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CHESHIRE STANDING JOINT COMMITTEE.…

GRAVE CHARGE AGAINST A WIFE.…

DENBIGHSHIRE QUARTER SESSIONS.…

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ADJOURNED CHESHIRE QUARTER…

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ADJOURNED CHESHIRE QUARTER SESSIONS. ♦ The adjourned quarter sessions for the county of Chester were held on Thursday. The Chairman (Sir Horatio Lloyd), in his charge to the Grand Jury, said the calendar was a very ordinary one, the number of prisoners for trial being about the same as usual. FIRST COURT. (Before Sir Horatio Lloyd and other Magistrates.) SUCCESSFUL LICENSING APPEAL. Mrs. Mary Ealie, who formerly held a beer- house licence for the premises, 6, Hope-street, Birkenhead, appealed against the refusal of the justices to grant her a renewal of the licence.— Mr. E. H. Lloyd appeared for the appellant, and Mr. Clement Higgins, Q.C., and Mr. Trevor Lloyd appeared for the justices. The magistrates gave as their grounds for refusal that the licence was not required in the neigh- bourhood, and that the house was not duly qualified as by law required. The decision of the justices, Mr. Higgins explained, had rested mainly on the second ground that the house was not of the necessary value. In 1869 it was requisite for a licensed house to be of the annual value of X15, but the house in question was rated at only X13 nett. Eliminating the rates and taxes, the house in question was of the value of only something like 43. a week.—Mr. Lloyd said Mr. Higgins's contention was practically that the Birkenhead justices had been parties to a farce for thirty years, and the drink had been served in this house for that period under a licence which was valueless. It was perfectly true that under the Act of 1840 no licence could be granted to a dwelling-house unless it was rated upon a rent or annual value of X15, but in 1869, when justices' licences first came into existence, protection was granted to houses theretofore licensed, or, as the Act said, to houses in respect of which a licence is in force now." He therefore contended that the licence was in force on the 1st of May, 1869, and that when the licence was granted the dwelling-house was rated at the requisite amount. The justices below had practically held that this was an 1869 house, and their grounds of appeal plainly shewed that they regarded it as such.—The Court con- sidered the point, and on their return the Chairman said they were of opinion that they ought not to stop the case on the ground raised. The words where a licence is in force" in the Act of Parliament of 1869 meant a licence that was in force irrespective of whether or not it ought to have been in force. He thought after the lapse of 31 years they ought to assume that the justices at that time had some ground for doing as they had done. They might have thought that X13 did not represent the annual value of the premises. —Mr. Higgins, having failed in this contention, proceeded to argue that the premises at present were not of the requisite value of E15. He called three expert valuers in support of this whose valuations of the premises as a dwelling-house were all about 4s. a week.- Mr. Lloyd contended ithat if the licence were taken away the premises would let as a shop, for which they were admirably adapted, at a rental of over 6s. a week. He also called several expert valuers, who estimated the premises as a shop to be worth about 7s. 6d. a week. After consultation with the other magis- trates, the Chairman said the Bench were of opinion that the annual value of the premises exceeded 915 a year, and therefore the appeal would be allowed. The Bench granted a case for appeal on Mr. Higgins's first contention. A DISHONEST SERVANT. EVIL COMMUNICATIONS, &0. Martha Schroder (18), servant, pleaded guilty to stealing from the house of her employer, Isaac Harris, at Liscard, a gold lever hunting watch, a lady's hunting enamel watch, a lady's gold guard, a gold bracelet, a diamond ring, a gold double albert, a lady's gold ring, two 8ilvertable spoons, and 93 7s. 6d. in money on the 11th July. Mary O'Brien (18), servant, and Harry Williams (32), labourer, were indicted for receiving the stolen articles.—Mr. Colt Williams appeared for the prosecution. It appeared that the girl Schroder came to her mistress' house late on the night in question, and on being reprimanded by her mistress for her unpunctuality said she would leave her service. She went upstairs, and Mrs. Harris, on going subsequently into her bedroom, found her gold chain lying on the ioor. On opening her jewellery drawer, she found the contents, to the value of JE38, together with RZ 7s. 6d. in money, had gone. The lady charged her with having stolen them, but she denied it. Schroder had been seen on the same night talking to the other female prisoner, and the women got together and pawned a number ot the goods. The prisoner Williams, with whom the women kept company, received two of the stolen articles-a silver watch and chain.