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THE NATIONAL HOME-READING UNION. » ■■ The annual meeting of the National Home- Reading Union, of which Mr. Yerburgh, M.P., is hon. secretary, was held on Friday evening in the offices of the London School Board, Victoria Embankment. Sir Charles Elliott, who presided over a large gathering, said a party of them on the London School Board had been engaged in a struggle to resist the grow- ing tendency to enlarge the scope of scientific and mathematical teaching and to encourage more what was called the humanities." He was glad to say that during the last school year, for the first time in the history of the Board, there had been a slight increase in the numbers of those who had taken class subjects as compared with those taking mathematics and science. They had now reached the position that the study of literature on the part of the scholars in their elementary schools occupied a higher place than it had ever done before. He should like to see the connection between the schools of the Board and the Home-Reading Union much closer than it was at the present time. One of the greatest benefits they could confer upon the children was to induce them to make use of the union's selected books, reading them both at home and in school, and acquiring in this way that real love of reading for its own sake, not because it was a lesson, which would prove one of their greatest treasures in after life. Dr. Sophie Bryant, in the course of an address on the dangers of the undue systematiza- tion of education, said the play of the imagination and of the fancy was very apt to be checked by a training too narrowly scientific, too entirely fashioned on the lines of logical accuracy and systematic methods. The natural playgrounds for the human mind, the subjects. of learning, of study, of thought, which were naturally preserved as playgrounds, were art and literature. The danger to art from over-systematization seemed to her to be very great, and the same might be said of literature. The great thing to avoid in all attempts at literary lectures or other means of literary education was anything in the nature of dogmatism. They did not want to tell any one what they ought to like. They wanted to bring them on and develop their own faculties of judgment, their own sensitiveness of ear and activity of pictorial imagination, so that they might be able to judge independently for themselves and know what it was they liked. She hoped much more would be done than had been done up to the present by the London School Board and the School Boards of the country to bring good literature and literature of the kind suitable for children within their reach and taste and appreciation. Professor Earl Barnes also addressed the meeting on the necessity for organizing the reading of the people. The proceedings closed with the usual votes of thanks.

OUR SOLDIERS' RETURN*

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CHRISTLETON,

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