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i POET'S CORNER. ;

-t The Road to Love Ii

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A PHENOMENAL SUCCESS.

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FOR MATRON AND MAID.

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FOR MATRON AND MAID. THE REAL GIRL. There are some girls who. like the porcu- pine, turn their bristles to the world. The ma- ."i v, unfortunately, lire charming to the ex- •^ric.r and a bitter disap)>omttncni to those who dip within. J r a man's valet, holds the key to his char- acter, it takes the onlooker upon family life to know a girl as she is, not an she poses to tw. The family itself is not always a competent judsjo of tbo nature of its different members. MotneHy Icve and fatherly affection arc great Winders, and the frankness of brother or sister is as apt to underesiinr.ato as overestimate a girl's real nature. But the <Tl.est in that family, if she stays long enough, is sure to have a shrewd idea of actual values. WIIEN MAKING BLOUSES. Several nice points there aro in the fitting of a shirt blouse that every home sewer does not know and many dressmakers neglect. Almost invariably after the seams of a shirt blouse have been put together with a fair degree of accu- racy, tho novice will generally make the mis- take of trying to fit the sleeve before the col- lar is fastened on. This last is not possible. The blouse should be put on the wearer, or on a. figure, with the seams tacked only. A neckband or a collar finished at its lower edge, acd of the correct length, should be laid over the blouse and around the neck, then carefully pinned fast so that there are no puckers in the biojisc. With the garment now in hand, the collar is tacked exactly as it was pinned, and then the sleeve tacked in. VERY COMPANIONABLE. The girl who knows how to find happiness as she goes along, a little to-day, a bit to-night, and just a trifle more to-jnorrow, is a. most "liv- able" person. Geniuses may leave legacies of great achievement to futuro generations, but they are not always happy companions to live with. Nor arc many so-called successful men and women. They are too occupied by the task of being successful and brilliant to enjoy life, and they think that he who seeks and is often content with small pleasures is rather a weakling. But if there were no people content to do the small things of the world, what a dreary desert life would be fer the majority. W RENOVATIONS. Tihere is nothing magical about tho art of dyeing. It is a. group of facts, and the expert is the one who has the ability to keep these facts in mind to draw from as the occasion requires. first., study the fabric. Make yourself famil- iar with the several fibres that enter into the composition of the different materials. This can be determined sometimes by a single ex- amination, but often the mixture is of such a nature that experts arc baffled. Generally this can be determined by ravelling out the threads each way of the cloth, from a small piece, and trying them in a flame. Cotton burns freely without odour; wool singes, with but very little flame and gives out a. disagreeable odour, as of burning horn or hair; silk burM more freely than cotton, and care should be taken to note the difference, for cotton masquerades in unexpected places as silk, and gives trouble to the unsuspecting dyer. HYGIENIC SLEEP. The first great rule for hygienic sleep is a clean, well-made bed, with covers which are warm, but not burdensome. The experienced woman who is furnishing a home knows that if there is one point in which she is justified in extravagance it is in the matter of good mattresses and a plentiful supply of bedclothing. When a woman complains of sleeping poorly at night, and you know that her bed is com- fortable and scientifically made, and her room carefully ventilated, there is yet the question of her garb for sleeping to be considered be- fore thinking that there is anything physically or mentally at fault with her. TWO MARKS OF BEAUTY. Beautiful eyes and brows are. in one sense, a. special gift of nature. Many a plain woman is redeemed by fine eyes; many a, pretty face spoiled by red-rimmed, dull, lustreless eyes. But at the same time, a great deal may be done to make even unpromising eyes clear and at- tractive, to render eyes which are only passably pretty really beautiful. Attention to the general health will go far to make the eyes clear and bright and prevent fatigue, even when they are called upon