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--------.---. HONOURING COL.…

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. Merthyr Bankruptcy Court.

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I Merthyr Manslaughter Case.II

Merlhyr Constable Acquitted.

----------MARRIED LADIES.

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--------.---. HONOURING COL.…

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'_q finding the money was discussed, the Colonel said, "Now, gentlemen, let us have faith. Let us go OU, and it will be all right in the end." And so it was (applause). They ail knew the splendid results (re- newed applause). The school was suco?st- fu'iy est<Lbli.Ùed. and thousands of boys and girls had passed through it, and derived last- in advantage from the education which they reoaived there (applause). From the beginning. Cel. Lewis had been one of tho most generous subscribers to prizes as well as scholarships; he had given hundreds of pounds to that "chool abne, but the fact was not known to everybody. He had also given his valuable time and ripe experience to the work of the management of the school. and ho ventured to say there was no institution in the town which was more efficiently or economically managed than the County School. That höol would shortly pass into the hands of the Town CouaciL, He .{the ■ Chairman) licpcd,' and he was sure he w?;; ,>;e echoing the sentimaaVs of all of them; th?> £ omft\ moar. wott'd^ be d^vved whereby, the seijvicas of (Jot. Lewis for: th/« benefit,. of higher cdncaticn 'cheers). Col. r."W; had led a very strenuous lifo. Th-sy could not men. tion one good object which had not received h's warmest and mcr-t generous support. — The Chairman was applauded as he expressed tho fervent hope that Col. Lewis vyould be with them for many years, as hi life had heef] an inspiration to his fellow-townsmen and hi? hi,,}. ic'eals, his exanrp'es, loyalty, and devction to public welfare had s'ngled him out a- a man deserving of the highest honour, and his narho would 00 remembered for many generations or Merthyr men. He honid the gallant Colonel would live long to serve the interests of his town and country (applause). HIGH SENSE OF DUTY. Sir W T. Lewis, Bart, in presenting the bust to Col. Lewis, said he attended the meeting with very great pleasure to join them in show- ing- his admiration for his old friend and kins- man (applause). Col. Lewis, from his (the speaker's) observations of his doings for nearly sixty years had certainly from a, very early period of his life not only conceived a very high sense of duty, but had followed it od on every occasion, publicly and privately, to his (Sir Wil- liam's) own intimate knowledge. He had well earned and maintained the goodwill and admir- ation of who had it:o pleasure of knowing him. So that it was not simply a figure of speech to say that he specially deserved there cognition tbey were offering him thai. eYeI\in¡, Cel. Lewis joined the 12th Glamorgan liiiie Volunteers as a private on the 10th January, 1861, and was promoted to bo Corporal in less than two years. Then having to reside in Londen to qualify for his profession he joined the Lon- don Rifle Brigade in 1865. Upon his return to Merthyr he rejoined his old Corps, and devoted himself so thoroughly to his duties as a Volunteer that he earned his promotion very rapidly by successive step; serving as Ser- geant, Ensrrn, Lieu'enant, Captain, Major, and Lieut-Colonel, and in 21 years he attained the rank of honorary Colonel of the 3rd V.B. Welsh Regiment. In 1902 he became Col.-Command- ant, having served as Lieut.-Colonel for 22 years, during which time ho took pari in nu- merous reviews, including the Jubilee Review before Queen Victoria at Aldershot, in 1807. He al-x) commanded his Battalion on various other occasions before Kin"- Edward and the Prince of Wales, a.nd when he retired in 1907 he wa.s gi-anted the permanent rank of Colon"! with a lonsr service -medal (applause). Colonel Lewis enjoyed the good fortune of being most loyally supported by an excellent staff of offi- cers, who vied wIth him inenconra:,ing- every member of the force to a high standard of dis- cipline and efficiency (applause), and he suc- ceeded in in "using all of them with such a spirit of esprit de corps that his Battalion wos the nride cf South Wales, a.nd it was also among the largest and most efficient Bartn.lions in the United Kingdom. Concurrent wi h these splend'd services as a -Volunteer, Colonel Lewis also de- voted Vis time and money most generously to further everything having for its object the ad, vancement of his native town and fellow citi- zens, irrespective of creed or sect 'applause). He served as High Constable of Merthyr, he took a most active part in the establishment of the Cha/nber of Trade, in bringing about iIn. proved railway facilities, he