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IMUSICAL & CANTATA PERFORMANCE…

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I MUSICAL & CANTATA PERFORMANCE AT PONTYPRIDD. SUCCESSFUL ENTERTAINMENT AT HOWARD'S HALL. On Thursday evening, the 26th ultimo, a crowded and respectable company was present at Howard's Hall, Pontypridd, to patronise an entertainment which was given for the purpose of forming the nucleus of a fund for the erection of a place of worship in connection with the Temple Baptist Church at present worshipping at the Masonic Hall. The proceedings in every respect were attended with a success which was as cbeeiing to the good purpose in view as it was gratifying and encourage ing to the promoters. The chair on the occasion WhS occupied by Mr Major Hague, M.E., manager of the Maritime Colliery, who filled the position in a thoroughly proficient manner. His opening remarks were bri, f, but pointed and effective, and were deservedly cheered. The Chairman had great pleasure in being present that evening, and seeing such large andience come together to lend a helping hand to such a good cause. lie believed that the concert and cantata had been got up for a most deserving purpose, the proceeds being for the benefit of the budding fund of Temple Chapel. Tbue were some friends present that evening who had formed tnemselves into a society called the Temple Baptist Church, and were very anxious to build a new chapel and Sunday school, which he thought would be a great boon to the district in which they proposed building the same; that was in Albert-road or Llantrisant-road. At present they used the Masonic Hall, and at the Sunday school thereat the children were taught to read the Bible and to keep the Sabbath day holy, and he thought there was a great deal of truth i. the old saying— "A Sabbath well spent I-Brin-,a a week of content, "And health for the toil cf to-morrow. "But a.Sabbath profane, "Whatever may gain, "Is certain for ruin and sorrow." He was sure they would all agree with him that the building committee were deserving of success. (Applause.) There wns not much work for a chairman of such a meeting, but to look snnny, speak funny, and give plenty of money. (Laughter and renewed cheering.) 1 he first part of the progamme partook the form of a miscellaneous concert, and was gone through in an enjoyabl? manner. After a capital rendering of instrumental music by the Rifle Volunteer Brass Band, under the able leadership of Mr Norton, a song, When the Bloom is on the Rye," was given by Mr Tom Owen, followed by The Last Rose of Summer," by Miss M. W. Thomas. The evergreen local favourite, Llew Llan, then gave The Grave- diggef;" and Master T. T. Jeukins a harp solo. Mr E. Griffiths s;tng "The Pilgrim of Love," and was followed by Miss Thomas, with the beautifully- simple Sweet Violets." We were much pleased with the sweet SiDgiDg of Miss Mills, who, wi^h her brother, Mr J. C. Mills, gave tbe "ABC" duett; the former, with careful training, bids fair to rank amongst the leading amateurs of the towr. Mr Tom Owen sang I don't mean to tell you her name;" and the first part concluded with another liarp solo from Master T. T. Jenkins. During the' interval between the parts the Brass Band afforded another treat with a splendid overture. The second part was devoted to a performance of the beautiful cantata, The White Garland (com- posed by C. G. Allen), and the stage curtain rose on a scene that was really charming and artistic. The representation of the piece was entrusted to about fifty children connected with the Temple Church and others, and the youthful performers had been trained to a marked degree of perfection by Mr D. Williamn (Llew Mabon), who fully deserved the fluttering expression of approval repeatedly bestowed upon him by the audience. The get tJP" of the children was also singularly pleasing, neatness of appearance blending most harmoniously with the richness of effect produced. The at-gumett set forth in the cantata is as follows The occaeion is a scholars' festival, and the chil dren, assembled in a rural spot for a picnic, are gathered round their Qneen. They circle playfully abcut her, singing the choruses "Happy hearts,' and "Hail to our Queen." The Queen then an. nounces that she will bestow wreaths of laurels and flowers upon the heads of the best children. The Punctual scholar is first invested, and some amusement is caused by the appearance cf the Tardy scholar, who sings a song. The Persevering scholar is next crowned, and greeted by the chorus. The Punctual and Persevering scholar then sing a duett. The entrnncs of the Quarrelsome scholar causes a diversion. He is rebuked, in a song, by a little gitf- The Generous scholar next advances, andi'S frowned, and the Selfish scholar is chided. The party all sing a song, and go off for a picnic, leaving behind the Quarrelsome, S-lnsb. and Tardy ech( lars, who have a conversation. They end by expressing their sorrow to the Queen, who forgives them, and takes them back. A united chorus follows, and the cantata ends with a hymn. In this order the performance was gone through with- out a single hitch, and frequent and hearty was the applause which greeted the little ones as they combined so successfully to give a faithful render- ing of the piece. The cantata opened with the solo "Yourg hearts gaily beating," nicely sung by the Queen (Miss S. Thomas), and the children took up the chorus "Happy hearts" with a piquancy of effect which at once stamped the enjoyableness of the performance on the minds of those present The