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WITHOUT BLEMISH TO-DAY'S PROBLEM.

THE BROKEN GATES OF DEATH.

THE COMMONS AND CROMWELL.

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JOHN HARD'S DISAPPOINTMENT.

WOMEN IN JOURNALISM.:

ENGLISH AND FRENCH WORKMEN.

BOSTON'S GREAT DEBT.

A NEW HALL FOR WESLEYANS.

MR. CURZON'S FAR EASTERN POLICY.

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MR. CURZON'S FAR EASTERN POLICY. In view of the attitude which Mr. Curzon now takes up, as the mouthpiece of the .Government re- garding our policy in the Far East, it is interesting to recall his-views of the situation as recorded by him four years ago in the columns of the National Review: The inhabitants of a small island on the face of the northern seas, we exercise by the valour of our ancestors and the intrepid spirit of our merchants a controlling suffrage in the destinies of the Far East. That influence may, fortunately, be emp/oyed in the undivided interests of Peace. Friendly relations between ourselves and Japan will give to her that naval security which she so much needs, and to us 1 the continued command of the ocean routes. A I similar attitude towards China will strengthen her in a resistance, for which there is yet time, against the only enemy whom she has real cause to fear, and will facilitate our own commercial access to her ter- j ritories by land. Great as is the position which I have depicted as being enjoyed by Great Britain in the Far East. I believe that it will be greater still. The improve- ment of existing and the creation of new means of communication is rapidly developing a solidarity between the East and the West which our grand- parents would have deemed impossible. Fusion and not disintegration will be the keynote of the yrrogress oj the coming century. There remains now but few countries to which access has not already been gained; though there are several whose political stability is precarious, or whose political boundaries are not determined. As soon, however, as fixity can be predicated of either of these departments—much more. if of both-coromercial exploitation will begin. For this object British energy, British capital, and British experience, will be required. The Power which has been longest in the field, which enjoys the best geographical position for the distribution of its commerce, or the dissemination of its influence, and which can command the largest resources, must in- fallibly triumph in any such competition."

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READINGS FOR THE YOUKG.

GARDENING GOSSIP.

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