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CORRESPONDENCE. i -..../'-/"')

--....----........ . THE MERTHYR…

THE I.L P. ACTION APPROVED.

THE ALLOTMENT GARDENS AT CYFARTHFA.

MINERS OUT OF WORK FUND.

REV. MORGAN JENKINS, ABERCYNON,…

SOCIALISM AND THE CATHOLIC…

-.1 WELSH DISESTABLISHMENI

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.1 WELSH DISESTABLISHMEN I Sir,—I do not know that I should have taken any notice of the letter of "Anthropos," which appeared in your issue of April 24, had it not been for the unfair use which he makes of some words of the historian, Professor Free- man. If any of your readers will take the trou- ble to refer to his little book, "Disestablish- ment and Disendowment: What are they?" (a most useful little book which only costs six- pence) they will find the quotation on page 49. But, as they will see at once, the words do not give Freeman's own opinion, they are the sup- posed words of someone who is arguing in fav- our of disestablishment. The paragraph begins: "The argument in favour of such a course would seem to be this," and then later on come the words quoted by "Anthropos" "But now that the Church, etc." It is because I protest strongly against inaccurate and unfair quota- tions that I take notice of the letter. But as I am writing, it may be worth while to notice some other points. "Anthropos" does not seem to understand that whilst the King, through the Prime Min- ister, nominates a person to be Bishop or Arch- bishop, the King cannot make him a Bishop. He does not become a Bishop till he has been consecrated by other Bishops—the ap- pointed ministers of the Church. And just as the State cannot make a Bishop, so the State does not pay him. All Bishops, including the Welsh Bishops, an paid out of funds which are the property of the Church. This can be very easily proved, because if the State paid the Bishops there would have to be provision made in the annual Budget, and the sum of money necessary would have to be voted annu- ally by Parliament. If "Anthropos" doubts this, will he kindly give your readers the ac- counts in the Parliamentary votes which pay the stipends of the Bishops? It will take him his lifetime to find them. Again, he tries to draw a distinction between what he calls private endowments of the Church, and ancient endowments. There is no such distinction, a Let me refer him again to Freeman's book, page 55, "People sometimes forget that there are such things as dissenting endowments. But, though they are not of any very great amount, and though, of course, they cannot be of any very ancient date, there are such things, and, where they exist, the law pro- tects them. Now the difference between these endowments and the endowments of the Church is simply this, that the endowments of the Church are much greater in extent, and the mass of them are much older in date, than the endowments of dissenting bodies. All alike are gifts made by different persons at different times in ways which the law allowed at the time when they were given." Once again he says, "The unanimous voice of tho Welsh peo- ple is for the Disestablishment and Disendow- ment of the Church of England." At the last election over 50,000 voted for the Conservative candidates. Is this what "Anthropos" calls a unanimous vote? And, further, only 15 of the 34 Radical members mentioned the subject of Disestablishment in their election addresses. Personally, I believo that if this question could be put simply and solely to the electors of Wales the majority would be found to be in favour of the Church, and not against it.—Yours, etc., WM. GODFREY, Organising secretary for Church Defence in South Wales* Church Defence Offices, Cardiff. t

THE MEANING OF ESTABLISHMENT.

THE CHURCH AND ITS ENDOWMENTS.

MARRIED LADIES. -.:--

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Physical Culture in Quakers'…

.Whitsuntide at Pontypool."…

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