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I DIARY OF COMING ENGAGEMENTS.

- PRACTICAL CHURCHMEN.

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LOCAL -NEWS. ^

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Lady Barrymore has returned to town from Fota, co. Cork. Congratulations to the Very Rev. the Dean of Chester, who on Monday last celebrated his 74th birthday. The Marchioness of Anglesey has returned to London, from Paris, and is settled in her new residence, 7, Ovington Gardens. The Right Hon. George Wyndham, M.P., and Countess Grosvenor left town on Friday night for Saighton Grange, Chester. Mr. Harmood Banner, M.P., was on Friday unanimously re-elected chairman of the Finance Committee of the Liverpool Corporation. We are glad to state that Dr. King, who has been seriously ill, is now making satisfactory pro gress. The Countess Grosvenor left Saighton on Monday for Lumley Castle, Chester-Ie-street. Her ladyship will be away about a week. The Earl of Crowe, chairman of the political committee, will preside at the complimentary dinner to Sir Edwin A. Cornwall at the National Liberal Club next Monday. The Earl of Shrewsbury and Talbot entertained a shooting party at Ingestre last week, among the guests being the Earl and Countess of Lonsdale. the Earl of Enniskillen, Lord Falconer, Viscount and Viscountess Ingestre, Viscount Castlereagh, and the Marquess of Anglesey. A record bag of pheasants was obtained. Mr. Yerburgh, M.P., to his great regret, was prevented from attending the Chester Diocesan Conference by a long-standing engagement to speak at an important meeting at Tewkes- bury, on Wednesday. On Monday the member for Chester addressed a meeting on Agri- cultural Co-operation at Clophill, Bedfordshire, and yesterday (Tuesday) he had undertaken to open a debate on "National Service" at the Y.M.C.A. Literary and Debating Society, London. Viscount Southwell was thirty-three last week. He is an Irish peer who has no seat in Ireland, for though he owns property in several Irish counties, his residence, purchased since his marriage, is near Overton-on-Dee, on the borders of Cheshire and Flintshire. Lord Southwell has been a baronet of the United Kingdom and a Viscount in the Green Isle since he was six years of age. He is a nephew of Sir Evelyn Wood, and married Sir John Walrond'^ youngest daughter. A CHESHIRE OFFICER'S PROMOTION.— The London Gazette" of last week contained the announcement of the promotion to captain of Mr. C. K. Napier Nunn, A S.C. We congratulate the Rev. C. R. and Mrs. Nunn, Norley Vicarage, upon their son's rapid and deserved advancement. Originally intending to enter the Navy, in which he hoped to follow in the footsteps of his godfather, and a connection by marriage on his mother's side, as also of a former commanding officer of the old 22nd Regiment, he fitly joined the 3rd Battalion of the Cheshire Regiment. He was seconded to the 2nd Battalion in South Africa, but soon after, receiving an appointment to the Army Service Corps, became officer commanding section to the mobile column, obtaining the South African medal mobile column, obtaining the South African medal and six clasps, and a commission in the Corps. On returning to England he passed his examinations at Woolwich, Hythe, Aldershot and Birkenhead with credit, securing "distinguished" in C. Having I discharged the duties of acting-adjutant at the Curragh Camp for two years, he has now been given his company. Captain Nunn is a popular officer, and clever in amateur theatricals. We wish him continued success. The Grand Duke Miohael of Russia and the Countess Torby motored from Keele Park, Staffordshire, on Thursday, and did some shop- ping in Cheater. At the annual conference of the National Union of Conservative and Constitutional Asso- ciations, at Newcastle on Tuesday, the following wore among the vice-presidents cleted:-Il;ezl Egerton of Tatton, Mr. Robert Yerburgh, M.P., and Mr. B. O. Roberto. Lajdy Mary Criahton, who ia at present staying with her motJher, Katharine Duohesa of Westimn- ster, at Oo mberme rc> Abbey, will leave England in a few days for In<ii«L to join her husband, Lord Oriohton, who, aa Equerry bo the Prince of Wales, is already in India. Lord and Lady Orichtoii will return to England about March. The Secretary of the Chester General Infirmary begs to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of a parcel of fruit and confectionery sent by Mr. R. A. Yerburgh, M.P., from the Hoole Welsh Wesleyan Mission Sale of Work (per Mr. Joseph Benn) for the use of the patients; also a postal order for 2s. 6d., issued from Stocks-lane, Chester, being an anony- mous donation. Thursday was the first birthday of Earl Gros- venor, eon of the Duke and Duahesa of West- minister. At Eaton, in oelebration of the event, the Countess Groevenor entertained a party of sixty or seventy at tea. AfberwardB there was a. display of fireworks. There was also a. service in the dhapel, oonduoted by the Rev. M. W. Kin- loch. reotor of Eooleston. ST. JOHN'S WARD VACANCY.