to do a great deal of work. Have you never noticed the dull eyes of a person afflicted with dyspepsia, the yellow tinge of overfeeding and neglected liver; the lustre- less eyes of the woman who sleeps in an ill- ventilated room, who takes no exercise, and spends all her spare time reading qovels over the fire? POINTS OF FASHION. Shepherd check Princess gowns are rather like coats. Their fastening goes over to the left hip, and then buttons down to the hem. Big revers of satin or chiffon velvet are the up-to-date set-off. The over-sleeve that nearly reaches the elbow is. becoming more and more general. It belongs to the dress, whilst the long sleeve is part of the guimpe. "Braiding" is done witb fine silk ribbon on some of the smart net blouses. Hand-painted blousea of lace are now being worn with dressy tailored suits. Artistic gowns of neutral tones are fashioned of flexible linen or rep. Self-bands coarsely embroidered with Russian, Egyptian, or Bulgarian designs decorate these dresses. Most effective tailor-made gowns a.re being ordered of mohair. Satin rather than dull silk is chosen as the under-dress for coarse net blouses and gowns. Many of the new jabots a.nd collars have tiny bands of colour or coloured embroidery at the top. Embroidered chantilly is becoming a tremen- dous favourite for guimpes and sleeves. Redingotes of fine white sergo braided with soutache are for summer wear. They are cut long and loose, and have big pearl buttons for fastenings. HINTS FOR THE HOME. Renovating Stained Boards.—If the stained boards of your floor have become light with constant wear, rub well with paraffin oil, and they will become beautifully dark; then polish with beeswax and turpentine. Home Remedy for Relieving Bronchitis.— Take 2 oz. of honey, 1 oz. olive oil, yolks of throe new laid eggs, and the juice of three le- mons. A teaspoonful to be taken four or are times a day. Most splendid recipe. Prevent Custard from Curdling.—When mak- ing boiled custard the milk should be made thoroughly hot before being added to the eggs. If it should qome to boiling point it will not curdle. It ij also a great improvement to the custard. Creamed Whiting.—Take two filleted whit- ing, lay in buttered dish (a macaroni dish would be suitable), season with pepper and salt, and^ a small finely-chopped onion, and pour over fish a gill of cream. Grate some cheese on top, and bake till a light brown. Very delicious, and a change from ordinary cooked fish. Whit. ing cooked this way- resembles sole. Delicious Rhubarb Jelly.—-Get some fresh red rhubarb, wash, wipe, but don't peal. Cut I up and put in a preserving pan, with one large cup of water. Simmer till juicG is extracted, strain through a jelly bag, and 1 lb. lump sugar to each large cup of juice. Stir till it boils, boil for ten minutes or longer if it does not appear firm. Pour into pots, store in a cool dry place. Marmalade Cake.—Take one and a-half cup- fuls of milk, half a cupful of castor sugar, half a teaspoonful of carbonate of soda, a pinch of tartaric acid,' one egg. Mix the flour, soda, and acid in a basin, whisk the egg. put in the milk, whisk again; add the marmalade to the milk, stir well, and add the other ingredients. Pour on a flat buttered tin, and bake in a slow oven for half an hour. Coffee "Scones.—Sift together twice a cupful of flour, half a cupful of sugar, half a tea- spoonful of salt, half a teaspoonful of ground cinnamon, a heaping teaspoonful of baking powder. Mix this into a soft dough with four tabiespoonfuls of melted butter, a well-beaten eggs, and half a cupful of sweet milk. Spread in a shallow pan, sprinkle thickly with sugar and cinnamon, and bake in a quick oven. Serve hot with butter or jam. Lemon Butter and Cocoanut Tartlets.—For short crust, rub from 4 oz. to 6 oz. of butter, according to richness of pastry desired, into i lb. flour; add a dessertspoonful of castor sugar; beat the yolk of an egg with two table- spoonsful of cold water, add gradually to the flour and mix to a paste. Pastry must not be too stiff, but the less water used the shorter the crust will be. Roll out £ in. in thickness; line pattypans, prick twice with a fork, bake a light brown, brush over with an egg, then fill cases with lemon butter. Sprinkle liberally with desiccated cocoanut. Have you anything to Sell? Advertise in our Want Columns, and it ia as good as sold.

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DISTRESSING BRONCHITIS,

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-t The Road to Love Ii