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LONDON LETTER. AVhether a Trades Union is a warrantable Institution from the severely economical point of view I have never been clever enough to deter- mine. But from my youth upwards, I have been taught the doctrine that what is sauce for the goose is sauoe for the gander. Wherefore, if Xrades Unionism is good for men, it cannot bo evil for women. The Women's Protective and Provident League is virtually a society of that dasa, and it was formed years ago because the working-women came to the conclusion that the working-men were not very anxious to help them. They certainly had a good deal of reason to adopt that belief. I remember a Trades Union Congress somewhere in Newman-street, off Oxford-street, which was very lively indeed. That was the meeting from which certain Fair Trade gentlemen were literally taken by the coat- collar and turned into the street; and on the day after that exercise of persuasive force I heard two women representatives (they were properly elected delegates) shouted down, and saw them outvoted by about a hundred to oi)e. A special effort is now being made to increase the number of branches of the league above wiaii- tioned, for in these days, apparently, women must work as well as men. If, however, tiie action of these leagues should increase the Kn- tagonism between the workers of the sexes, the Tbenefit wil) be doubtful. JSTone nut envious brethren in the profession, and spiteful critics, can surely sneer at Fred -Cewen, the young musical composer, for having made a good financial bargain with the raasaagers of the Melbourne Exhibition. He is going out to Australia in May, a.nd will remain there tø the end of the year, and for this he is to receive £ -7 >00. No doubt that is splendid the musical arrangements of .a Colonial show.. The business, however, chiefly -concerns the Australians. If the colony is rich and plucky enough to shell out so i'.nndsomyly it is not for us to complain. Cowen so thoroughly modest and so amiable a man, «rd so sound and promising a musician, that he <■ ght to be congratulated with allaur hearts. I know him well, and have no doubt that if I j; e for another twenty years I shall see ] rn at the very top of the tree as a 'cf mpotier of oratorios. The composer of ijiiisic has to put up with quite an undue f:uiwunt of cold shoulder as a rule before he can 1: tke money, and Cowen has gone through this j."h«Ung mill like the rest. There are pieces v ,i"h he lui i to sell for a few guineas which are 1.: this Ii, hieut a steady income to the pub- it Probably not many of my readers harve seen a Tea) riding on a common seaside donkey •fi i^bcnubiics«ndsof a watering-place. I had that il.e: iraable privilege the other day at Bourne- r n'lt, where, in the afternoon, the Queen of Nt-(;e; i was pointed out tome holding OllitO the ciijgy p, ,m mei of the saddle of an ordinary Jerusa- ]<- in ponytbat vou might hire for a shilling-an hour. 'i'lIt-a we had the Royal wedding, of which f II accounts h:ive appeared in the daily papers. h, was a good f1.!a1 remarked that no moosenger or message of imp, dance had been sent by any member "of the English Royal family, and I noticed that the Duchess of Albany only kissed the bride on the left cheek, while other Royalties had an osculatory peck at both. But it must be remembered that our Queen is very strict, and the love-stricken Prince Oscar has had to pay .pretty clearly for marrying the lady of his choice for, according to all Royal notions, he has committed the unpardonable sin of marrying beneath him. The bride. }l('C Miss Munck. is not at all pretty, but she looks good. Nor is the Crown Princess of Denmark, who was present, pretty, while tho Duchess of Albany is passably £ o. d-locikiiig. The Queen of Sweden is remarkably plain. At the German Chapel Royal in London on Sunday I scanned the Royal ladies in the gallery, and could n, ,t forbear internally making the same tmgallaiit comment. Of our Princess of Wales this can al ways be said—no one 1: flatter her.. She is getting ju-1 a triiie sharp of feature, but is the Inl,st toeantihll WI man in society-even now, and looks literally no older than her daughters. Touching the Geman Chapel Royal, where the official funeral service for Iviiiser iftiam wti held 011 Sunday, I must confess thatt was not nware of its existence until a ticket of sidnussion to the service was sent me. Then I got down my "Old and New Loudon." trnm which we all post ourselves up when we wans to appear very learned about London districts, loeal liistoRes, or public buildings, and found some little here and there to enlighten me. It seems that there used to be a Roman Catholic chapel on tk1 situ in the Stuart days, and that. witou Marlborough House was bought by the Crown as a residence for Princess Charlotte and Prince Leopold, a Lutheran place of worship was built. It as sel- dom attended by any mernliers .of our Ti<*y:-tl Loose. The Queen has her own private services at Windsor; she has not been in a London church ori an ordinary occasion for many years; and the Prince and Princess of Wales, when they do not attend the Chapel Royal, Whitehall, g7l to All Saints', or St. Margaret's, two of the most Ritualistic of West End churches. The German Chapel Royal has a service, however, every Sunday morning, the chaplain being a tine old octogenarian pastor of the simple Genevan school. It is always full, and the German Ambassador aud his large suite attend it resrulaiiv. If it is ftorrest to employ the term "ymmg Uizzard," that is the sort of atmospheric visitation we have been enjoying in London for a week past. Every day, and all day long, the air has oeen filled with minute particles of hard frozen snow, ai d we only want a noiwv gala, and tne slightest change in the wind to taste a real blizzard. In 1881 there was a perfectly awful snow storm in the metropolis, but we had not then learned to call it by its real name. We can iiow see from its descriptions in the American papers that it was a bond fide blizzard and ''an also see that we have been on the verge, of ona for several (lavs past. The ultimate fate of public celebrities who retire into private life is always an interesting subject of f-.peculation. Sometimes they are absolutely forgotten until their death was ,(- I -itall 1.1 minoiniced, or their name is accidentally brt before the public. One name occurs to me at this moment. What has become of Henry Russell, whose songs were familiar us household words thirty years ago ? He is st.i:} alivo, for a friend of mire heard from him less than a month since. Elir-ra Cook has been dead some tune; but she vanished so mysteriously that thero is no record, that I can find, of the time and ria;.iior of her death. But let me take a step fr Mr. the sublime to the ridiculous. I had of ten wondered what had become of Jem Mace, the prixc-fighter of an era when pugilists did fight, and were not impostors. Had he set up a public-house, as many of his confreres did ? An action just tried in a London county conrt brought tr light the fact that J. M. is alive and carrying on business as a teacher of the ij. ble art of self-defence—with fists and foils. He resif od the extortionate charges of a trades- man, aud won his case too. W. S.

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