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Family Notices

MR. GLADSTONE'S LANU BILL.

PALM SUNDAY.

WESLEYAN MlSSIONARY MEETING…

AN AMERICAN ABDUCTION CASE.

FEARFUL DEATH OF A CHILD AT…

THE NON-CONFORMISTS AND THE…

FERNDALE AFFILIATION CASE,

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FERNDALE AFFILIATION CASE, A SCENE IN COURT. At the Pentre police-court, on Monday (before Mr G. Williams, Stipendiary), Esther Evans, Fern- dale, charged Griffith Davies, of the same place, with being the father of her illegitimate child. Mr W. Simons (Simons and Plews) appeared for the defendant. The case was an ordinary one of its class, and but for what occurred between Mr Simons and the Bench at its close, would not re- quire comment. The complainant earned her livelihood by working on one of the Ferndale tips. The defendant is a collier, employed in the same neighbourhood, and is one of the Sunday School leaders, as he told the Bench, with the Baptists in the locality. The complainant was almost totally ignorant of English, and was very obtuse even in the Welsh language. His worship, observing this, and taking, apparently, into consideration the well- known energy with which Mr Simons conducts his cases, took great pains to elicit from the com- plainant her evidence. So obtuse was the com- plainant that, although she knew that the defen- dant first went about with her as her sweetheart in February, 1880, she could not say in what part of the year February occurred. The name of the month was given her in both Welsh and Engl'sh, yet she could not tell, saying Indeed, she was no scholar." A food deal of evidence was given on each side, and its nature, and the manner of the witnesses for the defence, made a decidedly unfavourable impression upon the court. The defendant was then sworn. He said that the first tima he ever saw complainant was on the 3rd July, 1880. A "Cheap Jack" had come to Ferndale the day before. 6he came down to his house with others, and he played on the harmonium tunes which he was to play in the local Sunday School Centenary procession on the 19th July. Some conversation took place as to the schools. There was gas at Cheap Jack's" mart that night 4, Mr Simons put in a gas-fitting account in con- firmation of defendant's last assertion. Defendant continued I have been intimate with complainant three times only, and each time I gave her Is. She never told me that she was in the family-way. i:y the Bench Had not spoken to complainant before she came to my house, and the reason why I went with her was because she came there. Complainant came to the house with Mary Ann Davies and John Harris. The Stipendiary: Did you ask Davies to ask complainant to come to your house ?—No John Harris asked her. The Stipendiary Did you go with the gfi4 on the night she came to the house ?—Yes, and I was with her several times afterwards. The Stipendiary Walking about Ferndale ?— Yes, sir. The Stipendiary About the streets ?—Yes Enoch Williams only saw us once. The Stipendiary: I suppose that inasmuch as you accompanied, on the harmonium, the Sunday- school singing at the Centenary, you are a pretty well known man at Ferndale ?-Yes, sir. The Stipendiary And yet you tell me that ypu walked about Ferndale streets in daylight with a girl whom you paid for committing immorality with ?—Yes. The complainant handed to the Bench the fol- lowing testimonial as to her character from Mr J. Williams, Glen View Villa, Ferndale I have known Esther Evans for twelve years, and I have much pleasure in stating that she has conducted herself highly satisfactory until this misfortuue befell her." His Worship pointed out to the defendant that he had himself admitted that he had gone about Ferndale publicly with the com- plainant. This had been confirmed by his own witnesses. Was it credible that he, a Sunday School leader at Ferndale, had walked about publicly in the place, where both were well known, with a girl who, according to his testimony, was no better than a common prostitute ? The thing, remarked his worship, was incredible, and he gave judgment for the complainant. His worship was in the act of delivering judgment as to the various items the defendant would have to pay the complainant, when Mr Simons sprang to his feet, and pushing back from his forehead the black velvet cap he wore, declared in a towering rage, he would appeal at his own expense against the decision of the Bench He was bound to say he had never been so treated in all the days of his history. He ex- pressed his surprise at what he characterised the ignorance of the Bench as to the habits of the class to which his client belonged. His worship, who succeeded in retaining his usual calmness said that the conduct of the defen- dant was exceptional in Wales, the reference by both being to the fact that the defendant, a Sunday School leader, had walked publicly with one whom he alleged to be a prostitute, and that among their acquaintances. Mr. Simons continued to speak excitedly, and his w< rship said he would adjourn the court, and with that view atoftd up and walked to the steps leading from the platform where he sat. Standing on the top of the steps, his worship, addressing )h. Simons, asked him if he was going to say anything more. Mr Simon, sitting down somewhat hurriedly, said, No, you have had enough but he declined to apologise for what had transpired. His Worship said that he would never again hear a case in which Mr Simons appeared until he offered an apology. Mr Simons proceeded to write with great rapidity That over, he stood, and addressing the poor complainant in a voice trem- bling with apparently suppressed anger, gave her notice that he would appeal to the next quarter sessions against the decision of the Bench in her case. Then. picking up his bag, and hat, he left the court. The affair was witnessed with consterna- tion by a crowded court.

THE DINAS AND PENYGRAIG BRITISH…

FAlRPlAY " EXl'EKTO CREUE."

PONTYPRIDD BOA K D OF GU A…

PONTYPRIDD POLICE COURT.

THE LATE UlNAS EXPLOSION.

CONCEALMENT OF BIRTH AT PONTYPRIDD.