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,-. )FIELD AND FARM

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IGARDENING GOSSIP.

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HOME RINTS.

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HOME RINTS. HmirrBCJW comes from indigestion, and can often (remarks Janet," of the Evening News) be cured by taking in a glass of water half a teaspoonful of bak- ing soda, a pinch of powdered ginger, and half a tea- spoonful of powdered rhubarb. HOARSENESS can be relieved immediately by allow- ing a small piece of borax to dissolve in the mouth. It can be cured if the patient keeps silent and swallows a little glycerine from time to time. HICCOUGHS can sometimes be stopped at once by squeezing the left wrist with the first finger and thumb of the right hand. SPRAINS will be rendered less painful if bathed in very hot water or covered with cloths wrung out of very hot water or cold water and spirits (half and hall). SUEr will sometimes come immediately if a hot drink is taken. This draws the blood from the head to the stomach. In serious cases a hop pillow (made of one pound of hops) is excellent, having many of the good and none of the bad effects of drugs. A BURN can be relieved by frequent application of powdered charcoal to the injured part. Now that the winter weather has fairly set in, and so many people in our variable climate suffer from rheumatism, readers may be glad (a writer in the Rural World says) to know of the following simple and tltHcoorous liniment. Beat together the yolk of one egg, two tablespoonfuls each of vinegar and tur- pentine, and one tablespoonful of acetic acid. Keep in a well covered jar or bottle. INFLUENZA need not be the deadly malady it i s leaving such serious and disastrous consequences behind it, if we would only take it more seriously in the beginning. We do not take pains enough to stop its beginnings, partly because we do not recognise it. Sometimes it shows as sore throat; or with intense pain in the limbs; another time with terrible frontal headache, or in its French form as la grippe"—that is, in its old form of diarrhoea and sickness. Any and all of these forms are accompanied by high temperature, and the excessive and sudden weakness which is its peculiar mark. In any oase bed is the right place, and a diet for a few days of nourishing hot slops (hot milk being a powerful restorative), the right food. Patience, warmth, and lying still will do far more at this stage than any drugs; thus, hand- kerchiefs, &0., sprinkled with oil of eucalpytus, are a great relief to the patient's eyes and head, and pre- vent its spreading toothers. WHEN cleaning silver it should never (advises Spare Moments) be rubbed with flannel or cotton -cloth. When not used it will become tarnished if exposed to light and air therefore, to keep it in good con- dition, each piece should be carefully wrapped in white tissue paper. The plated ware will assume a dignity treated in this manner, and will always look bright and clean. WASHING MEN'S SILK TIM. The lining should ^always be firmly tacked in place before washing. If this is done it will not ruck up, as it would otherwise do. spoiling the appearance and rendering the tie more difficult to iron. FLUSHING m8 KITCHEN Sum.-All sinks where dishes are wished, greasy water poured down, or 'water in whidh vegetables have been boiled, should have a thorough flushing with hot water, followed by cold witter everv day; HAIR WAsn.—When your hair is dry and lacking in gloss, it -should be washed twice a month, using in the water (which should be fairly hot) a yolk of an egg, a little .powdered borax, and half a teaspoonful of baking powder. Rub the egg well into the scalp, then >rinse most thoroughly. This will be found an excellent remedy for dry hair. MAHMAI.AIVR TARTLETS.—Mis two ^ounces ofbread- crumbs and two tablespoonfuls of marmalade in a pint of boiling milk; beat up three eggs, melt two ounces of butter, and add all to the milk, &c., with sugar to btflte. Line patty-pans with short crust, then half fill with this mixture, and bake till set and the,pae»ry is done. Sift caster sugar ever, and serve. DUCHKSB PUDDING.—Mix a pint of milk with an ounce of cornflour; boil up; add two ounces of sugar and two tablespoonfuls «f crumbled sponge- cake. Beat sill well together, and when cool add four well-beaten eggs and half a glass of sherry. Decomte a mould with raisins^und citron peel, and steam 'the ,piidding in it for am hoar and a'half. Turn,onland serve with custard sauce. CIIEHSK BISCUITS.'