substantially .s. sisted in the establishment of the Merthyr Gen- eral Hosp'ta.l, through him the Countv School was c-c • ,> b! shed he advocated persistently over and over again the incorpoia ion of Merthyr, and he 00 operated in many other movements too numerous or him Sir WiTinm) to d^'ail to them that night. Co'one] T.ewis was always on the alert to take part in any movement having for its object tho benefit of his townsmen cheers). In all matters, creat and small, with •■•hich Colonel Iswis had i(1:] ifnd himself he most enthusiastically and thoroughly fulfilled his duty, a.nd he as a most 'oyaJ and true citi- aen, whose exemplary life was a fine example or ireoorations of Merthyr hoys to follow (loud (applause) "Mv dear David," said Sir William, in conclusion, "through the kindness of your many friends in Merthyr a.nd Aberdare, I am honoured with the pleasing duty of asking your acceptance of your bust (cheers), which your numerous friends in both towns offer you as p, mark of their admiration and appreciation of your public and private work during the mrny years rou have so heartily and generously de- voted yourself to the best interests of your fel- low countrymen." Sir William, on behalf of the subscribers, also expressed the hope that Colonel Lewis, &nd the Misses Lewis, would livo long- to enjoy this wcll-esrned recognition, and es- pecially the bust which was the work of that eminent Wehb artist, Mr. W. Goscombe John, A.R.A. nJud applause). FOUGHT THE RAILWAY COMPANIES. Mr. J. PlGWS then presented the silver ser- vioB; and said it was a very pleasant duty to have to hand over c-uch a present to his old friond, the Colonel (applause), it was said in the address that the Colonel was one of the founders of the Chamber of Trade. lie- (Mr. Plows) was also one of the founders, and could t hers fore speak of the Colonel's energy, aud the mode in which he did his work as secre- tary at that early period. Colonel Lewis wa: the chiof mover in getting through bookings from Merthyr to anywhere, a.nd also in getting a through railway connection at Cardiff. They approached the Railway Commissioners, and obtained an order compelling the T.V.R. and the G.W.R. to make the connection at Card;ii which the public now enjoyed. Formerly pas- sengers had to re-bcok at Cardiff if they want ed to go further on. One day some of the en terprising members of the Chamber, including the Colonel, It-oked for tickets for Newport at the Taff Station, which were refused. But they managed to board a brain and landed at Newport without tickets. They were detain- ed in the station for a time they to be locked up. if necessary; and they had to appear before the inspector (laughter). But they suc- ceeded in their object, and from that and through the Chamber of Trade, people were now able to book to anywhere they liked (ap- plause). He agreed with all the good that hid b?en said of Co'onel Lewis. They were indebt cd to him for the work ho had done and the interest he had taken in all that concerned the welfare of the town. He had always been vigorous and energetic, and never allowed a matter to rost which he thought was for the benefit of tbe town until he brought it to a sue. csisful is-me. When the presentation move- ment was started it was agresd that there should be no solicitation for subscriptions, and in four months they had sufficient money to get the pedestal and bust. the silver piece, and the albm11. It 5howed how well th C0lon1 wa- aiteemed, and they all hoped he would continue in their midst to further enjoy the love and confidence of the people (applause). Mrs. Biddie then presented the album to the Colonel. She referral to the Colonel's devo- tion to Volunteering, and urged the women of Merthyr to impress upon their husbands and sweethearts the importance of joining the Terri torial Forces. She felt would please the Colonel more than anything. M'ss Annie Ree-5. who possesses a sweet, re- fined voice, sang "There's a land," after which short addresses were deliverod by several known gentlemen. SACRIFICED TIME AND MONEY. Colonel A. P. James said that Colonel Lewis always held that the Volunteer force should I form an integral part of the hmy for the de- fence of our shores, and that every young fel- low should eerve in the forc&. The Colonel sac- rificed his time and money in making known his opinion and cnccuraging Volunteerism, and one day he heard a professional friend say to uhe Colonel in the train, "What a. lot of time you waoto over this thing." Who would now get up and say that a. man serving in the Terri- torial Force was wasting his timo? (applause). Col. Lewis stuck to the work; and the whole country had now decreed that his contention was right, and the Territorial Army would, ho beheved, be a great tuccess. Ho (Col James) 3crycd under Co!. Lewis for thirty years; ha would Ic.vo to serve under liim again: and