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POET'S CORNER.

The Road to Love

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PUBLISHED BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT. The Road to Love BY MADAME ALBANESI, Author of '"Capricious Caroline," "The Strongest of All Things," "Susannah and One Other," "Love and Louisa," "The Way to Win," etc., etc. COPYRIGHT. CHAPTER XI. Eu[ there were many, many times in the da\s which followed, when Ellen Miiner won- dered ivhether she would have strength and couraga to stand firm to the duties she had so willingly accepted. Varley had promised to run down very soon, but he had not been. He had written Ellen a few lines hoping that she was comfortable, and that if any matter cropped up which she want- ed altered, would she bo so good as to let him know, and it should be at once, attended to. To this she had an.zrta¿,t;. a few words. Dear Mr, Varley,- When you come to Wynch-s, there are many things which I should like to discuss with you. She did not tell him if she were well or com- fortable. She avoided all references to her i position She felt intuitively that he would kIlow far better than she could tell him the difficulties of that position. The first attempt at authority over the servants had not be?n al- together a triumph. W hen they reached the dining room that evening, they had found the butler absent from his work, and the same footman to whom Ellen had given the orders rearing the same untidy look, took the butler's place. This was enough to throw Lady Norchester into one of her wild moments of passion. She dismissed the footman from her presence, but she did it with no regard to dignity. It seem- ed to Ellen that it was impossible for her to step forward and assume too much authority, but she really suffered what was nothing less than a wrangle between Lady Norche3ter and her footman. Eventually one of the mads had waited on them, and they had partaken of a very indifferent dinner. At every turn something new called for an explosive invective from Lady Norchester. Finaliy she had turned to Ellen and said "NoW', you see what goes on here, and I'd like to ask you what would you do if you were me 9" And Ellen bad answered hotly, and yet with hai-iteiir "I should dismiss all these servants." The word spread very quickly to the kitchens that Ellen was a factor to bo counted with. Instantly she became the object of suspicion and dislike. From Crewe indeed she received something like dislike, and on poor Eliza, the housemaid, was visited the wrath of the rest of her fellow servants because she spoke enthusi- astically about the young lady who had come to Wynche. Ellen was not daunted, however, trying as the whole situation became. She frequently ranged herself in front of Lady Norchester, and put forward the whole strength of her influence to work certain dangers out of the poor crea- ture's tife. To start with, she gTappled with the question of stimulants. She had gone right to the poisonous centre of this terrible habit. She traced it to Crcw-e. Indeed she could not stop Eliza ohattering. and from this source the learnt that it was the maid's habit to encour- age her mistress to drink brandy under the piea, that she needed it for her health. Ellen was resolved that this should stop im- mediately. She went to work frankly. A few days had sufficed to show her that among the good qualities which Miriam possessed was one of loyalty. Evidently her mother had been the greaf love and the great loss of her life before her marriage: and she clung to the tnemory of that mother in a way that was path- etic then Ellen was convinced that she had the Ftrongest desire to be loyal about her husband. Once she had declared. "I have never eared much for anvbody: but when I do care I do care; and I'd do anything In the world for anybody I love." "1 hope you are going to earn for me," Ellen had answered to this. "I should value your friendship more than I can possibly tell you." "Why, of coursa, I care for vou," Lady Nor- chester had answered. "I told you that the fipst night you came, didn't I? You've got to Jet me do something to show you how much I do care." 'I was just going to ask you to do some- thing," Ellen answered; and then she spoke out what she had on her mind. Miriam's face had flushed a littlo uncomfort- ably. "r only take brandy when I feel faint," she Enid. "But you mustn't feel faint," was Ellen's reply. "I am going to induce you to go out more. I am sure you don't realiso how beauti- ful your own possessions are. I went for a Ion,; walk in tha gardens this morning before breakfast, and I wished all the timo you had been with me." Miriam, however, was very difficult to net out of the house. On one occasion after Ellen had been there some littlo while, she did sug- 'g-est they should go for a long drive; but the result was not satisfactory. Although they met very few people, those whom they did meet

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COLDS IN MAY.

FOR THE YOUNG FOLKS,

FOR MATRON AND MAID.¡

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FUN AND FANCY.I

The Road to Love