—Place four ounces of Parmesan cheeseand four ounces of pastry fiotir in a basin. Add a little salt, and a small seasoning of cayenne. Rub intotthis two ounces of butter, and make into a stiff dough with the yolk of an egg. Roll the pastry out, thinly, cut it into rounds with a cutter, prick with a fork, and bake it in a «owl oven till crisp. Keep these biscuits in a tin till quite cool. GROUND RICE CAKES.—Beat the whites <of four eggs to a froth in three and a half ounces of lump sugar/rolled and finely sifted. Then whisk the yolks of the eggs thoroughly. Whip all well together, then etirincttrefulty about three ounces of ground rice, two tablespoonfuls -of orange or rose water, the rind of two lemoM, grated. Thoroughly beat all together for fifteen minutes. Bake inygreaeed moulds in a quiok oven. Apple JAM.—3Jo each pound of apple pulp add the strained juice of a lemon, the grated rind of half a SeviUe orange, and three-quarters of a pound of caster sugar. Stir, and simmer for fifteen minutes. Put the jam into ipots, and tie them down the follow- ing day with parchment covers. POTATO SOUP.—Put about a dozen peeled potatoes and six onions into a saucepan of boiling water. When boiled setft ipour away the water, rub through a colander <or coarse sieve with a wooden smasher, then add milk, pepper, and salt, and a piece of butter, making the soup fairly thick. With this croutons of bread, browned in a hot oven, should be served. FRESH HERRINGS.—This fish is most appetising if properly prepared. T.bey should be taken by the tail and the scales rubbed up towards the head. This will remove them without impairing the fish; then roll the fish in flour (oatmeal if preferred); fry them in pure salad oil, and when done lay them before the fire to get dry and crisp. Serve up with lemon-juice, cayenne, aad brown bread And butter.—L&ucUm Journal. CHEAP SMRQII Cake.—Three eggs, three cups of flour, two cups of sugar, half a cup of milk, -see teaspoonful of <cream of tartar, half a teaspoonful of soda, lemon. Bake quickly. A REMEDY roa SPASMS.—To cure this distressing form of malady, take twopenny worth of camphor and infuse it into one pint of brandy. Let it stand forty- I eight hours, and then it is fit for use. When the attack comes qR., take one teaspoonful in a wineglass- Jul of water. To MAKE Arrtn Jsaaxr.—Take two dozen golden pippins or russets, pare them, and cover with water; boil till the apples are reduced to a pulp, then strain through a jelly-bag, and to every pint of jelly add one pound of sugar. Boil it for a quarter of an hour, add a little lemon-juice, keep it boiling, and skim. Try a little in a plate; when it sets it is boiled enough. Foa chapped hands use glycerine and good olive oil, in the proportion of two parts of the former to four of the latter. After this has been well rubbed into the hands, and allowed to remain for a little time, and the bands subsequently washed with Castile soap and trepid water, a belladonna and collodion flexile should be painted on them, and the protection I allowed to permanently remain. HADDOCK TOAST ANO EGGS is Always popular at a late meal. Lay the flaked flesh of a cooked smoked haddott on squares of buttered toast. Cover them with thin slices of buttered toast, and place in the Oven to get quite hot, while you break three or four eggs into a small saucepan, with some salt, a good pinch of pepper, and two ounces of butter. Stir over a moderate fire till the mixture has become smooth and rather thick, then pour it over the toast and serve at once. ROAST SUCKING PIO.—Scald it; put some bread- crumbs, age, pepper, and salt inside and sew it up. Skewer the legs back; lay it to a brisk fire till dry. Rub the pig over with butter; dredge flour over it; scrape off the flour with a blunt knife; rub it well with a buttered cloth, and take off the head while at the fire; then take it up, cut it down the back and front, lay it. in the dish, chop the sage and bread very fine, and mix a little flour and plenty of melted butter. It may be served whole, in which case the gravy should lie poured into the sauce, and it should be garnished with bread sauce and currants.—Spare Moments.

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<'Yd, TYPICAL .TIFF.

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ART AND LITERATURE.

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FUN AND FANCY. - )

AMERICAN HUMOUR.

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