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MONDAY, AMit. 35. CRITICAL…

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MONDAY, AMit. 35. CRITICAL STATE OF AFFAIRS. The special correspondent of the Standard, who has just returned to Fort Amiel fruuI a town in the Transvaal, telegraphs that the con- clusion he has arrived at is that the situation Is distinctly critical. When the treaty of peace was signed the Boers agreed to abide by the decision of the Royal Com- mission on certain specified points. They now threaten that they will accept nothing which will infringe upon their supposed rights, nor will they consent to aaf cession of territory. At present, therefore, it would be a farce for the commission to hold its sittings. The word Suzerainty" also seems likely to occasion difl. culties. The Boer people are suffering more or low from a military fever. Many of them fully believe that if tbe.war recommenoes they will be able to drive the English into the sea. A wide difference exists be- tween the views of the Boer leaders and tboas of the m.s of the people. An embarrassing incident has occurred near Wak- kerstroom. A Boer named Rensberg, who had taken possession of a farm belonging to an Englishman we- fused to evacuate it when called upon to do so. The landdrost wrote to him asking him to go to New- castle to discuss the matter there. Rensberg refused to receive the letter, and ordered the messenger te leave his premises. The native question is also ominous of evil. Several cases have occurred of ill-treatment, and even murder of natives by the Boers, and sworn informations have been made before the Transvaal magiatrat- s. During the progress of the hostilities the Boers seized the property and cattle of the natives right and left. The natives, trusting to the restoration of British suflfremacy, obeyed our officials, and made no reprisals, notwithstanding that the Boer farms lay at their mercy, owing to the absence of the men at the war. They now naturally complain that they have been robbed, and that apparently there is no prospect of redress, and much trouble is anticipated on this score. In the opinion of the officials who are best qualified to judge, tne natives of the Transvaal, having once experienced tbe advantages of English rule, will not submit to the government of the Boers. The English pay for native labour; the Boers do not. Consequently the latter have lately experienced increasing difficulty in obtaining any native service, and this was un- doubtedly one reason of the recent rebellion. In order to meet the withdrawal of English com- merce and capital M. Joubert has stacted a scheme for national banking and trading companies. ft The exodus of English from the Transvaal has si- ready commenced. Some six or seven families pass this place daily on their way to Natal. The Boer leaders have arrived. The meeting at the Royal Commission is again indefinitely postponed. The cause of this new and provoking delay is, we are told, Sir Hercules Robinson's inability to attend. The following is the substanoe of an authentie speci- men of the petitions now being addressed to the British authorities by the native chiefs in the Trans- vaal The chief prays for information as to whether the English have really been beaten by the Been. He asks when the British governor, if It be actually the case that the insurgents have been victorious, pro- poses to leave the country also when the commis- sion is to sit. I-s, he inquires, the peace which has been agreed to a genuine peace? May hidribe move about the country without fear of insult or outrage* May they consider that the road to Pretoria is open to them ee that they may buy and sell, barter and traffio freely, and generally dispose of their produce without risk of molestation ? He and his people are vary »ad on account of the disasters that have fallen 08 the British arms. They had felt certain that the English governor would always remain as the ruler of the Transvaal, and be their father and protector. Now, however, they feel that they are abandoned te the Boers; and they, therefore, implore that the English, previous to their abdication of authority in the Transvaal, will at least not ignore the interests of the black population, or forget to make such terms on their behalf as will cause them to bless the Government of the Queen in years to come. They pray that the commission wm make careful stipulations for the protection of the natives against the tyranny and oppression of the Boers- and that no peace will be accepted which » not a real peace, so|far as the interuta of the black population are involved. General Wood, not unmoved by such pathetic appeals, has drawn up a skilfully worded statement, which is to be circulated among the natives. In it recent events are described in a manner which it is hoped will havs a soothing influence upon these poor people. The Durban correspondent of the Daily Newt telegraphed on Sunday :— Advices from the Transvaal seem to forebode far- ther troubles. A strong party of Boers threaten the resumption of hostilities unless the whole of the Transvaal be given up unconditionally. The. mission will probably sit this month. Chief Justice Villiers arrived here yesterday. Sir Hercules Robinson is expected shortly in the Orontss. Fresh evidence goes to shsw that the Bronker's Spruit engagement was a fair fight.

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. LONDON CLUBS AND SOCIETY.…

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Y GOLOFN GYMREIG.

Y THEATRE.

GWELLIANT GWALL.

Y DYN PWFFYDDOL.

Y "WYSTL FAELFA" (PAWNSHOP.)

CYFLWYNEDIG I DR. REES HOPKINS,…

PENILLION I'R ANRYDEDDUS W.…

ST. CATHERINE'S CHURCH.

YSTRADYFODWG LOCAL BOARD

PENTRE POLICE COURT.

PONTYPRIDD POLICE COURT. -

CAERPHILLY POLICE COURT. -

|THE OLD WATCHMAKER.

IMPORTANT DISPUTE AT PENYGRAIG…

ELECTION INTELLIGENCE.

THE LATE LORD BEACONSFIELD.

----THE TRANSVAAL.