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156 YEARS AGO. .

LOCAL GOVERNMENT JOTTINGS.…

[No title]

'"STTT/PHOLTNE RTCTN LOTION.

CHESTER v. HOOLE. --+--

THE CHURCHES. ! — I

[No title]

.__--------__-----------THE…

HOOTOX PARK RACES. ~— -+

------LITERARY NOTICES. ..,.,.'

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ROSSETT.

' CONNAH'S QUAY.

---..--.-+----HESWALL.

IFRODSHAM.

--.--.-... fALP A.

---.---+ ELLESMEKE PORT.

NESTON,

. HAWARDEN.

WREXHAM

4-,.._ --------------DON'T…

------LITERARY NOTICES. ..,.,.'

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tents raises the old question whether didactic versa is really poetry after all. Again the answer must be negative. The truei poet- is "of imagina- tion all compact," and hero, for the most part, matters of fact are set forth ia verce. The metrical form may aid the memory, and will do no more. Some of the pieces are exempt from this criticism. "Robin Legends" and "The Birth of the Snowdrop" are instances. Wo may add that the get-up of the volume is high!y credit- able to the publisher. THE MARQUIS OF PUTNEY (By Richard Marsh. London: Methuen and Co., 6s.).—In his latest romance Mr. Marsh is treading his favourite ground of mystery, the mystery attending the kid- napping of the Marquis of Putney, a. tiny baby. during his daily airing in Hyde Park under the charge of his nurses. Envy, malice, hatred and all unoharitableness are naturally at the root of the mystery, but years pass and stilt the riddle is unsolved. The missing heir to the vast estates has dropped as completely out of sight as if the earth had opened and swallowed him up. Sus- picion lights in a certain quarter, but the story has to be followed to the end before. the true clue is found. Matters are complicated by the fact that the injured parties, the bereaved Duke and Duchess, have each a past which it behoves them to conceal, and which play no small part in the elaboration of the story. The plot, shews distinct, originality of conception, and is worked out with skill and boldness. The interest is never suffered to flag, and the reader who takes the book in hand will pursue the theme right up to the end. "THE PIE AND THE PATTY-PAN" (By Beatrix Potter. London: Fredk. and Co., Is.)-—Mies Potter's new book for children is issued in good time for a Christmas gift. The series of these comic picture-books, commencing with the famous "Peter Rabbit," is now growing into quite a little library. The tragedy attending the pie baked by the feline cook, "Ribby," and its consumption by the canine guest, "Duchess," is full of whimsical humour peculiar to the author, while the pictures teem with merriment. The facial expression in the animal portraits shews the true artist. PICTURE POST-CARDS.—The picture post- cards published by Mr. J. W. Ruddock, Lincoln, are clever reproductions of water-colours, and the series is fully representative of the Provinces of England, two oote of Chester views being included.