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,-. )FIELD AND FARM

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IGARDENING GOSSIP.

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HOME RINTS.

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<'Yd, TYPICAL .TIFF.

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ART AND LITERATURE.

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ART AND LITERATURE. THE chief prize-winners among the Royt Academy students this year were Mr. F. M. Bennett Mr. G. W. Bayes, and Mr. H. C. Hide, who took the three gold medals and travelling scholarships foi painting, sculpture, and architecture. Mr. F. Apple- yard secured both the Turner medal for landscape nd the prize for a design for a decoration, Mr. A. G Ackermann the Creswick prize, Mr. Cowper the medal for a cartoon, and Miss F. E. Chaplin and Miss H. E. Thomas the medals for drawing the draped figure. It is worth noting that Mr. Bennett. Mr. Bayes, Mr. Cowper, and Mr. Ackermann re- ceived their preparatory training at St. John's-wood Art School, whence have come of late years many of the students who have made successes in the Academy schools. WHILE Lord Rosebery is studying the lives of emi- nent statesmen of the past—we mentioned his forth- coming book on "Chatham a fortnight ago—some- body, whose name we are unable to give, because We do not. happen to know it, has been studying his career from the cradle to the present time. The first of a series of articles on Lord Rosebery appears in the Woman at Home for January. These articles, when completed, will, we are assured, form by far the fullest biography ever published of any living celebrity. The life will deal with Lord Rosebery's personal as well as his political career. And, while no legitimate source of information has been neglected, the narrative will consist to a great extent of matter which has never appeared any- where in print. Research has formed only a small &nd secondary part of the writer's task. A nnique collection of pictures accompanies the letterprese. Great interest will naturally be aroused as to the authorship of this life of Lord Rosebery, but we understand that the identity of the writer is—at least for the present—a strict secret." If the work is all that we are here promised we may be able, in the excitement of its revelations, to find some consolation for the mystery of its authorship. In the first instalment, which deals largely with Lord Rosebery's ancestry, and is profusely illustrated, one of the most pleasing passages tells of Lord Rose- bery's first speech, delivered at the Scott celebration of 1871, in giving the tout of "The Ladies." He in- cidentally declared his opinion on women's franchise. It may fairly be argued," he eaid; that no rights ue required by those who possess an inherent prerogative to govern men, and that no Legislature can give them a suffrage worth having who are accustomed to receive the suffrages of all man- kind." THE speech of Sir Edward Poynter on the occa- sion of the prize distribution at the Royal Academy, was interesting on acoount of the wholesome advice it contained as to the methods of work which are best for students to follow. His plea for a technical system that is sure and straightforward and not likely to tweak down when tested by lapse of years, was well irorthy of attention, and was marked by sound judg- ment. His attack on Velasquez, whom he found to be lacking in invention, and on Van Dyck, whom he pronounced to be brilliant rather than original, may, however, seem to modern art lovers to be somewhat heretical. It was certainly inspired by convic- tions very much opposed to the present day point of view, and possibly was exaggerated of set pur- pose so as to make more emphatic his advocacy of such painters as Nicholas Poussin, and Claude, as subjects for study. As a purely technical criticism, his suggestion that much of the modem painting would in a few years time suffer appalling changes certainly deserves attention. In the Diploma Gallery itself there are some bad instances of the results of indecision and want of system in working; and it can scarcely be doubted that age will not im- prove the generality of the present day work as it has so many of the canvases of the older masters. But where students are to learn a sound system of prac- tice Sir Edward did not say. They will hardly acquire it by looking at pictures in the National Gal- lery, and they cannot be said to have it laid down for them at the Academy as things are there at pre- sent. There seems to be room somewhere for con- siderable reform. JEITETHA'S VENTURE," by Colonel Harcourt (Casseirs)is a fascinating story of the Siege of Delhi, and gives the reader a vivid impression of the life and action within and without the city. The hero and heroine, both creations of the authors' imagination are strongly drawn, and the whole story is told with the real ism and exactitude of the man who relates what he has actually taken part in. It is an unusually vivid picture of an ever-interesting period. BOME complications seem likely to arise over the proposed exhibition of