-We learn that in response to an invitation from the Radical party, Mr. F. F. Brown has consented to stand as a candidate for the vacancy in St. John's ward, caused by the death of Mr. A. W. Butt. SCIENCE AND ART AND TECHNICAL SCHOOLS.—We are officially informed that the prizes will be presented to the students by the Countess Grosvenor, after which an address will be delivered by the Right Hon. George Wyndham, M.P., in the Assembly Room, at the Town Hall, on Friday, December 1st, at 8 p.m. CHESTER PUBLIC LIBRARY.—The follow- ing is the return of the issue of books for the week ending Nov. 18th, 1905:-Lending department: Religion and philosophy, 1; sociology, 0; arts, sciences and natural history, 19; history, biography, geography and travels, 24; poetry and the drama, G prose fiction, 721; miscellaneous literature, *9 juvenile literature, 143 total, 923. Reference department: Religion and philosophy, 0; sociology, 3; arts, sciences and natural history, 22; history, biography, geography and travels, 12 poetry and the drama, 9; encyclopaedias, dictionaries, etc., 222 miscellaneous literature, 4 total, 272 com- bined total, 1,195; daily average (lending depart- ment), 185; daily average (reference department), 45 combined daily average, 230. THE HOOLE BAZAAR.—The total receipts of the Hoole Welsh Wesleyan Mission Sale of Work are expected to reach £90. TRAM RETURNS -The trams carried 36,008 passengers, and the roooipta amounted to £150 5s. 6d. Compared with the corresponding week of last year, the figures shew an increase of 1,737 paiscngers and' of j62. 3s. lid. in tho receipts). ACCIDENT TO LORD DELAMERE'S AGENT.—Mr. J. P. Jack/son, of Whifcegate, near "insford, Lord DeAamere'a agent, was cycling along the drive to Vaio Royal, when a dog be- longing to Oapt. Harrison, who is occupying the hall. ran in front of him. Mr. Jackson was thrown violently from the machine, and sustained in- juries to his hoad and shoulders that rendered him unconscious. PRESENTATION AT CHESTER WORK- HOUSE—A very interesting ceremony took place at the Chester Workhouse on Monday evening last, when tho inmates took the opportunity of presenting a testimonial to their laie esteemed assistant porter, Mr. Arthur Richardson, on his retirement to take up a better appointment at Stockport Hospital. The presientation took the form of a handsome umbrella with a suitable ad- dress. PROPOSED FLINTSHIRE LIGHT RAIL- WAY.—At the meeting of the Holywell Rural Council on Friday, the plans of a light railway in the parish of Newmarket, in regard to which a "Bill is being promoted by the London and North- Western Railway Company, were submitted for assent. After some discussion it was decided to give the assent of the Council, subject to anything necessary to protect the roads and rights of way and drainage being provided. WOMAN S STRANGE DEATH.-n, o circum- stances have been reported to tho city coroner ■vM.r. E. Bras&ey) of the death of Mrs. Howard, married woman, aged) 30, living by herself at 23, Dee-lane, Chester. Deceased was seen on Satur- day night, but was not seen on the following day until 12.30 p.m In response to her calls a neighbour named Mrs. Patler went in the house and found her downstairs in a fainting oondition. Mrs. Tatler sent for a doctor, and Dr. Laws, who is assisting Dr. Roberto, Boughton, arrived. He called again in the evening. Mrs- Howard col- lapsed suddenly and died at 1.30 on Monday morn- ing. An inquest will be held. POPULARITY OF CHESHIRE CHEESE.- Katharine Duchess of Westminster, accompanied by Lady Mary Crichton. distributed the pnzls at the Whitchurch Dairy Show on Wednesday when Captain Ethelston presided, supported by Sir Wyndham Hanrner. Major GodsaJl, after referring to the increased demand for Cheshire cheese in London markets, said they heard a good deal about foreign competition and about scientific methods of dealing with the products of milk abroad especially in Holland. English farmers were, however, he said. too independent to submit to similar rigorous training discipline, but in his view these dairy associations with annual shows and periodical fairs constituted a system of training and organisation. CHESTER COMPENSATION CLAIM.—At Chester County Court on Thursday, His Honour Sir Horatio Lloyd gave judgment in an action heard at the last court, in which George Evans, described as a drover, sought compensation for injuries he received while in the employment of Mr. Johnson, farmer, Wrexham-road, in August last. Evans was engaged temporarily in agricultural work tor the defendant, and while employed in rooting a stack he fell from the ladder, which was alleged to be defective, dislocating his shoulders. He was engaged by the day in defendant's service at the rate of 3s. 6d. per day, and the accident happened on the third imorning, after he had worked two whole days. The respondent admitted liability and paid into court the sum cf t3. His Honour pointed out that there were only two questions involved in the case firstly, whether the disability of the plain- tiff had ceased, and secondly, as to the principle upon which compensation should be assessed. He was of opinion, upon the evidence, that the man's disability had practically ceased that the injury to his shoulder would not interfere with his future work. Defendant had in the circumstances treated plaintiff with a reasonable liberality, and no award would be made and no costs allowed. MISS EMILY GILES'S CONCERT.