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JUVENILE CONCERT BY THE HAFJD…

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JUVENILE CONCERT BY THE HAFJD SCHOOL CHILDREN. It never rains but pours" is very adaptable to the present custom in regard to Children's Con- certs. It is not easy in these days when so many schools undertake the extraneous task of prepar- ing school entertainments to strike out a new path. However, Mr Evans and his colleagues, Mrs Gibbon and Mr Harris (the Musical Director on the occasion), are to be congratulated upon intro- ducing novelties even into these Juvenile Enter- tainments. Every item of the programme, and every number of the sweetly pretty cantata, en- titled "Holiday," bespoke the most careful and successful training. The young operatics went through their parts in a way which reminded one of old stagers. Undoubtedly, the plasticity of the youthful mind was strikingly verified in the re- sult of this concert. They also impressed one with more than mere marionette performers. The way these little girls and boys absorbed them- selves in the role they played shown that the training had been of the most intelligent kind. Take the sword exercise as an illustration. The precision and execution was splendid, and worthy of ithe Lancers and the Regulars." It was pretty, and the simultaneity of the exercise showed that at Hafod things are not be done in a slip- shod slovenly fashion. Every movement re- flected thoroughness and discipline. The Re- citation of the "Charge of the Light Brigade" as the sequence of the Sword Drill Performance was done in graphic style. We expected great things in this department, for we have remimiscences of sjme telling performances by Mr Evans in the days gone by in Recitation Competitions on many an eisteddfod platform. The Conductor of ¡ the choir was Mr Harris, the senior assistant, and the cantata opens with a dashing chorus beginn- t ing with the words of We are a group of Merry Children." Then three fairies enter with the happy names of Content, Fun, and Goodwill. Fair Content was Miss Jane Rees, Miss Frizzie Phillips was Fairy Fun, while Fairy Goodwill was represented by Miss Mary Morgan. It is needless to remind our readers that Content, Fun, and Goodwill was the prevailing feeling after the young ladies had gone through their parts. Vocally, they were excellent types of contralto voices. Fairy Goodwill introduces A Merry little Man," and the young gent appears on the soene, and sings away right cheerily. The young man's name was Evan Daniel, and when he had finished his merry little ditty we exclaimed with the audience very well done, Evan. The best chorus leads us to the Village Green. In fancy we went to the Village Green of our young days, but to realise a Village Green in this Rhondda of ours is a stretch of the imagination of some difficulty. However, the joyous strains of the youthful band were a reality. The words We'll run and we'll jump with our spirits set free, We'll dance and we'll sing in the chorus and glee." Were characteristically sung. Then Miss Mary May Morris, as the Flower Girl, came on the scene. It was sweetly pretty. She had all the flowers, and she sang the merits of each with equal impartiality-the Lilies, Violets, Roses, &c. Then came the Robin Hood, who for the occasion claimed the position of a great man on the bow and arrow-Tommy Davies by name, and I am archer by pursuit. It was refreshing in these days of powder and dynamite to hear the charms of archery, and Tommy did it well in song, verse, and action. The next number was strangely illustrative of child-life. Evidently in the Play- ground World they are Radicals and Reformers. Conservatism does not flourish in the land of games, and the title of the next chorus forcibly intruded this idea on our mind—here it is- "Then come and have another game." This was followed by some real life in the introduction of genuine see-saw. A boy and a girl See sawed," and the choir sang to the motion. Mr Harris must have exercised extreme care on this per- formance, the tempo of the chorus, guided by this n wel metronome, was very pleasing. Positively the effect of the combination was rejuvenating to the seniors present. Miss Fanny Jones, as Fish Lassie, with her haddies for sale, and the Sea Captain Bold and Free, by Johnny Thomas, was in rare briny style. The young lady had a clinking voice, and Johnny did the swagger of the Jolly Tar in good form. The old Woman who lived in a shoe'' could hot resist the attraction of the Village Green Festivities. Miss Mary Elizabeth Jones, judging from performance, must at least be on the verge of the century. She understood her difficult part thoroughly, and gave every symptom of movements applicable to the sere and yellow leaf period of life. Tom Pickle- tooth was next hailed by the chorus of girls. Tom was an overgrown lad, and much given to dainties, hence Pickletooth. Tom gloried in Jollypops and the toothsome to hin was irresistible temptation. However, Daniel Rees did the Tom Pickletooth admirably. Then came the "Little servant Maid" to the Green. Miss Fanny Jones and her Rub and Scrub was a great hit. The scene again (or we should say the game) is changed. Another proof of my contention that youth is "hadical." Tired of see-saw, now take to the exhilarating exercise of skipping. Then Miss Cath. Evans comes with fruit. As a fruit girl she was a great success. In response to her puffing up of the lip-smacking fruit, the children sing as chorus "We have pennies." The "news boy," Mr Morgan Emmanuel, was amusing. His bag 9 11 was full, and the Pontypridd and Rhondda Chronicle was in great demand. The cantata concluded with a chorus, with the usual Tra la la." The vocal performance throughout was in good form-intonation, precision, and attack, also articulation and spirit were admirably blended. Mr Harris deserves every encourage- ment for the work he has done. Mrs Gibbon must also be recognised for her deep interest. The brightness and intelligence of the girls show that in other subjects of school work they were well disciplined and taught. Mrs Evans and the infants were valuable contributors to this pleasant entertainment. The end in view will be realised by Mr Evans and his colleagues. To one and all, from the headmaster to the humblest member of the staff, the entire result must afford the greatest satisfaction. Originally the entertainment was only intended to go on for two nights, but the unusual patronage of a gratified locality claimed the extension of the series to a third night. The instrumental part was undertaken by expert per- formers. Mr Morgan Phillips at the piano, Mr Evan Thomas at the harmonium, and Mr W. W. Phillips with his violin, were in perfect accord with the high character of the performance vocally. Also, "last but not least" were the merits of Mr David Phillips as basso. The chair was taken on the several nights by the school board msmbers. On Thursday eveni ng, Mr W. White Phillips; Friday, Mr H. Abraham and Mr ldris Williams on Saturday. Each and all of these worthy gentlemen filled the parts with success. We are glad to find that in their board capacity they identify themselves with this extraneous department of the work. The more our members ally themselves with the success of the schools the greater encouragement they afford the teachers, and the clearer conception they must have of the duty of the office of their scholastic employees. This is a grand work on the part of the teachers, and should elicit acknowledgment aud sympathy from those public men who seek the amelioration of the masses by the education of the children.

MR BEVAN AND THE FERNDALE…

Pontypridd Police Court.

TALK IS THE TRAIN.

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. Y GOLOFN GYMREIG.

BWRDD YR UNDEB IFORAIDD.

CAN fAT A .. JOSEPH A'l FRODYR."

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FOOTBALL. --

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RHONDDA JOTTINGS. .-

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|CORRESPONDENCE.

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CUTTIXGS FROM LOOKS.

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