Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

25 articles on this Page

--.----_._ PARR'S BANK.

COMMERCIAL'S CONJUGAL RELATIONS.

DESTROYER IN DANGER.

YORK MEETING.

BATH & SOMERSET MEETING.

DEATH OF M. CONSTANT.

KING OF THE BAROTSIS, o

[No title]

PEACE PROSPECTS.

A MONITORY NOTE.

News
Cite
Share

A MONITORY NOTE. The proceedings at Friday's Cabinet Council, says Saturday's "Times," have naturally given rise to much speculation; but, in view of the extreme reserve maintained in responsible circles all through the different stages of the Pretoria nego- tiations, the various accounts to which publicity is given by the news agencies should be received with extreme caution. From the nature of the cir- cumstances in which the Cabinet Council was sum- moned, it may be inferred that the communica- tions submitted to it from the British authorities in Pretoria contained a statement of various points upon which an agreement has not yet been reached in the conferences with the Boer delegates, and in connection with which the latter have either asked for fuller explanations or pleaded for further con- cessions. Some of these points do not, probably, present serious difficulties; but others may have been regarded as inadmissable; and though on the whole there appear to be substantial grounds for hoping that the negotiations will result in the surrender of the Boer forces still in the field, it 8 u rr(, would be premature to assume that an immediate agreement on all the chief points is within sight. The terms of the reply to be given to the Boer delegates by his Majesty's High Commissioner and the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa. are c understood to have been settled at the Cabinet Council, and the delegates will in turn communi- cate them to the representatives of the com- mandos assembled at Vereeniging. Shortly after the Cabinet Council, which lasted nearly two hours, most of the Ministers returned to the country, as some little time may be ex- pected to elapse before the final resolution of the Boers is made known. Mr. Balfour proceeded to Hatfield on a visit to Lord Salisbury. Mr. Chamberlain, however, remained in town. IMPORTANT REFERENCES. MR. BRODRICK AND LORD ROSEBERY. At the dinner of the Volunteer Service Officers, Mr. Brodrick, in the course of his reply to the toast of the Imperial Forces, said: "I should go beyond my duty to-night if I were to enter upon these communications which are now passing, and which are a prelude, as we all hope, to the sur- render of the Boers now in the field. (Cheers.) All I may say is this, that the Government are as determined as ever they were not to purohase a temporary immunity from trouble by sacrificing anvthing which would tend to the permanent peace and security of South Africa. (Loud cheers.) I do not suppose there is any man in this room who has more reason to wish for pce than I have. I do not suppose, also, that there is anyone more conscious that all true Imperialists, all those who have given up their time or have risked their lives in the war, and all those who are now en- gaged in it, and all, or very nearly all, politicians will be at our back in the declaration I have just made to you." Lord Rosebery, speaking at tne National Liberal Club on Friday night, briefly referred to the topic of the hour, and said: "I have never doubted, and I do not doubt, that since this, I will not say armistice, but this peaceable arrange- ment was entered into, practically on the basis of the Boers surrendering their ^dependence, peace was certain in South Africa. But at any rate, whether that be so or not, the conclusion of peace is only the beginning of pacification." UNCONDITIONAL SURRENDER. Pretoria, Friday. Mr. Seddon, the New Zealand Premier, speaking at an entertainment given in his honour, said, the soldiers and colonials having done their duty, it now devolved on the statesmen to do theirs, by securing peace, which, in the opinion of the majority, was only attainable by unconditional surrender. A SIGNIFICANT MESSAGE. Mr. Seddon, the New Zealand Premier, who has been in Pretoria, has telegraphed to Wellington that he has had a satisfactory interview with Lord Milner and Lord Kitchener, and that he does not consider the sending of another contingent is necessarv- According to a telegram from Pretoria. sent on Saturday, the advance portion of a commando had arrived at Balmoral, and the remainder of the commando was expected to arrive there at midnight to surrender. CABINET MEETING. The Cabinet met at 11.30 a.m. to-day. An idea prevailed that the meeting was not to be until noon. and consequently, there was no great assemblage of spectators in Downing-street when the Ministers began to arrive. Lord Salisbury came to town early. Much speculation prevails as to whether or not the gathering is to be followed by official announcements in the Commons. All the members were in attendance. The crowd waited until the Cabinet had been sitting about an hour and a half, and then quietly dispersed. Lord Balfour of Burleigh was the first Minister to leave the Foreign Office, he having to attend a sitting of the London Water Committee at 1.30 p.m. The other Ministers remained in Council. NO ANNOUNCEMENT TO-DAY. The Cabinet broke up at 1.45 p.m., and by 1.50all the Ministers had left the Foreign Office. It is believed no announcement of a definite character regarding peace negotiations will be made in the House this afternoon. IN THE BALANCE." BUDGET DISCUSSION INCONVENIENT. In the House of Commons to-day in a short dis- cussion concerning the business of the House, Mr. Balfour informed Sir Henry Campbell- Bannerman that it would be inconvenient to discuss the Budget while other things were in the balance. Mr. J. O'Kelly: Will Mr. Balfour inform the House' what terms have been offered to the Boers? No answer was given.

HELSBY.

[No title]

THE CHESHIRE YEOMANRY. .

CHESHIRE BRIGADE AT SALISBURY…

ECCLESTON.I

FARNDON.I

BARROW.

[No title]

DENBIGHSHIRE YEOMANRY. «——

CRICKET.

I BR0XT0N PETTY SESSIONS.…

:DESTRUCTION OF ST. PIERRE.…

[No title]

CHESTER STOCK & SHARE LIST…

MARKETS AND FAIRS.