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-----CORRESPONDENCE,

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

DANGER SPOTS.

VAYNOR EASTER. VESTRY.,

THE "GROUP" AND COUNCILLOR…

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COUNCILLOR C. GRIFFTTTTS AND…

WELSH DISESTABLISHMENT.

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WELSH DISESTABLISHMENT. Sir,-I have nothing to do with the manrj eirs or smart sayings of "Anthropos." I desire solely to deal with his statements. In an interim contribution to the debate, he places before your readers his views on the Church as "estab- lished by law." He takes up the following position: "Strictly speaking, the Church of England, as distinct from the Church of Rome, can trace its pedigree no further back than the time of Henry VIII." He further avers that "the establishment" was brought about by the Act of Uniformity, and that as a result the King is the head of the Church in contra- distinction to the Roman Catholic and the dis- senting bodies." Let Dr. Creighton, an the first place, answer this strajige conception of his- tory "Some people talk sometimes as if the Church came into being as a branch of the Roman Church; or as if, at some period of its history, it was merged in the Roman Church. It had varying relations with the Roman Church, which were regulated, not by the claims of Rome, but by the advantage to be gained by England. I cannot put what seems to me to be the historical truth more clearly than in this form; tho Church in England, while retaining its-own continuity in all essen- tials, admitted the papal jurisdiction on grounds of utility, and thus passed through a long per- iod in which it discovered that that jurisdic- tion was dangerous to Church and nation alike" ("The Church and the Nation," p. 186). Mr. Justice Phillimoro said, in giving judgment in the eases "Bell v. Marsham" and ''Marshall v. Graham": "The accepted legal doctrine, as to wjygki^.co^roverey, iiie j Church of England was a continuous body from its earliest establishment ia Saxon times" ("Times" report) The fallacy enunciated by your Liberationisf is refuted by the testimony of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the year 995. These are the words: "And soon he"— Alfric, Archbishop of Canterbury—"sent for all the wisest men he anywhere knew of. and also the old men who were able to say the i-oothast how each thing had been in this land in the days of their elders, in addi tion to what he himself had learned from book: and from wise men. Him told the very old men. as well as clergy and laity. that their eid-ers had told them how it had been establishNl by iaw soon after St. Augustine came to this land." "An thropos" will thus see that as far back as 995 A.D. the Church was "established by law." Clever and unscrupulous though Henry VIII. 'vas, he would hardly have managed to direct the affairs of the kingdom six hundred years before he was born "Anthropos" evidently trusts the German- made history of Makower. Will he please listen to his view: "The constitution of the Church was o:1lv changed at the Reformation in England so far as seemed absolutely necessary to the attainment of the ends which the Re formation proposed. Accordingly, the ecclesi- astical offices in the country. remained nearly unaltered. The real changes which en- sued relate almost exclusively to the connexion of National Church with the Pope they con- sist in the complete abolition of all papal auth- ority in England, and in the transference of al- most all rights of government previously exer- cised by the Pope to tho English sovereign." If "Anthropos" knows anything at all, he must kno v that the last sentence succinctly describe, the limits of "royal supremacy," and he knows also that as far back as the days of tho Con- fessor this supremacy was exercised. The laws of that sovereign state that the king is ap- pointed "to this end, that he should rule and defend the kingdom and the Lord's people; and above all Holy Crch." The papist Queen Mary described herself ".Mary, by the Grace of God. Supreme Head of the Church of Eng- land. It will thus be seen that the allegations of "Anthropos" are home-made history construc- ted to prop up a theory that no respectable his- torian would advance. The Kinc is supreme over all persons and societies in this realm, and it is he that decides disputes respecting property, doctrine, and disa pline amongst Dis- senters as well as Churchpeople. Henry VIII. himself declared (1533) in a letter to the clergy: "Christ is indeed the only and supreme Lord as we confess Him in the Church daily As to spiritual things, they—the clergy—have no worldly nor temporal head, but only Christ" (Wiikins, iii., 762). Finally, Mr. Aubrey Moore, in his "History of the Reformation." writes as follows: "The continuity of the Eng"- lish Church was the first principle of the Eng- lish Reformation." I assert without fear of con- traduction, that the Church was not crea-ted- made, nor called into being by Henry VIII., and that in law her pos-essions. all voluntarily acquired, and her doctrines, are her own by every Tight. Let "Anthropos" produce one single scrap of evidence to the contrary—if he can. Until he is able to do so, let him wipe his and leave the Church alone.—Yours, etc.. CHURCHMAN.

THE ORIGIN OF TITHE.

._-------THE REV. D. ELLIS…

p THE CATHOLIC CHURCH ANr.…

--, ; A CHURCHYARD COUGH.I

QUOITS.) f

Oxo at the Imperial Exhibition,…

----------THE CHRONICLES OFI…

A MODEL OF CYCLING PERFECTION.

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THE "GROUP" AND COUNCILLOR…