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A RETURN OF FINE WEATHER.

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A RETURN OF FINE WEATHER. After a considerable rainfall the past week brought an appreciable return of dry and season- able weather that enabled cultivation to be resumed under favourable circumstances and giving those farmers who were behind with their sowings a good opportunity to recover lost time. The month so far has proved seasonably mild, notwith- standing a few nips of frost, and the early sown grain is brairding well, the ground altogether being in good condition for the germination of the seed. Though one is apt to get impatient at a sharp rainfall at a critical season, the recent rains after all proved none too much for general purposes cultivation which has been proceeding in good form during the week, and the bulk of seeding may now be said to be fairly accomplished. It is to be hoped that the remainder of the month and a week or two later may continue dry to allow a fair com- pletion of arrears of ploughing, as well as any other work that is needed such as the clearing roots off the land, some of which remains to be done even yet. Pastures, which have kept green up till quite recently, begin now to wear a wintry aspect, and stuck requires increasing assistance from other sources. At the recent- Norwich Cattle Show his Majesty the King took the first, second and third prized for shorthorns, a special prize for shearling wetiueis, and for the best pen of sheep. The Queen was first with silver Soabright bantams, besides 'receiving high commendation. He* Majesty also received a reserve and high com- mendation in the class for silkies. Aa usual, the King's fat stock from the Royal (aims at Windsor will be sent to the Slough Christmas cattle show, to be disposed of on Dec. 12th. His Majesty's consignment will consist of 282 bead, and will comprise 32 Devon bullocks, 150 Hampshire Down and Southdown sheep, and 100 Berkshire bacon hogs and porkers. According to news from France, it appears that the autumn weather in that country has been j cauoh on a par ■with that experienced hare, with this eocoeption, that while we were suffering1 from this eocoeption, that while we were suffering from drought French agriculturists were hindered in their oorn sowing by too much wet. Frosts were frequent and severe in October, and enow foil in tome distnots. Speaking at the oper.ing of a fruit and chrys- anthemum show at Bewdley recently, the Earl of Coventry seid without oo-operation he felt that jt would be very difficult indeed in the' future for farmers to make both ends meet, as they had so many competiitois; and unprotected &3 they were, they could not get the fair prices they were entitled to. He wished he could get men of means to take their share in the agrioul- tural work of the country, for agriculture could not get on without their support. FARM SERVANTS HIRINGS. At the Carlisle luring fair for farm servants tbeno was a large gathering of men and boys, but the hirings were slow. The highest wages for best men ranged from 214 to J616, second-close £12 to j613, st-rong youths £ 9 to JBll, and boya JB5 to LB. Womeai and girl servants were scarce. and1 commanded good wagrM-experienoed women from £10 to £ 12, others JB8 to 29, and girls from :£5. At the Kendall hiring fair there was a larger supply of labour, and wages were down to from L17 to £ .18 for best men, second-class men 212 to £ 15, and youths £ 6 to E8. A better demand for women and girls enabled experienced women to obtain £ 11 to £ 15. and girls f,5 to £ 8. CROP VALUES IN IRELAND. The writer of an article on "ThÐ Position of Irish Agriculture in 1904" gives some figures rc- specting the values of the several crops during last j-ear, which, if they are only approximate, may possess interest for many English readers. The aggregate he sets down at E30,098,000, in- cluding ha.y fron:. permanent pasture, and made up ae follows: —Wheat £198,000, barley L346,000, here and rye, £ 40,000, beans and peas, £ 14,000, oats £ 4,761,000, flax £ 510,000,potatoes £5,945,000, turnips £ 2,998,000, mangolds £ 999,000, rotation hay E4,685,00,3, and hay from permanent grass £ 9,102,000. LINCOLN RED SHORTHORNS AS MILKERS In the course of a report published by Mr. John Evens of his milk record for the pa,st year, the average yield for 43 cows., including eight first-calf heifers, works out at the satisfactory figuro of 842 gailons per cow, compared