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POET'S CORNER.

The Road to Love

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PASSING OF OATMEAL.

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FUN AND FANCY.

LUNG DISEASES,

FOR THE YOUNG FOLKS,

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,= FOR MATRON AND MAIO 6HE IS NOT LOVED. Men do not fall in love with sarcastic girls. At first they may be attracted, not because they feel any distinct admiration, but the girl who is quiak-wit-ted usually does attract, and at first her caustic remarks may make them laugh. That she has a superior wit and is much ad- mired and sought out the sarcastic girl is con- vinced of, and she doesn't seem to notice that it is always a fresh crowd around her, and that she has no power to hold those who on first know- ing her may have been one of her most enthu- siastic admirers. When she feels herself being left alone her re- marks get still more acid, and more often than not she becomes an acrimonious old maid. Men do not fall in love with her, simply be- cause they are afraid of that caustic wit of hers. There is always the uncomfortable feeling in their minds while laughing at the so-called witty things that she says about others, that she talks in the same way about them when thdlr backs are turned. Brightness and a sense of humour are admi- rable in their way, but when a girl employs the latter in an endeavour to say funny things at another person's expense, she is running the risk of making herself unpopular. TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING. Be neat, but not too all-powerful neat. Better a dusty room than a spotless one gain- ed by nagging. Some women's sole idea of a home is a place where every corner may be inspected at any I moment by her dearest foe. t "Persnicketty" is an old-fashioned expres- sion of what a woman should not be if she wants her husband to be happy. Cleanliness may be akin to godliness, but it is difficult to make the victims of a perniciously clean housewife see it in that light. On the other hand, do not be sloppy No woman need be a fright because she does her own work. Likewise a slovenly house is not one where the father and children delight to linger. SOMEHOW THEY DG. It is a wonder that children ever do grow I up to be good-looking, healthy men and wo- men, when one thinks of all the things they do consciously or unconsciously to hurt them- selves. Nor can a mother be always nagging at them; her influence must be, for the most part, by suggestion. Before a child is old enough to have any personal vanity it is somewhat difficult to make it understand that facial contortions will cause bitter sorrow in after years, or that parties during the week not only injure the health, but retard studies, that wet feet and sitting in draughts often cause future suffering from rheumatism or a weak chest I THE JOINT PURSE. Every man and every woman has his or her own little idiosyncrasies, and the newly-mar- ried are apt < to jar on one another and irritate one another. It takes a great deal of lovr, to put up with peculiarities. There are marriages that promise to be hap- py, but which become failures because of some small peculiarities. One husband will be lazy about shaving, and his stubby face may fill his fastidious little wife with disgust which tuns to dislike. But the rocks on which many matrimouial barges are wrecked is that of money. If there is constant friction about money matters there can be no happiness. If the wife has to beg for every penny and the husband constantly grumbles about the expenditure, then marriage may be counted a failure. There is only one way of avoiding this diffi- culty, and that is to settle all monoy ques- tions at the first go off. Let the husband and wife get pencil and paper and sit down one evening and go over their income carefully. Allow so much for rent, so much for lighting and heating, so much for clothes, so much for travelling, insurance, charity, and so on, leav- ing a generous margin for unexpected ex- penses. The secret of so much daily comfort and happiness lies in system. Have tho money apportioned, and stick to the arrangement. Make your wants suit your purse, and do not attempt to satisfy all desires regardless of tho family ex- chequer FASHION FANCIES. Coloured embroidery enters into much of the now lingerie neckwear. For slim-throated wearers some novel neck- pieces show little bows arranged at the top of the stock. Some indescribably soft rose shades touched with brown arc relieved in millinery by violet tones. Gay little teacoats to slip over light-coloured I frocks are of all-over lace. t Gun metal tissue is shot with nearly every I colour, and used as effective trimming. Dull toned gowns are set off with elaborate flower-bedecked hats. Linens are either heavy almost like Russian crash, or they are thin and fine. Crush ribbon and satin folds are to take the place of high ruchings. Among tho fads of the moment is tho one of lacing the sleevo all the way up on the out- side of the arm. Embroidery in cross-stitch and in colourings seen upon some of the smartest new modols in linen and pique. Coloured fourlads with a black dot in place of a white one are seen in Paris. Coloured net over silver or gold net forms sleeves and guimpes in some new models. Delightful one-piece frocks are in washing silks with guimpes and sleeves showing em- broidery. The one colour fancy necessitates dyeing to I the shade of the dress material all Laco and other trimmings. The up-to-date cry is, "When in doubt as to trimming try jet." Where two immense roses appear on the same ( hat they are unusually flat in shape. HINTS FOR THE HOME. Whiting or ammonia in the water is preferable to 6oap for cleaning windows or paint. J Moisture is the greatest enemy of the piano, and it cannot be too carefully guarded against. When boiling eggs put on the lid of the sauce- pan, and the eggs will have a much finer flavour. When blowing out a candle hold it above you and blow. If this be dono the wick will not smoulder. If too much blueing is put in the water in which clothes are rinsed, add a little household ammonia. Brushes that have been used for paint can be cleansed with turpentine, and spirits of wine will remove varnish. When anything is made too salty it can be counteracted by using a tablespoonful of vine- gar and one of sugar A small lump of yellow soap or a few soap shavingj placed in a mouse hole will prevent the mouse from reappearing Never fill a lamp quito full. or when ft is brought into a warm room the expansion of the oil will. cause it to overflow. Finger marks on doors should be rubbed with a cloth wrung out of hot water and dipped in whiting. Rinse and dry thoroughly, rubbing until the polish is restored. Soda used in the laundry should be dissolved before the garments to be washed arc placed in the tub. Yellow stains, which soon form holes, are caused by soda touching wet linen. Keep the roots of the celery plant Dry, and grate them and mix the powder with one-third as much salt. Keep in a bottle, well corked. It is delicious in soups, gravios, hashes, etc. Saucepans should be kept clean on the out- side as well as inside. To prevent the'smoke from sticking rub the outside of c. new saucc- pan with fat before placing it on the stovo. Wash with hot water and soda. The shine that shows a serge skirt, or jacket to be no longer new can easily bo removed by sponging the garment with blueing water, such as is used to launder clothes. While still damp. press the part under a thin cloth. If grease be spilled on the hearth do not wash it. Take up as much as you can by rubbing it with an old newspaper, and then rub the mark over well with a piece of dry hearthstone. Brush off the hearthstone, and, if necessary, re- peat the process. 'LINBRKD COMPOUND' for Coughs and Colds. Re- lieves Asthma and difficult breathing. 9id., l/lj.

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The Road to Love