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POET'S CORNER.

The Road to Love

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PUBLISHED BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT. The Road to Love BY MADAME ALBANESr, Author of "Capricious Caroline," "The Strongest of All Things," "Susannah and One Other," "Love and viiga." "The Way to Win," etc.. etc. COPY iUGHTr SYNOPSIS OP PREVIOUS CHAPTERS. CHAPTERS I. & II. Richard Varlcy hears of the accident which has befallen Sir Patrick Mil. I per on the hunting field. The landlady at the inn where he is staying informs him that. Sir Pat- rick k dead. After dinner Richard Varley walks over to Corbyn- Court. lie leaves his card, ancl sends a mesy^ge of sympathy to Sir Patrick's only child, Ellen Milner. Although he is due back in London on the following day, he is almost mind- ed to stay awl offer his services to Ellen Milner. 'A wire fro Dorchester. saying he is leaving Eng- land immediately and must seo him before he de- parts, causes him to change his mind. He goes to London next day. Sir Patrick made a foolish mar- riage, but Ellen's mother died when she was two years old. Since that time she had groinn up in her father's society. She knew no relatives, and had no women friends. She had heard of her mother's sister. Mrs. Barneith, and her son and two daugh- ters. Her aunt Margaret makes her an offer to fome and livo with her and share household ex- penses. Ellen has a little over a hundred a year, through a life assurance, and her lawyers advise her to fall in with Mrs. Barneith's proposition. She does so, and spends the dreary winter months in exile in a sordid little home, amidst most uncongenial sur- roundings, in a north countr* town. She finds the atmosphere of her aunt and cousins narrow, and constricting, r.nd in the early spring months decides to make her cseape. At a junction railway station he sees a young man. whose breezy, well-bred man- ner attracts her very much, me stationmast<u calls him "your lordship." This young man finds her a third-class railway coirtjjartnrfent. little knows that she and he will mget W.iJer ntfrc intimate cir- cumstances. CHAPTERS III. and IV.—Ellen goes to London, and visits the Chadwicks Mr*. Chadwick was formerly a maid at Corbyn Court. They make her welcome, and here she accidentally meets Richard Yarley again He discusses her future with the Chadwieks. He meets Lord Norchester in a smart club, who confides his domestic diffi- rulties to him. Richard Varley promises to look after Lady Norchester while her husband is away. She has expressed her wish for a lady companion, and Varley at once thinks of Ellen Millier. CHAPTER V. liHlen returned from th-e journey to Ealing tired and <lepre.«ed. It had been practicaly decided that she would take the two tiny itrif, tconis which e-he had seen. She had put on a pery brave air to deceive Mrs Chadwick whilst the arrangements were ip progress, but in truth her heart sank as she pictured herself alone in l tiny little house in an ugly little street. She dragged herself up to her room, careful to keep back the tears till she was alone; she was tired, but she could not sleep, everything to her looked so grey, so dreary. She was mpted in this moment to try to get into com- munication with some of her father's scattered delations, to put her pride into her pocket and to a3k for help. "Daddy never refused anyone who came to frim in trouble," she said to herself, "surely [ have tht right to expect some consideration irom those whom he helped?" But alwavj against this there arose tho in- mperable difficulty of assimilating her proud ipirit with those to whom she would be illdebt. td moreover her experience with her aunt bad taught her a bitten lesson, therefore, bleak and friendless as the future looked, she must still fight on single handed. Had her father only lived long enough to have set his affaire in order, Ellen's plight would have been very different; but death had been far from his thoughts that day he had riddeD forth so well ind handsome and in sucb good spirits! Whilst she lay trying to frame tom-e kind of definite scheme, Ellen was unconscious that she ur was being discussed. Var!ey had left Lord Norcheste.. early. The young man had changed his plans. After the dinner the thought of music hall or theatre L bad bored him instead he resolved upon hav- ing a spin into the country in his motor, and had tried to induce Varley to accompany him, but the other man had shaken his head. "I have a certain value for my n-eck," he ea;d, "and moreover, if you want me to see about your business, I'll set to work this very night." He bad not taJcen Norchester into his con- fidence, nor bad be said anything about Ellen Milner, beyond the fact that he knew of some one whom he imagined might be able and will- ing to take up the duties required of her, and Could go and stay at Wynche with Lady Nor- ebester, indeed, after they had separated he ,tv,as just a little dubious as to whether he would be doing a wi«e thing for Ellen if he brought this suggested engagement to her notice. Per- haps more from what Chadwick had left unsaid than what had been told. Varley had guessed at what was actually passing with Ellen. She would scarcely have been likely to have stayed with these people in so humble a manner if things had not been very bad with her. He found Mrs. Chadwick more communicative than Chadwick. In fact, Ellen's former maid con- fessed that sht was a good bit bothered. There isn't anything in the world I wouldn't do for Miss Ellen." she said "but then I'm no use. and she is sc set on doing something for herself. She might stay here, but it don't seem right to me that she should be here. I don't believe Sir Patrick he'd be pleaeed at that, sir. But then, again, I don't like letting her go ancl leave us and go somewhere by herself, thoosrh she has just upon settled to do this." "There are nc. relations then," Varley asked. "no one who has a right to look after her?" Mrs. Chadwick told him that it appeared Cnere were no people belonging to Ellen to whom she could M. She's just been living along with an annt cf noel'S, sir, since poor Sir Patrick died: but the had an awful time, and rac away. That's wL" she came here to me." "I have an idea, that I can holp her," Varley «akl. "I should be very much obliged if you will arrange that Mi*s Milner will see me if fo.esib'e io-morrow. I am afraid it will have lo b" early." "Oh Miss Ellen she's always up vrey early. Sir; slip's beer going out for a walk before breakfast these last few mornings. Yes, sir. you are welcome to have our sitting room with plec.yriire, and I'll tell Miss Ellen. I'm sure," nr.id MR?. Chadwick, earnestly, "both mc and Chadwick would be awfully glad if there was

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The Road to Love