with 780 gallons in 1904. This, however, is stated to be only fifth on tha list of fifteen averages, the best having- been 839 gallons for forty-throo head in 1896, while in 1897 the average for thirty-six head Was 881 gallons, in 1895 for forty-three 867 gal- lons, !I:nd in 1890 for thirty-four head 860 gallons It appears that the highest individual yield during the past year was 1,446 gallons for a oow named Young Cherry, which had been in milk 350 days; other ton" animals yielded over 1,000 gallons, and the lowest individual total yield waa 428 gallons. Such records as this of Mr. Evens'3 constitute a. splendid object lesson for the dairy farmer, who would be well informed to ascertain on which stie t-ho balance-sheet his profits or loasea lie- THE EMBARGO ON CANADIAN CATTLE. At the first meeting of the Liverpool Corpora- tion Markets Committee for the prasent munici- pa.l year the question of the embargo on the importation of foreign cattle, which have now to be slaughtered within ten days of arrival at tbo port of disembarkation, was considered and dia- cussed. It was argued that the present arrange- Irdmtiha3 a detrimental effect on the meat supply of the country, and that farmers would be able toO strengthen the breed of their stock and to. bufirelit by millions of pounds sterling per annum by kitting their land for grazing purposes by free importation, and the committee unanimously passed a resolution to the effect that the restric- tions on the importation of Canadian cattle in- juriously affect the meat of Great Britain, and are a serious injustice to farmers and con- sumers. They believe that the removal of the restrictions would be beneficial to the trade of the port and of the public cattle market; and they strongly support the action which is being taken for obtaining euch an amendment of the Diseases of Animals Act. 1896, as will permit of the landing of Ca,na-dian cattle into this country without being required to be slaughtered at the ports of disem- barkation. A conference of murucipajlities amd associations interested is to be held in London on the 27th insit. GROWING BEET-SUGAR IN ENGLAND. The possibility of the establishment of beet- sugar faotoriiee in this country, says the "Grocer's Gazette," is being seriously canvassed in several parta of the country, and an interest- ing report on the matter has been issued from Lincolnshire. Mr. W. Hazlett Roberts, the author of the report, states that Owston Ferry, on the banks of the Trent, is the site selected, and already secured, for the first factory, and it is assumed that all the land for many miles around thero will grow heavy crops of beet. The rtohness of the roots in sugar depends almost en- tirely upon the seed planted, but it is stated that on the land at the Isle of Axholme pda/nting rrations to any extent may be carried on with oertainty of g-ettring good crops. On 3,000 acres of such land it is calculated that 60,000 tons of sugar-beet may be produced, which, if sold by growers at 15s. a ton, would bring £ 45,000. A whaat crop on the same area yielding at the rate of four quarters per acre would bring in L18,000, the balance in favour of sugar-beet in the gross being £ 27,000, or £ 9 per acre. This leaves out of account the value of the wheat straw, as it does a!-go that of the tops of the sugar- beet, which are valuable both for cattle food and manure. The balance-sheet in connection with this undertaking estimates that from 60,000 tons of siugar-beet 8,000 tons of sugar would be pro- duced, and this, at the current rate of 210 per ton, would bring in £ 80,090; 15 tons of pulp at 12s. per ton, 2900; 1,000 tons of molasses at £ 2 16s. 8d. per ton, £ 2,333. 6s. 8d.; saturation lime for manure, £ 500; total, £ 91,833. 6s 3d. On the other side, 60,000 tons of beet is estimated to oost 245,ODD: ooet of operating at 6s. per ton of beet, 218,00b; balance for office and staff ex- penses, management, reserve, depreciation, and interest on capital, £ 28,833. 6s, 8d. Experiments carried out on the estate of the Earl of Denbigh, at Newnham Paddox, Warwickshire, resulted in an average yield of cleaned roots (tops removed) of 16 tons 3cwt. 2qr. 13lb. per acre, the best crop being within 5cwt. of 17 tons, and the lightest lOtons 17cwt. These crops oontairaod a greater peroembaee of sugar as* compared with German crops, the average being 88.49 for the English as against 85.63 for the German roots.

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