though ho was not connected with the Terri- torials. they all knew that the Colonel was with them [0 faet and ill spirit (applause). I Mr. W. L. Dajiiel said he had knowu Col. Lewis for 47 years, and the more he knew him the better he liked him. He had never known hi- temper rulHed; he had set a good example, and had shown how a good life should be led (applause). The young men of the town looked up to the Colonel as one who could be followed in every good work—and that was testimony for a soldier, a lawyer, and a citizen; he was a citizen of noble aspiration (applause). Mr. A. P. Jones. ox-High Constable of Aber- dare, on behalf of tho Aberdare Committee, spoke of the love and affection the people of Aberdare had for Cel. Lewis. It was, there- fore, a great pleasure for them to take part in this function. Col. Lewis was a typical patriot and gentleman—(applause)—so patriotic that if it were possible, he would vote for a dozen Dreadnoughts \laughter and cheers). He was kind and courteous to all classes of the com- munity, and he joined in tho fervent hope that the Colonel would lIve for many years to enjoy the gifts (applause). Colonel Thomas Phillips (Aberdare) <aid he had been associated with Col. Lewis in many capacities for the list half century. He remem- bered the day when the Colonel was a shy young man, he was an articled clerk with the late Mr. Frank James. At that time, he Philiip-) was a junior clerk in the same office, and they remained at. the same desk for several years until tho Colonel was called sway to London to undergo his final law exar/iina- lion. Thev formed a crrat fri vnd-hip, amI fm fifty years that friendship had never been E'.KUT'-mI liy any unpleasantness (applause). When the ilat.a life, ¥.£ Liit, CsljMw! tpl -r7-I' go into court, ho was so s-hy that ho would rather stick to the books, wills, and other docu- ments. At that time they did not think that tho Colonel would become such a popular and distinguished citizen, or a zealous and capable commander of one of the largest Volunteer battalions in tho country (applause) He (Col. Phillips) was delighted with the bust, for the artist' had caught the Colonel's kind, genial, and dignified expression, which was so charac- teristic cf him (applause). "1 am glad," face- tiously remarked the speaker, "that the sculp- tor never saw the Colonel in front of his bat- tar on when something went wrong—when some- body had blundered. His rebukes and censure were severe, and 'expressed in unmistakable terms" (laughter). In conclusion. Col. Phillips said that their honoured guest was thorough in everything he attempted, in everything he isaid, and in everything ho did (applause). FRIEND OF THOSE IN TROUBLE. i .Major E- .T. James endorsed every- wo.rd spok en ab;ou,t-Cal. Le?!?is, espeoiai-ly jis to.j-feis gener-. oSiiy -and- kindness. anyone was in"-trouble, the Colonel was always the ficst to help a man or woman out of it (applause) Col. J. J. Jones ( Col. Lewis's partner) I s3.:d he would like to add his testinfony to the noble character of the Colonel. Ho endorsed every word seid about his public services to his country and town. He (Col. Jones) had been a partner with Col. Lewis, and had Veen intimate with him for the last forty years, and he claimed to know him better than anyone except the immediate members of his family. He knew the immense amount of labour, "acrifice, and pecuniary loss which those serv'ces had entailed upon the Colonel But it was not only in public service that his character shone out with lustre, but also in his private capacity and life, in his conduct towards his intimate fnend-, and all with whom became into con- tad. lie and the Colonel were boys nnd pJay- mates together, and those characteristics were prominent, in him thpn. and as years went by. they became intensified. During the forty years their partnership had existed, they not only had never had a quarrel but never had a cross word (applause). He attributed that happy result in a great measure to those virtues which he had mentioned (app1,use). Mr. Harry Thomas; sang, "I hear you calling ma." "DONE MY DUTY." ol. Lewis, upon rising to reply, was received with loud and prolonged cheering. The audi- ence rose and gave three hearty cheers for the gallant Colonel, who seemed qune overcome by I trie ovation. "I cannot," he soid, "tell you that this is the happiest moment of my life, but I can tell you that it is the proudest (cheers) I told the secretary that probably by the time I had to address you I should not know myself, and that has come to pass. All that has been said of me has made me think that Colonel Lewis is anoriier men than the man I know him to be. I cannot express to you my thanks. But f can say this: have done my duty in the past, and you acknowledge it to night. I can- not thank you sufficiently, but I can promise you that in the years that are yet to come I will do my duty still better (loud applause). It i3 sixteen years ago• that my follow V ojunteers placed upon the wall of the Drill Hall that „u:e picture of myself to mark their npprepiation of my services, and when I received the picture I told them I trusted they would never have to turn its face to the wall (applause). You have presented me with this beautiful bust of myself. 