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I THE KNIGHT-BARONET.

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[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] I THE KNIGHT-BARONET. BY EUSTACE de SALIS. EPILOGUE. The Kingdom has been through much—troubles Partial and troubles political—since we last met principle characters. The Civil War—in which Chester was so 11sastrously involved; the execution of the ill- at Stuart monarch; the gradual suppression internal strife the tyranny of the early days of rornwell's rule; the glory and fame attending te arms of England abroad during the existence ?t the Commonwealth—these have all passed lIlto history, and at this moment are matters of 1rorId-wide discussion. Oliver Cromwell—that name which struck terror into the hearts of England's Continental *Oes—having raised himself from the compara- tively insignificant position of a country gentle- P*an and a county member of Parliament, to the ^gh, onerous, and difficult post of Lord roteotor of the Commonwealth, has paid ij&ture's last debt, and for a brief space his son Richard has reigned in his stead. But being j°und wanting in the first essentials of a great uler-breadth of mind and determination to Achieve his ends—the pendulum of public opinion swung back again. The old order of things °btains once more; Royalty has been restored, d Charles—the second of that name—occupies e throne of his fathers. With the restoration a complete change comes oVer the people of England. The repressive tneasures and Puritanical doctrines so much in ?°&ue during the existence of the Commonwealth Ve now become things of the past. The has gone mad with joy over the change, d licence and liberty have become the order of day—a licence and a liberty that ill accords 1tIth the Cromwellian ideas of decency; a licence d a liberty that bids fair to sap the energy of lie English race. It is a glorious September morning in the year 1660. The city of Chester, forgetting the days of «er great troubles, has once again donned her holiday dress. She is about to welcome her new **ord Bishop: For with the restoration of the j^oyaJ race the episcopacy has again come into j>«ing, and the throne vacated by Dr. John **ridgeman, and for such a length of time Untenanted, is now about to be filled by a divine "ho has earned the goodwill of his Sovereign. ^,The trained bands of the city are drawn up along ^oregate-street and at the Barr's gate, while the tanous Cestrian companies and guilds line East- ate-street from the arch of that gate to the entice Court House. There is a busy and a cheerful hum of voices to be heard ascending as future actions of the coming Prelate are Abated, and if, here and there, long, narrow, aaow-faced individuals, who take no part in the ^lversal merriment and gaiety, are to be ^□served, these are but exceptions, and but serve to accentuate the feelings inspiring the crowd hlCh joyfully hails the restoration of a former state of affairs. One would think to gaze at those serried ranks, Pushing, gesticulating and laughing light- heartedly, that Chester had never been through Jhe terrible privations of a siege which had made her name a household term, and which was fol- lowed by a dire visitation of that most awful of aU human afBictions-the Plague. The Mayor *&d Corporation, in their official habiliments, are Mustered on the mayoral stand, which has, in Accordance with the customs of former days, been at the south-western end of Eastgate- ,|treet. And in that group there are several J^Qiiliar faces—features easily recognisable and changed since the fall of the city, although Nearly fifteen years have elapsed since that tragic event. The occasion for this display and this •Scleral rejoicing is the entry of Dr. Brian Walton, the recently consecrated Bishop of •he diocese, into the capital of his olesiastical jurisdiction. His entertainment fair to equal, if not, indeed, to excel, the hospitalities extended in former times by the citizens of Chester to their successive Sovereigns °¡r to individual members of the Royal race. The clergy of the city and county have gone forth to their new spiritual ruler, to express their "abounded joy at the restoration of the ePisoopacy, and to welcome him on his road devious to his official entry into Chester. The :fern.ory of the simple-minded, devout and kindly ohn Bridgeman is uppermost in the thoughts of majority, and it is admitted in most quarters if the new Prelate in any way approaches immediate predecessor in tolerance, manliness nd generosity, the See and its city will have ueh to be grateful for. On the mayoral platform those familiar *&ces of which we have spoken—faces filing a tale of increasing years and a drawing to the termination of race—are to be noted lit up with gaiety and J-Jerriment. The centre of an admiring group, the cynosure of all eyes, stands Nicholas Wyrvin ?~~bronzed, hardened and worn almost beyond Recognition, but nevertheless the Nicholas Wyrvin, his simplicity and in his honesty of purpose 1U his dealings with others, that we last heard of on the day of the capitulation of the city. And *j?ar him, casting loving and smiling glances in his direction, stands Cicely—no longer a Roseen- ffreave, however. It has come about as many had J*°ped and some few had prophesied—Nicholas Wyrvin's former playfellow had been his wife and the light of his life for more than twelve years. But hark! Thomas Cowper, now rapidly approaching the alloted three score and ten i^ars, is replying to a sally of his former ward's. Jime has dealt lightly with him. His hair ma-y ve silvered, his face lined by the advance of his carriage may not be so upright, per- chance even his stride may not be so masterful as yore. But the will is there, and the grave, Indly features betoken the inward man un- changed. He stands in the midst of his colleagues ^•almost the only link which connects the disastrous past with the present and a future that ^olds much promise. Most of his former sociates have travelled the unknown road, and 'he public affairs of the city are in the hands of new generation, which knows only by hearsay f the stirring times and those deeds of valour hich the resistance to Parliamentary aggression Called forth. „ My dear," Thomas Cowper said with a smile, I was very much assured in my own mind that both Nicholas and yourself would keep your word would spare no effort to be with us on this *uspicious occasion. But, as day followed day and you did not appear, I was forced to think 'hat you had been mistaken in London for their :touthful Majesties, and that the love of amuse- ment which I knew of old you possessed had Educed you to masquerade Uncle, uncle," she remonstrated. Did you think, sir, that were we mistaken for all the Royalties of Europe, made up in the persons of one individual couple, we should have dallied a foment in coming to you. You little know how have hungered—eh, Nickie?" giving her hus- band a playful push in the ribs, "for the sight of *°ur dear face. For shame a I know that; but after all you are so very Ighty-so apt to be turned from your course Y the veriest trifle." Do you hear that, sir," Cicely Wyrvin asked h&r husband indignantly. "Can you listen to such "11 accusation and not come to my rescue-a J'oinan to whom the most stiff-necked and un- bending Puritan of our settlement pays the Neatest deference, one who he believes can ver be in the wrong. Nickie, see that you champion me!" Nicholas Wyrvin, breaking off for the moment fhe conversation which he had been holding with {J?5 neighbour, turned round with a twinkle in eye.. if "I think, Cicely," he remarked quietly, that are very well able to stand up for yourself— *hat at least is the opinion at which the most •^bending Puritan of your settlement has arrived a ter some considerable experience of t Uncle," she cried, shaking her head reproach- fully, in all these years Nickie has never dared disobey me. See what your bad example has Iected. I think," she continued solemnly, "I II all make arrangements to return at once. It oUld never do to let Nickie get too much out hand. (To be eoncludcd.)

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