Queen having greeted the children with a hearty welcome, the chorus "Hail to our beautiful Qaeen" was sung with a loyalty of spirit which was most striking. "Her Majesty" again sang a solo, "I come, your festive queen and the children followed with the chorus. "She comes." Punctual scholar then gracefully enters, and ad'dresses the Queen upon the virtues of her punctuality. The Queen replica in commendation of her punctual habits, and invests her with a "sweet garland fresh from Nature's bowers," a token of esteem and true regard. The Qaeen and children follow with the greeting song, Wear thy croWn of lilies white," "Child of the early morn," "Waking when its beams of light I "Beautiful fields adorn." The Tardy scholar {Master Arthur Roberts) then joggles into view with all the tardiness of his nature, and having been addressed in suitable terms of admonition by the Queen, he tries to ex- plain away the lateness of his arrival and his un- tidy appearance. The Queen again reprimands the lad, who complies with her request to sing a song, and gives in an exceedingly humorous and realistic manner the "Tardy Scholar's Song," opening with— "I am scolded every day, "How it is I cannot say, "When I reach the schoolyard gate, "Someone tells me lam late," And when subsequently he was taunted by the children he began to sob, and pathetically retorted thus- "That is just the way, you see, "All are making fun of me, "Laughing at my tangled hair; "No one Hkes me, I declare." The next to enter is Perseverance, and in res- ponse to her remarks the Queen compliments her upon her habits of perseverance, and places upon her brow, by way of reward, a wreath of laurels. The character of Perseverance was well sustained by Miss E. A. Davies. The chorus "Now we greet yoa, sister dear," was given by the children, whose I charming voices had a thrilling effect. Panctuality aiyi Perseverance DDC "In the pleasant path of doty," and then is heard the rough unoouthed footsteps of the Quarrelsome Scholar, whose ap pearance on the stage presented a veritable speci- men of the aad and sorry disciples of the Sullivan school. With clothes tattered and torn, and face disfigured, Quatrelfeome (Blaster 8. Thomas) acknowledges his nataral weakness, and threatens violenoe upon thoee who offend him. The Qaeen toplim with sharp reproof of the lad for his pigOistia proelititise, tad wdm bin OR the few. Miss Harriet Jenkins sang "Naughty boy" with go-.>d judgment and pr- cisi n. The next to ':nter w--I.'e tt¡¡-eB little fetii.1 s--h who iutroo'uoeci the Oenert.us scholar (M. n, :>av>ea). and she- in turn was crowned by trie Qn.-m with a gat laud of pure white blossoms, '•« a-oi-rna of a meek and quiet spirit that liv, s not tV :■ s^if but for others." "How sweet and lovely is h. fao^" was sana; as a chorus, during the r. r, -r na of which Seifish scholar (Master J. Kn.vlau-'t e-il^r3. The scholars ire wis<<fnl for »•> i.cn- v to be shown towards the lad, and expi>s-< ■» hop* that he wi 1 taKe a les- ous fr n t scholar last crow ;ed bt-for-' bfin>i allowed to ua> icipste in their sports. Th« Qneen l^'buk^d b y f -r his selfishness, and oi<i» red i-im »»-ac. A then adjourned to the f-«sr, and as the chtidri- ..r-i-i.-d off t be stage two by two the seen- w "pry pleasing one. Before le vtn tr, howevf*- th- 4,tt,g the bird carol 'How mfr.y the life ,.f a bir-l mu.-t bR," I be stage during ;hi- interval was w.-npied by the three refractory scholars, ht:d After II mu ual conversation, they agree t,, amnd their co duct, and ask the Queen for' forgiveness. U,u the return of th,, party, the Qaatr> l.-i"me scholar implored roy"l mercy on b ii If < f tim elf and companions, wnich at fengtn was extended t > them, and the boys wre cheerfully g eeted by or,tire company of children. who united in the chorus of "Gathered onoe more, h«ppy ag-in. By this t me the Queen discovered fc at ti P, shadows of the evenirg wer* gradually cios nz in up r: the haps.y picnic scene, and she invited t:;e little oi-es 10 j .in her in offering thanks to Hisn w jo is tMe soa-ce of all joy for the day of mirth and innocent delight they had spent. The cantat10 was brought to an agreeable close by singing ''Now to the L-.ird, whose tender love." All the characters we-re singularly faultless in the execution of their parts, the Queen and Tardy scholar being particularly notiot-aoie in this respect. Besides tne characters named there were Maids of Honour (Miss James and Miss Mor- uans), and Life Guards (alastdis G. J. Mayb'-rry, AL Williams, Dan Wiiih-.ms, E. T. L-?ysnon, LI. Thomax, and B. Roberts) Mr Mnyberry Thomas was a most proficient accompanist,— N t. the couelu- siou of the program mo, tha lie v. B Da.ies, in tujgestiog a vote of thanks to the oh-urman, paid ma,n was mado to lasgh as w°ll as to ci y. Laogh- lng was as much his nature as crying. He thanked them all very much for their support that ev^aiovr, and felt sure that they had thoraighlv enjoyed themselves. He was gl=d to inform them ttias a d «y or two previously he received a cheque from Mr A. Thon»af, M P., fcr £ 25 towards the building fund of the proposed Temple Baptist Chapel. (Great cheering.) The chairman had discharged the duties devolving upon him that evening in a creditable manner, and was highly deserving of their cordial approval. (Cheers.) Mr Davies also aunouoced that Mr Hague had kindly aontributed a guinea towards the bnilding fund, and this evoked author applause. The proceedings closed (With the national anthem.

Kliondda Poliue Intelligent.

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