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Rhymney Valley EchoesI

Miners' Federation.

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Gellygaer and the County Council. A CLAIM FOR £ 1,200. j VIGOROUS PROTEST. At the meeting of the Gcllysraor District Council, on Monday, Mr. W. B. Lloyd, as chairman of the overseers, said he felt. it his duty to bring before the Council a claim of £1,200, which had been made upon them by the County Council in the poor rale of the parish. This arose, he said, through the County Council having purchased six acres of land at Peng-am, behind the school, for a recreation ground, which was to cost 602 per acre (shame!) The price was not inclusive of the minerals, but only for the surface, and the County Council claimed one-third of the total amount- as the share of Geliygaer. Mr. Lloyd pointed out that the Monmouthshire authori- ties had declined to pay anything, and so he proposed that the Clerk be instructed to see the Board of Guardians and inquire into this, and that the parish should not pay it until they had received further information and advice on the subject. It seemed hard lines that the over- seers should be faced with such a demand on the first day of taking office. The County Council had paid four times too much for the land, and it was a shame that this should have been done without the parish having any voice in the matter. The Clerk said he had no further informa- tion on the subject than what Mr. Lloyd had stated. The call on Gelly^er was a tremend- ously heavy one-over Lio.coo. The Rector of Geliygaer said he would give the Council some of the first principles and rudi- ments of this matter. A man named Edward Lewis had left certain land for certain pur- poses,. viz., for the benefit of the intermediate schools of the parish. Some vear3 ago there was a great fight as to whether these lands should be taken over or not by the County Council. The parish was somewhat divided. and the matter was lost, and the County Coun- cil did, as a matter, of fact, enter into posses- sion of the lands, revenues, and accumulated funds of the Edward Lewis charity. lie (the Rector) did his best there acainst it. as also (lid the father of their Clerk, the late Mr. Frank James, and several others who had gone to their reet. The County Council were, however, now in possession, a.nd the lands re- mained vested in trustees of the charity funds, but the County Council had the management of them. They received, he believed, originally £ 23,000 in hard cash but had certainly given t.hem something back,' though, as it were at the point of the bayonet. They were forced under the scheme to Vive GellY. iaer £1,500, but had given only £ 9001' and thus £ 600 a year had been saved. They (the County Council) erected a Girls' Schooi at Hengoed out of tho funds. and restored the Pengam Schools out of the funds of the Lewis endowment. But what was the en- dowment now ? There was a coal mine in it which would produce immense revenues which would go to the common funds of the Council, whilst Geliygaer would only get what came to it under the scheme. He (the Rector) was once Chairman of the Board of Governors, but re- signed-to the regret of some. but, doubtless, to the gratification of others. The County de- cided to erect a hostel at Hengoed which would cost about £ 4,000. How was that money to be found? He would have raised no objection to it if they had decided to pay for it themselves, but they had not consulted the Governors nor even allowed them to see the plans or tenders nor anything else. They then turned round and said: "You, in Geliygaer, who have had no voice in this 'will have to pay for it out of the revenue intended for the maintenance of the schools, and repay the outlay in thirty years out of the money which ought to have gone for the education of the children of the workmg classes of, the district." -He (the Rector) refused to be a party to it, but others yielded to the deci- sion. The County Council might have had. the land, at an agricultural price years ago, but said it would not buy it then. It was the pro- crastination of the County Council and their refusal to allow the trustees to widen the ac- cess to the land that had caused the present position. There was a conflict between the two sides of the river about these schools, and the County Council said to Bedwellty and Mvnvddislwyn: "Inasmuch as you share in the privileges of the schools you ought to pay some- thing for that land." The Monmouthshire peo- ple, however refused to pay a penny, con- tending that the rights they enjoyed at the Pen- gam School they did not owe to Glamorgan at all. Why, therefore (the Rector asked) should Geliygaer be requested to pay this £ 1,200. If there were no funds at the present moment there would be in time when the revenues were being divided from the coal underneath, and, therefore, the matter should remain until the funds would permit. It was one of those things which had marked the attitude of the County Council in their dealings with Gelly- gaer. They had neTer treated the parish in a generous and proper way. They had always tried to (rive as little as possible. Whether the Council had any choice in refusing to pay this money he did not know, but the Subject was one which their clerk should advise them as to whether this was really due, and m view of the fact too, that Monmouthshire had refused to pay what the Glamorgan County. Council had said it, ought to pay. He felt they ought to protest to their utmost against paying this money at all It was a great shame—he knew of no other word to express his nund better to apply to treatment of this kind-in calling upon the ratepayers of Geliygaer when there were ample means to defray the expense of the pur- chase. He would second Mr. Lloyd's proposal. —This course was unanimously agreed to.

WOMEN WHO NAG.

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GELLYGAER DISTRICT COUNCILI

I iJ " ~r — EVERY WOMAN.

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