works of art for the benefit of the War Fund. A committee of artists, with Mr. M. H. Spielmann as Hon. Secretary, has been formed to decide upon the best way of carrying out the scheme. But now it appears that Mr. Harry Quilter has been maturing a similar project, only on a larger scale, and be writes to a centemporary advocating his idea against what are precumed to be the inten- tions of the artists. It is a pity that there should be any division of opinion on such a subject, and it is to be hoped that there will be no attempt to organise two competing shows. Either the artists must give way to Mr. Quilter, who claims to have been first in the field, or Mr. Quilter must retire in the face of numbers. The exhibition most likely to secure the confidence of the public will be the one most worth carrying out. AT a moment when all eyes are fixed on South Africa Mrs. Trotter's volume on the homes of the early Dutch settlers in Cape Colony may be expected to attract a good many readers. By pen, pencil, and photograph Mrs. Trotter illustrates three quaint and picturesque buildings, many of which are in all pro- bability destined to be swept away at an early date. Short historical notes accompany the illustrations, and a chapter on the origin of old Cape architecture is contributed by Mr. Herbert Baker, the architect of Mr. Cecil Rhodes's country house at Groote Schuur. The book is in quarto form, and is published by Mr. B. T. Bats ford. MR. MORTIMER MENPES has not often done better work than that which be is now showing at Messrs. Dowdeswell's gallery. The small collection of etchings and drawings which he has brought together there is in every way remarkable. It reveals not only exceptional technical capacity and rare knowledge of the many details of the etcher's craft, but it makes evident also how great has been the recent develop- ment of Mr. Menpes as a draughtsman and as a student of character, and how solid has been his advance in artistic discretion. Brilliant he has always been, but here be shows as well as brilliancy true reserve and masculine decision, a grasp of his art that puts him amonglthe best men of his time. The exhibition, though a small one, is of the highest importance. A NEW and powerful novel which claims the imagination is Roxane," by Louis Creswicke (Cassell's). The characters are well drawn and I thoroughly alive; that of Roxane is a very charming creation. The whole story is brilliantly told. NOVELISTS offer us many and varied reasons for believing in their books. So many thousand copies sold, letters from Cabinet Ministers, praise from the pulpits, are but a few of the evidences of rare quality presented. But one of the freshest and most in* genuous we have seen for a long past is contained in a (printed) letter from a novelist, who assures us that Mr. Principal Librarian, has permitted me to give his name as a reference with respect to the sterling character of the story. The tale is one of high tone, dealing with war, love, and adventure." Is the time coming when we shall ask and receive references to the characters of books as we now do with regard to servants ? We may shortly expect to receive some such letter as: Dear Sir (or Madam), Yr. (or Miss) Fyers has referred me to you with reference to the character of his (or her) novel, A Lurid Night.' I shall be much obliged if you will kindly let me know whether the book is honest, straightforward, and careful, and whether it may safely be entrusted to young children." THE late William Simpson was reckoned during his life as one of the ablest of the many men who have undertaken the arduous work of the special artist. How justly he was entitled to the reputation he en- joyed for quite nnusual capacity is well proved by the exhibition of his sketches which is now open at Messrs. Graves's Gallery in London. These draw- ings are not less remarkable for their technical excel- lence than for their vivid realisation of subjects and scenes chosen primarily because of their illustrative fitness. They are handled with delightful certainty and force, they have often great beauty of colour and charm of atmospheric effect, and they are drawn with minute exactness that does not, however, dege- nerate into pedantry. The whole collection is fascinating as an artistic fact, and has besides an atmosphere of sturdy individuality that is most uncommon. In the same galleries there is a group of agreeable pastel drawings-portraits and figure subjects—by Miss Eva Withrow. They are mostly rather slight in handling, and are here and there little weak in design; but on the whole they succeed in pleasing, because they have a certain elegance that is sufficiently sincere to give them a touch of dis- tinction. Their manner is frankly decorative, but they show little real study of the solid facts of nature, so that they are open to the reproach of being superficial; yet their affectations are inoffen- sive, and their mannerisms not unintelligent. They are, in fact, essentially feminine. I

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FUN AND FANCY. - )

AMERICAN HUMOUR.

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