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--,-----_. CORRESPONDENCE.…

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

CATHOLIC TEACHERS AT DOWLAIS…

MR. J. O'GRADY, M.P., ON THE…

CAN A CATHOLIC BE A SOCIALIST?

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A MERTHYR VALE SOCIAL DEMOCRAT.

WELSH DISESTABLISHMENT.

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WELSH DISESTABLISHMENT. Sir,—Your correspondent, who signs himself "Churchman," iE, judging from his questions, apparently ignorant of what establishment a.nd endowment mean. No one denies that the Church of England raises big sums of money by voluntary methods to maintain and equip their schools and various other organisations to propagate their particular doctrines. It is true also that they receive grants from the State, which ultimately come from the rates, without tho people having any control over those schools and various organisations. It is certainly not inconsistent to say that the Church as a religious institution is endowed by tho State, even in (ace of the fact that the Church raises big sums of money by voluntary methods, as such is the case in reality. His questions are not to the point. Does "Church- man" deny that the "Church" receives State endowments? Who appoints the Archbishop of Canterbury, and where does he get his £15,000 a vear from ? Where do the bishops and the clergy get their salaries from? But we must confine ourselves to the Estab- lished Church in Wales. For an exhaustive treatment of tho question, I would recommend "Churchman" to the brilliant and unanswerable speech of Mr. Asquith in introducing the Welsh Disestablishment- Bill of 1335. Mr. Asquith estimates the value of Church endowments in Wales at £279,000 a year. Tho voluntary con- tributions of the Church of England in Wales amount to £29ó,412 a year. The Bishop of St. David's receives £4,500 a year; each of the other three bishops £.1,200 a year; and cacb of the four Welsh deans £700 a year. Each Welsh cathedral has "residential canons," who get £1,400 a yea.r-£5,600 in all. This money all comes from the endowments; and yet St. Asaph nor St. David's has more than 2,000 population. Nonconformists have no desire to deprive the Church of private endowments that legally belong to it. All private bene- factions created since 1705 will be excluded from the operations of the Bill, and, as I understand, all ancient endowments will be placed under the control of a Commission, and applied for a variety of specified purposes. All that is asked is that the ancient, national endowments, granted at a time when there was but one Church, and when every citizen of the country was supposed to be a member of that Church, should be surrendered for common public use The original endowments were intended for 113.- tional rather than for denominational and sec- tarian purposes. In Wales and Monmouthshire the Church of England has ceased to be the national Church. It is not only an alien im- portation, and, therefore, out of touch with Welsh aspirations and ideals, but is the institu- tion which represents the reactionary forces which block the way to the social uplifting and improvement of the people. Dr. Arnold, of Rugby, said: "The Church of England clergy have, from Elizabeth's time downwards, been a party opposed to the cause if improvement." Canon Molesworth says: "The clergy offered determined opposition to every proposal for the extension of civil and religious liberty." "The Church of England was in favour of the slave trade; against the repeal of the Test and Cor- poration Acts; against Parliamentary and Mu- nicipal Reform; against the repeal of the Corn Laws; against all education beyond the sim- plest elements. It was a worldly clerical digarchy" ("Times," October 9th, 1876). It is maintained upon good grounds that the ancient Church of Wales was at one time distinct from, and independent of. both Rome and Canter- bury. "It was different from them in its or- ganisation, in its customs, and its govern- ment. It was only by force of arms that the Welsh Church was made subject to Rome. It is on1,7 bv forca of temporal power that th3 Church in Wales to-day remains subject to Can- terbury." The unanimous voice of the Welsh people is for Disestablishment and Disendowment of the Church of England. The communicants in the Church of England in Wales number 195,000, while the communicants in the Free Churches in Wa-Ieg number 530,000; Sunday Schoo! schol- ars in the Church of England number 1S2;243, a.nd those in the Free Churches in Wales 630,000. The total population of Wales is 2,033,000. The Church of England in Wales provides sitting- room for 460.000; the Free Churches in Wales sitting room for 1,568,000. Although it is the Church of the rich, its volun- tary contributions only amounted to £296,412 last year, while the voluntary contributions of the Welsh Free Churches, which are tho churches of the poor, amounted to In the face of these figures, the Church of Eng- land in Wales cannot claim to be the national Church.. The reasonableness of this contention is admitted by the appointment of tha "Welsh Church Commission" to inquire into the ori- gin, nature, amount, and application of the temporalities, endowments, and other proper- ties of the Church of England in Wales and Monmouthshire, and into the provision made and work done by the Churches of all denomi- nations in Wales and Monmouthshire for the spiritual welfare of the people, and the extent to which the people avail themselves of such provision, and to report thereon. Nonconformists are not splitting hairs over technical financial points. Their policy is not a policy of grab. It has been suggested in some quarters thát. he surplus endowments should be equally divided between the various religious institutions in order to bring them ai' under State patronage and control. This sug- gestion is contrary to the spirit of the Welsh Disestablishment movement, which is based up- on the principle that Establishment is injurious to the Church. Nonconformists are not han- kering for endowments and State privileges, but for complete religious equality, and for the establishment of all Churches upon a spiritual basis, as the only solution of the problem consistent with Christianity. "Churchman" wag very unfortunate in his sentiment "that there is nothing so invincible as uncharitable- ness, the fountain from which all this male- volence against the Church springs," consid- ering that he is a memberi of a Church, under whose canons to-day, dissent is called "no- torious contumacy," and is classed with "other notable crimes." The whole and consistent at- titude of the Church of England towards Dis- sent is one of invincible uncharitableness. the fountain from which all this malevolence against Dissent springs. This "uncharitabte- noss" is to be traced to two causes. First. to the Act of Uniformity in 1662, when the An- glican Church was established by law, and was placed in a position of privilege as the Ciiurch of the State. Next, to the claims of the Estab- lished Church to the possession of a spiritual gift of endowment not possessed by other Churches—it claims, through its bishops, the exclusive right to apostolical succession. In earlier times the emphasis was laid on the State connection, and Dissent was regarded as an connection, and Dissent was regarded as an offence aeainst the State; but now the empha- sis has changed to the Apostolical succession. Now the doctrine is: "No security for salvation outside the true Church, and no true Church without bishops, whose consecration by a valid rite can be traced from the time of the Apos- tles." Let anyone read the correspondence be- t'^een the Bishop of Birmingham and Canon TTenslev Heason. which appeared lately in "The Times," regarding the invitation to Canon Hen- 11 son by Mr. Jowett to preach af the Digbeth Institute, in order to see on which side the uncharitableness lies. The truth is there are no reasonable grounds for maintaining the es- tablishment of the Church of Engtand.. I must close this rather long letter with a quotation from Freeman. '"The Church is no longer co-extensive with the nation now that it has ceased to be the nation in its religious .as- pect: now that is only one religious body among many, there is, it may be argued, no longer an reason why i should enioy any privileges which a.re not enjoyed by other religious bod- ies, or why it should be subject to control to which other religious bodies are not subject To carry out this rule we should have to repeal all laws by which the Established Church i! recognised in a way in which other religious bodies are not recognised."—I am, yours etc., ANTHROPOS.

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--_-------Mysteries of Memory.

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CAN A CATHOLIC BE A SOCIALIST?