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Mountain Ash Evening Classes.

MISKIN.

Dance at Miskin.

PENRHIWCEIBER.

Penrhiwceiber Collier's Trip…

ABERCYNON.

CWMBACH.

GODREAMAN.

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MOUNTAIN ASH.

The Vicar of Mountain Ash…

I MOUNTAIN ASH POLICE COURT

[No title]

Mountain Ash Easter Eisteddfod.

Mountain Ash Easter Eisteddfod.

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conductor, and a second prize of £ 10.—Dr. M'Naught said that the test piece for this competition was one of the most remarkable pieces ever composed for malo voice parties. He awarded the following marks:—No. 1, 61 marks out of a possible 80; No. 2, 66; No. 3, 63; No. 4, 51; No. 5, 70; No. 6, 63; No. 7, 72; and No. 8, 69. The winners of the first prize were, therefore, Mountain Ash, and Kenfig Hill the second prize. ADJUDICATOR'S REMARKS ON THE RECITATIONS. In view of the diversity of opinion which has been manifested on recitations in various Eis- teddfodau and the consequent doubt which exists, among reciters as t^> the style which will suit the adjudicators, the following remarks ad- dressed to the reciters at the Mountain Ash Eisteddfod by Mr. J. Henry Davies, of Ynyshir, Associate of the College of Reciters, London, after a consultation with his fellow adjudicat- ors (Rev. D. Jeremy Jones, Mountain Ash, and Councillor Silas Williams, Ynysybwl) will be read with interest:—"You would like to know upon what basis I have been adjudicating, and by what means I arrived at my decision. I think it is quite fair that you should know—es- pecially in the face of the uncertainty exper- ienced by reciters in the past—in regard to the very varied tastes of different adjudicators who have been jduging the reciters' efforts at differ- ent Eisteddfodau. It is very probable that some of you, before coming here to-day, asked questions similar to the following: What are the tastes of to-day's recitation adjudicators? Do they like modulation of voice? Are they favourable to gestures? Do they condemn a dramatic rendering—something similar to the performance of old time and old fashioned Methodist ministers? I have been thinking over this matter, and after looking through the works of eminent masters on elocution, inciud) ing Bell, Chambers, Kirton, Garry, and last, but not least, Dr. Cynonfardd Edwards, I have arrived at a method which I consider to be a fair and proper basi; to adjudicate your recita- tions. I hope that all who will take upon them- selves the responsibility of deciding keen and imoortant contests in the lofty art of elocution will adopt sonw such scheme, so that competi- tors may know that they are scientifically judged, and that they do not cater for faddists. I give a maximum of 60 marks, make up as follows: 10 for correctness of rendering, good punctuation, and articulation 10 for interpreta- tion—that is, correctly expressing the sense, or conveying the ideas set forth by the author; 10 for voice—I maintain that the voice to the reciter is quite as important as to the singer; I take into consideration quality of voice, vol- ume, compass, modulation, and change of key for different characters. 10 for gestures; much has been said as to gestures, and niaty recitejes have, I am sorry to say, lost prizes through using proper and effective gestures. If the adjudicators looked up authorities on the art of elocution, their der-izions woinld have been different. The authorities which I have prev- iously mentioned advocate appropriate and nat- ural gestures. I assert thatgestlIres to the re- citer are what the accompaniment of a musical instrument is to the singer—both aid to a better performance. And do not reciters in gesture appeal, dismiss, threaten, display joy and grief, defy and deny, express love, hatred and fear, indicate persons, places, and things? Gestures, if appropriate, graceful, and natural, aid the performance of the reciter. Bsware of too many gestures; too many are worse than too few, and never allow gesture nor facial expres- sion to become meaningless—in a word, be natural. 20 for general effect, viz.. word paint- ing, artistic touches, graceful bodily move- ments, and general spirit and demeanour of the reciter. ■ ♦

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