—In view of the fact that this was the first offence recorded against the female prisoners, the Court bound them over to appear for judgment if called upon on their promise to enter a home. Williams bore a serious criminal record, having been convicted on numerous occasions of serious offences, including burglary, and he had at present an unexpired period of eighteen months ticket-of-leave on a sentence of penal servitude for six years. He would be now sent to penal servitude for three years, and the sentence would include the year and a half he had to serve upon his previous sentence. A CALLOUS CHESTER MOTHER. Elizabeth Godwin (30) was indicted for wilfully neglecting her five children of ages ranging from two to seven years of age on the 13th August and on other occasions between the 12th May and the 12th August at Hoole, in a manner likely to cause them unnecessary suffering or injury to their health.—Mr. Trevor Lloyd, prosecuting on behalf of the N.S.P.C.C., said prisoner was the wife of an engine driver who was in receipt of good wages (£1 19s. a week). He, it appeared, was in no way to blame, as he had done all he could by handing to his wife all his wages each week. She, however, squandered the money in drink, frequently absented her- self from the house, and left her children to get on as best they could. The inspector of the society visited her on numerous occasions during June, July, and August, and repeatedly found her intoxicated, and the children in a very filthy state. Even since prisoner had been released on bail there had been no improvement in her conduct; her drunken habits and her neglect of the family continued.—The society's inspector (Mr. R. Nicol) and Dr. Harrison, police surgeon, having given evidence in support of the case, prisoner was sentenced to six months' hard labour. SECOND COURT. (Before Mr. H. C. Yates and other magistrates.) IMPUDENT FRAUDS AT NANTWICH. Robert James Shenton (18), formerly a printer's apprentice, but now out of employ- ment, was indicted for obtaining RA 11s. by fraud from Mr. Harry Mervyn Lutwyche, a young gentleman of means staying at the Brine Baths Hotel, Nantwich.—Mr. Trevor Lloyd said prisoner had been collecting without authority for several clubs. In July he went to Mr. Lutwyche at the Brine Baths Hotel, and asked for a subscription for a new pavilion which, he stated, the cricket club were going to build. Mr. Lutwyche gave him 10s. In August he asked prosecutor for a subscription for the swimming bath, and received one guinea, and subsequently he asked Mr. Lutwyche for a subscription for the football club- from the membership of which, it appeared, he had been expelled. Mr. Lutwyche gave him a cheque for X3, making it payable on prisoner's suggestion to Joseph Johnson, secretary of the club. Prisoner endorsed the cheque n Joseph. Johnson" and cashed it.- Prosecutor entered the box, and Mr. Trevor Lloyd said I am afraid a good many people will go to you for subscriptions."—Prosecutor: They will not get any more. (Laughter.) Pro- ceeding, prosecutor said his suspicions were aroused when he received a letter in prisoner's handwriting purporting to come from the com- mittee of the club. He made inquiries in Nant- wich, and found out that the note and prisoner's collecting book were bogus.—P.S. Jones said prisoner, although out of work, visited billiard rooms.—Prisoner was found guilty, and sen- tenced to six months' hard labour. A DRUNKEN FREAK. Thomas Dodd (26), collier, Haslington, was indicted for stealing a mare, a cart, a set of harness, &c., the property of Joseph Baker, farmer, Warmingham, near Crewe. Mr. Trevor Lloyd prosecuted, and Mr. W. B. Yates defended. On August 10th, while prosecutor's trap was left outside a shop in Crewe, prisoner drove off in it. Prosecuter s servant saw him driving away and shouted at him. The man turned round, saw him, and drove on. Prisoner was afterwards stopped by a police sergeant and taken into custody.—The defence was that prisoner took the horse and trap in a drunken freak, and that he had no intention of convert- ing them to his own use.—He was acquitted. A LIFE OF IMPOSTURE. John Rose (68), described as a gardener, was indicted for obtaining three sums of a shilling each from widows residing at Seacombe and Liscard. Mr. S. Moss, M.P., prosecuted. Pris- oner's modus operandi was to call upon people and represent that he was travelling for a Birkenhead coal firm. By quoting cheap rates he induced them to give him orders, and in each of the three cases in question he obtained Is. on account. None of the people received any coal. The jury found him guilty, with a recommenda- tion to mercy. The Chairman read a long list of convictions, shewing that almost continuously since 1874 prisoner had been convicted of fraud. He described him as being as big an imposter as it was possible to find, and sentenced him to twelve months' hard labour. SENTENCES. Joseph PovaU (29). bricklayer, for burglary at Liscard, was sentenced to two months' hard labour. David Fynkester (21), a Polish Jew, described as a painter, was sentenced to one month's hard labour for burglary, also at Liscard.

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