—Those who attended the Newgate-street Assembly-rooms on Tuesday evening, when Miss Emily Giles gave another of her delightful pianoforte recitals, were given a rare musical treat. The audience was large but not crowded. The programme was so arranged that Miss Giles had ample opportunity of displaying her talent in its widest scope, and it goes without saying that she succeeded in immensely pleasing her audience. The recital was agreeably varied by violin solos by Miss Kitty Woolley who deepened the favourable impression she gained on her previous visit to Chester, and by songs by Captain Oakshott. Miss Giles opened with Bach's Prelude and Fugue in F minor sonata for harpsichord, Scarlatti; and Arietta, Leonardo Leo, all composers of a century and a half ago, a period when musical art was at its best. Later she gave a Beethoven Sonata, Chopin's Ballade in G minor, a set of short pieces by Cyril Scott, and also took part with Miss Woolley in a sonata for violin and pianoforte by Brahms. Miss Woolley played a Romance by Max Bruch in a manner which charmed her listeners, and also Dvorak's "Humoresque," and Lederer's Poeme Hongrois, for which the audience would not be denied an encore. Capt. Oakshott, who was accompanied on the piano by his sister, had an admirable choice of songs, the first in Italian to Handel's well-known Largo; then two of Somer- vell's songs from Tennyson's Maud and lastly, Kingsley's "Sands o' Dee," to Clay's beautiful music. The vocalist did ample justice to each, although the last was probably the most appreciated. GRAND MASTER MILLS AND uLD-AGE PENSIONS.—Oddfellows from all parts of the country visited the Co-operative Hall, Droylsden, on Saturday evening to attend a meeting organised by the East Manchester District of the Manchester Unity of Oddfellows. The principal visitor was I Brother Thomas Mills, of Chester, the Grand Master of the Order, who said no friendly society ought to rest satisfied until it had provided old-age I pensions tor its members. He thought the time had arrived when the Manchester Unity might wisely take that step with safety to itself and with advantage to the community. It would be a grand thing for the State to provide old-age pensions for the industrial classes. The State had never recognised the great help which the friendly and co-operative societies had given in the government of the country. W^hat would have been the con- dition of the people to-day if it had not been for the self-sacrificing effort of the industrial classes themselves? Yet the savings of those classes had never been adequately protected by the Legisla- ture. (Applause.) The Government, he main- tained, had no right to register friendly societies that knew perfectly well they could never keep the Eromises they made to their members. (Applause ) !ertainly the protection of Parliament ought never to have been given to dividing societies, and he hoped that protection would be withdrawn. (Hear, hear.) It was criminal folly to compel a good citizen to herd with the drunken and the dissolute simply because in his declining years he had to seek the aid of the poor law. (Applause.) THE LATE MR. WILLIAMSON JONES.- in1uest on the remains of the late Mr. Williamson Jones, a former member of the Chester Town Council, was held at the Town Hall on Tuesday by the city coroner (Mr. E. Brassey). Mr. F. L. Hancock, Buckley, and his solicitor, Mr. N. A. E. Way, attended.-The Coroner said deceased had been a member of the Town Council for 15 years. He was a man well- known in the city, and a man of great force of mind and great independence of character, and at one time he was a prominent feature of the Council. On October 7th, deceased, who was 77 years of age and rather blind and deaf, was knocked down by a horse and trap belonging to Mr. Hancock, Buckley, and he died from the effect of the shock.—Dr. J. Roberts, Abbey-square, said he was called in on October 8th. He found deceased in a dazed con- dition, which subsequently passed away. Deceased suffered from a contusion of the right leg and the side. He died from cardiacal weakness accelerated by the shock of the accident. Deceased blamed no one and said it was a pure accident.—Arthur Clarke, 2, Tarvin-road, said he saw the accident from the shop at 63, Bridge-street. Mr. Jones was crossing the road by the fountain, when he was knocked down by a trap, the horse attached to it having been startled by a passing tram-car. No blame attached to anyone.-A man named David Evan Williams gave corroborative evidence.—One of the jurymen said he had seen the accident and he could quite bear out what the witnesses had said.—The Coroner said it reminded one of the time when only people who had some knowledge of the event were summoned on juries. A verdict of Accidental death was returned. Deceased at the time of his death was a widower, and he left a grown-up family.

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A FORGIVING WIFE. ------

THE LATE MR. C. EDWARDS. --...-.--