He walked out of the room, leaving Ellen with that faint smile lingering on her lips, but the troubled feeling at her heart, for woman's instinct is very sure. She felt that Walter Bar- neith would not be dismissed out of her life to easily. While she sat pondering, Varley re- turned. "Mr. Bameith has gone," he said. "I offered bim the motor, but he had a fly already. > I impressed upon him that if he had anything to communicate to you the po-t was a very great facility "You are very kind," said Ellen, and indeed tehe felt again that sense of extraordinary com- fort which Varley's presence invariably signi- fied. "You had something more to say to me?" she queried. "Well, no. nothing of any importance, only I wanted to keep you here. I wanted to talk a little more about yourself." But Ellen put out her hand. "Oh! no, please," she said. "It w such a fcelief to talk about something elso. When do you think it possible that Lord Norchester can pomo here?" "I should not be surprisednt his arriving at any moment," Varley answered, then he added thoughtfully, "Although on the other hand. I am a little surprised that he should be coming back to Wynche at all. Sometimes I am half afraid he has been more hurt than we imagine. Ho was so resolved upon staying away some time when ho left." "I want him to coma back," said Ellen, im- pulsively. "I do not think he ought to have

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-t The Road to Love Ii