1 trust you will never have to veil it for any causa I anav give (applause). Ail the little in- cidents cf my life hive been brought before me. something like what passes through the mind of a, drowning man—all the events that have occur- red during my life have been brought viyilly befcre me by the kind expressions of friends who have como here at great inconvenience and from long distances, to show :ppreciation for the little I have done in the past. I have not courted popularity. I have not jisked you to reward me in any way, and when the ques- tion of this giand presentation came be lore me t I at once said, "I will have none of it, as it looks like payment for services I have done." I have only done what my kinsman, Sir Wil- liam, has done in his long and useful life. "Do your duty, come 'what may," is a motto which Sir William Lewis has worked upon all his life, and it behoves every man and womllIlto carry it out (cheers), "1 cannot touch on the many things mentioned hero to-night. I know your hearts have -one out towards me, and my !¡ea,rt has pone out towards you (applause). I appreci- ate what you have done and nil the presents to such a high degree thnt I cannot find words 'o express rnv thanks. These noble sifts be landed down to those who come after me, and will be looked upon :1 mr::111melits o" what you 'bought of me, and the presents will always be nn inspiration to them to do what I have done their duty (cheers). Colonel Lewis, ad- dressing the yenger portion of the assembly, urged them, whatever position they were in, to do their duty well. and not "et "beyond their tether." He would liko the bust to be placed somewhere in the town, because it was presented to him for what he had done as a. citizen, and he would, therefore, like the Cor- poration to accept it, not as an emblem cf a good citizen, but as a work of art. The bust was a work of art which any town would be proud to receive. In conclusion the Colonel again thanked the subscribers most warmly, The Chairman informally accepted bust on bshalf of the Corporation, and said it would be plaocd either in the Town Hail or in the mu- seum and art gallery to come (applause). On the motion of Mr. Wm. Griffiths, seconded by Coun. F. S. Simons, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the chairman and all the offi- cers of the Committee, and Dr. Biddle, in replying, said that every penny of the mcney had been subscribed voluntarily. The band of the Merthyr Territorials played several selections during the evening, and at the close Miss Annie Rees sang "God save the King," the audience joining in the refrair. The accompanist was Mr. E. T. Davies, F.R.O. The following description of silver has been furnished by the "Goldsmiths' and Silversmiths' Company, by whom it was supplied :—Solid sil- ver gilt dessert service after Paul Lamerie. con- sisting of large double centre epergne on sil- vsr-naounted carved wood plinth, two side dishes, two smaller dishes, and two bon-bon dishes, with silver gilt plate and inscription engraved, in J'>OJi.ohed mahogany case. The inscription on th? plate was as follows:— "Presented to Colonel D"vid Rees Lewis, V.D., J.P. together with a. marble bust (by W. Gos- combe John. and an album address, by his numerous friends and admirers, on the occa- sion of his retirement from the command of the 3rd Vol. Batt. Regiment after 47 years' service, and in recognition of his generous and splendid work as a townsman.—Nov., 1908." COLONEL LEWIS: AN APPRECIATION. Long live our gallant Coone1- He bears an honour'd name: The passing years brought laurels To crown hi- life with fame; Hurrah for Colonel Lewis! The echo shouts "Well done!" The good old town of Merthyr Is proud of such a son. Long live the people's favourite, True comrade in a fight: A guide and wise adviser In battles for the right; A brave and trusted leader. In truth a dauntless knight; A Briton and a soldier We honour here to-night. Long livo the fr'end of children. Thanks to his helping hand, Within the town and district Their knowledge do expand. As forward march the ages, Through periods far away, His influence, as roses, Will blossom every day. When Merthyr lifts her makers, As pictures on a wall, To gaze in admiration Upon their faces all, To him she'll point her fing&T, Her eye on him will rest; Kind thoughts of Colonel Lewis Will linger in her breast. Merthyr. E. CTNOG PBlcÈ. 'LRN'FHKD COMPOUND' for Coughs and Colds. Re- lieves Asthma and difficult breathing. 9!d., 1AJ.